Associated building – Village Under Forest http://villageunderforest.com/ Thu, 13 Jan 2022 21:47:19 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://villageunderforest.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-2021-06-25T171231.357-150x150.png Associated building – Village Under Forest http://villageunderforest.com/ 32 32 After 3 years of construction, Cards’ Murray is ready for the playoffs – KIRO 7 news Seattle https://villageunderforest.com/after-3-years-of-construction-cards-murray-is-ready-for-the-playoffs-kiro-7-news-seattle/ Thu, 13 Jan 2022 21:47:19 +0000 https://villageunderforest.com/after-3-years-of-construction-cards-murray-is-ready-for-the-playoffs-kiro-7-news-seattle/ Kyler Murray has maintained a low-key demeanor throughout his football career, sticking with a “never too high, never too low” philosophy that has allowed him to thrive from high school through to the NFL. But the Arizona Cardinals quarterback admits this week is a little different. “As a competitor it’s as big as it gets,” […]]]>

Kyler Murray has maintained a low-key demeanor throughout his football career, sticking with a “never too high, never too low” philosophy that has allowed him to thrive from high school through to the NFL.

But the Arizona Cardinals quarterback admits this week is a little different.

“As a competitor it’s as big as it gets,” said Murray. “It’s the playoffs. It’s what you dream of, it’s what you live for, it’s what you play for, the opportunity to go and win a Super Bowl.

“There is nothing to do without.”

The Cardinals selected Murray with Oklahoma’s No.1 pick in 2019 in hopes it would provide those pressurized playoff weeks. The 24-year-old delivered the regular season, proving quick study by completing three stellar regular seasons.

Now, for the first time in his career, the NFL playoffs await him. The Cardinals (11-6) will visit the Los Angeles Rams (12-5) on Monday night in the wild card round.

“I eat, breathe and sleep football,” Murray said. “To be in this situation, I’m just excited about it. There is no fear, there are no nerves to play at a high level, you just have to go out there and run the games and be yourself. I treasure this moment and am excited for it.

The timing is important, not only for Murray, but also for third-year coach Kliff Kingsbury. The two were brought to Arizona as part of a comprehensive deal in 2019. Kingsbury’s specialty is developing quarterbacks and the relationship between the two has been central to the team’s rise to a record. from 5-10-1 in 2019 to 8-8 in 2020, to this year’s 11-game winning campaign.

Kingsbury has a lot to worry about when preparing for the Rams. There’s the strong arm of Matthew Stafford and the road racing of Cooper Kupp. There is a defense that includes stars like Jalen Ramsey and Aaron Donald.

But Murray’s ability to perform under pressure is not one of them.

“I think that’s what he’s been waiting for three years,” Kingsbury said. “He’s a guy who wants to play for something and knows he’s playing for something. This is his first shot in the playoffs, and I expect him to play probably the best game of. his career, I know he’s going to give it his all.

The Cardinals’ biggest concern is rocking a late-season funk that dulled the team’s momentum heading into the playoffs. Arizona started the year 7-0, but faded away with a 4-6 record in the last 10 games, including 1-4 in the last five.

Murray’s season mirrored the team’s record. He was awesome in September and October – emerging as one of the league’s MVP contenders – before production slumped slowly. A three-game absence with an ankle injury didn’t help. Neither has lost three-time All-Pro receiver DeAndre Hopkins to a knee injury.

Now the Cardinals are trying to find a way to get that early-season mojo back. Arizona played their best game of the season in a Week 4 win over the Rams, dominating from start to finish in the 37-20 win.

But the Rams rebounded in Week 14 to beat the Cardinals 30-23 in Monday Night Football.

Round 3 is fast approaching.

“I think everyone continues to evolve and find ways you can improve,” Kingsbury said. the regimes that people run. I think there is always a way to be innovative when you get to this point.

But innovation does not go further. At some point on Monday Murray will likely have to perform better and just make a play when it matters most.

Judging by the rest of his career, he will be ready.

“You have to play well in these games or you’re not going to be considered ‘that guy’,” said Murray. “I understand the responsibility I have towards this team to come out and play well.”

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More AP NFL coverage: https://apnews.com/hub/NFL and https://twitter.com/AP_NFL

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Governor Abbott Renames Four Members of Texas Workforce Investment Council | Oficina del Gobernador from Texas https://villageunderforest.com/governor-abbott-renames-four-members-of-texas-workforce-investment-council-oficina-del-gobernador-from-texas/ Tue, 11 Jan 2022 20:55:28 +0000 https://villageunderforest.com/governor-abbott-renames-four-members-of-texas-workforce-investment-council-oficina-del-gobernador-from-texas/ January 11, 2022 | Austin, Texas | Appointment Governor Greg Abbott has reappointed Joe Arnold, Lindsey Geeslin, Wayne Oswald, and Paul Puente to the Texas Workforce Investment Council for terms that expire on September 1, 2027. The council assesses the Texas workforce system by analyzing data and reporting, providing analysis and advice during policy deliberations […]]]>

January 11, 2022 | Austin, Texas | Appointment

Governor Greg Abbott has reappointed Joe Arnold, Lindsey Geeslin, Wayne Oswald, and Paul Puente to the Texas Workforce Investment Council for terms that expire on September 1, 2027. The council assesses the Texas workforce system by analyzing data and reporting, providing analysis and advice during policy deliberations and integrating workforce programs to increase the benefits of these programs for all Texans.

Joe arnold of Muldoon is Assistant Vice Chancellor and Executive External Relations Officer for Texas State Technical College, where he is responsible for identifying, building and improving relationships with industry and trade associations across Texas. He is currently a member of the Board of Directors of the Associated Chemical Industry of Texas and is a past member of the Texas Chemical Council, the Texas Association of Manufacturers, and the Texas Farm Bureau of Burnet County. Arnold attended Lamar University.

Lindsey Geeslin of Lorena is Sales Manager for Lhoist and has worked in the construction industry for 16 years. She is the former Executive Director of the Texas Masonry Council and remains an active member. She is a member of the Women of Asphalt, Women in Mining, and the Texas Chapter of the American Public Work Association and is a volunteer with the Texas Masonry Council. Geeslin received a Bachelor of Science in Farm Business Management from Texas State University.

Wayne Oswald of Angleton is the former Executive Director of the Houston Business Roundtable, where he managed the operations of the Greater Houston Area Industrial Construction Users Council. Previously, he was responsible for maintenance for The Dow Chemical Company. He is a past Chairman of the Texas Skill Standards Board, the Houston Business Roundtable Contractor Workforce Development Committee and the Brazoria County Petrochemical Council Contractor Committee and a former member of the Texas Gulf Coast Associated Builders and Contractors Education Committee. Oswald received a Bachelor of Science degree from the University of Houston.

Paul Puente of Houston is the executive secretary of the Houston Gulf Coast Building and Construction Trades Council, which represents various local construction unions and twenty counties. He is a member of the American Leadership Forum Houston / Gulf Coast Chapter and is President of the West Gulf Ports Council. In addition, he sits on the committees of the Houston Business Roundtable and the Greater Houston Partnership and is a member of the board of directors of Houston First Corporation. Puente earned an associate’s degree in electrical technology from San Jacinto and received his journeyman’s license from the Texas Department of Licensing and Regulations.

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Who’s Afraid of an ICBM Review? https://villageunderforest.com/whos-afraid-of-an-icbm-review/ Sun, 09 Jan 2022 13:00:00 +0000 https://villageunderforest.com/whos-afraid-of-an-icbm-review/ The Pentagon’s $ 75,000 grant to the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace for a study of options for the earth leg of the nuclear triad sparked howls of protest from amplifiers of the Pentagon’s plan to build a new, known ICBM. officially under the name Ground- Based on Nuclear Deterrence, or GBSD. Senator James Inhofe, […]]]>

The Pentagon’s $ 75,000 grant to the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace for a study of options for the earth leg of the nuclear triad sparked howls of protest from amplifiers of the Pentagon’s plan to build a new, known ICBM. officially under the name Ground- Based on Nuclear Deterrence, or GBSD. Senator James Inhofe, R-Okla., And Representative Mike Rogers, R-Ala., Ranking Republicans on the Senate and House armed services committees, argued that the issue had already been well studied and that Carnegie’s effort should be canceled.

Why the uproar? Isn’t it worth spending $ 75,000 to assess whether to go ahead with a program that could cost $ 264 billion over its lifespan, including $ 110 billion for development and supply ? The outrage expressed by Inhofe and Rogers suggests the fear of the outcome of an assessment that could involve questioning the need for a new ICBM or proposing a significant change in DoD’s plans for the system. As noted by James Acton, who is working on the Carnegie study, it “will identify the benefits, risks and unanswered questions associated with a number of alternatives.” It seems like common sense before locking the Pentagon into building a new ICBM that could last until 2075, at a phenomenal cost to American taxpayers.

On the contrary, the Carnegie study should be only one part of a larger effort to determine whether a new ICBM is really needed. Senator Elizabeth Warren, a member of the Senate Armed Services Committee, called for a technical and budgetary assessment of the potential to refurbish and extend the useful life of the current ICBM Minuteman III fleet as an alternative to the construction of the GBSD. A 2020 report from the Union of Concerned Scientists noted that a number of past assessments, including those by the Air Force, RAND Corporation, and the Congressional Budget Office, suggested that the current ICBMs could be extended until 2045 for tens of billions. less than the cost of building a new ICBM. The Air Force and the RAND Company have since contradicted these earlier findings, but their new claims appear to be based on questionable assumptions as to when the decision point for building a new ICBM rather than sticking to the existing missiles should be. A recent RAND report that partly addresses the question of whether to modernize existing ICBMs or build a new one largely reiterates the Air Force’s own arguments. Hence the need for a new independent assessment, as requested by Senator Warren.

The larger question hanging over this whole debate is whether ICBMs are really necessary. The current US strength of nuclear bombers and hard-to-detect ballistic missile submarines is more than sufficient to deter any country from attacking the United States, and many analysts have concluded that keeping ICBMs in the force is much riskier than getting rid of them. As former Defense Secretary William Perry noted, ICBMs are “some of the most dangerous weapons in the world” because the president would only have a few minutes to decide whether or not to launch them in a crisis. which greatly increases the risk of an accidental nuclear explosion. war based on a false alarm.

So why are we prepared to invest hundreds of billions of dollars in a new ICBM? In part, the motivation of the GBSD is based on outdated thinking that treats the triad of nuclear bombers, submarines and land missiles as sacrosanct, regardless of the current realities of the global nuclear balance. But another powerful reason for rushing forward on a new ICBM is the pig barrel policy: money that will go to major contractors like Northrop Grumman and key states like Montana, Wyoming, Utah, Dakota. North and California for construction and supply of bases. for the new system. The Senate even has an “ICBM Coalition” made up of Senators from four of the five key states mentioned above who have been remarkably successful over the years in blocking any changes in ICBM spending or deployment. And the dozen entrepreneurs involved in the ICBM program have made millions of dollars in campaign contributions to key members of Congress to strengthen their case for building the new system, including hundreds of thousands to advocates like the Senator. Inhofe and Representative Rogers. Campaign money doesn’t always end up in decisions that directly benefit the donor, but it guarantees access that makes it much easier to defend.

As we approach the release date for Team Biden’s Nuclear Posture Review, one can only hope that the administration remains open to further thinking about the future of the ICBM force. Our long-term security depends on it.

William D. Hartung is Principal Investigator at the Quincy Institute for Responsible Statecraft and author of “Prophets of War: Lockheed Martin and the Making of the Military Industrial Complex”. Prior to joining the Quincy Institute, he was Director of the Weapons and Security Program at the Center for International Policy and Co-Director of the Center’s Sustainable Defense Working Group.


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Here are the latest sports news from the Associated Press Pac-12 Conference | National News from the Associated Press https://villageunderforest.com/here-are-the-latest-sports-news-from-the-associated-press-pac-12-conference-national-news-from-the-associated-press/ Sat, 08 Jan 2022 10:00:06 +0000 https://villageunderforest.com/here-are-the-latest-sports-news-from-the-associated-press-pac-12-conference-national-news-from-the-associated-press/ NO DATE (AP) – AP college football writer Ralph Russo says college football needs a peacemaker. He says administrators responsible for running the college football playoffs appear to be at a stalemate when it comes to expansion. No one is against expanding the current field to four, but they now appear to be entrenched in […]]]>

NO DATE (AP) – AP college football writer Ralph Russo says college football needs a peacemaker. He says administrators responsible for running the college football playoffs appear to be at a stalemate when it comes to expansion. No one is against expanding the current field to four, but they now appear to be entrenched in opposing positions regarding how and when. The CFP management committee is due to meet in Indianapolis this weekend to discuss a new format for nominating a champion. Russo says someone has to have the authority to build consensus within the group.

STANFORD, Calif. (AP) – Lexie Hull set career records of 33 points and seven 3-pointers, and No.2 Stanford withstood a late rally from Oregon en route to an 80-68 victory. Hull’s 3 with 4:05 left gave Stanford a 73-62 lead after Oregon reduced the Cardinal’s lead to single digits and landed another opportune shot from the depths with 1:43 to player. Reigning National Champion Cardinal (10-3, 2-0 Pac-12) experienced turnovers that saw the Ducks come back in the fourth quarter with a 14-2 streak. Endiya Rogers scored 22 points and Nyara Sabally added 19 points and eight rebounds to lead Oregon (7-5, 0-1).

TUCSON, Ariz. (AP) – Cate Reese had 20 points and Arizona No.4 used a dominant third quarterback to beat visiting Washington 60-52 in their first Pac-12 Conference game. and his first game in three weeks. It was Wildcats coach Adia Barnes’ 100th victory, and it came as Arizona reached 11-0 for the second time in three seasons. Reese was 8 of 14 in the field and placed 10th on the school career scorers list with 1,306 points. Krystal Legler-Walker led WSU 9-5 with 12 points, nine rebounds and six assists.

CORVALLIS, Ore. (AP) – The state of Oregon imploded the west side of Reser Stadium, beginning the next phase of a facility renovation project. Sporting director Scott Barnes set off the explosives which knocked down part of the building. A crowd watched from a safe distance. The $ 153 million renovation project is expected to be completed before the 2023 football season. The new addition will include a wellness center for students and faculty.

DURHAM, NC (AP) – Men’s and women’s basketball coaches across the country face the fitness challenge that accompanies COVID-19 breaks. After stopping a program due to anti-virus protocols, it is a matter of putting players back in “game form” after a sudden shutdown of the program. They should also avoid injury by pushing too hard too fast. No. 2 Duke, No. 5 UCLA and Florida are on the men’s teams. Number 11 UConn also faces that test as the Huskies return this weekend after a roughly three-week stoppage.

Copyright 2022 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.


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Magnetic surprise revealed in graphene at “magic angle” https://villageunderforest.com/magnetic-surprise-revealed-in-graphene-at-magic-angle/ Thu, 06 Jan 2022 19:57:58 +0000 https://villageunderforest.com/magnetic-surprise-revealed-in-graphene-at-magic-angle/ PROVIDENCE, RI [Brown University] – When two sheets of graphene, a carbon nanomaterial, are stacked at a particular angle to each other, it results in fascinating physics. For example, when this so called “magic angle graphene” is cooled to near absolute zero, it suddenly becomes a superconductor, which means it conducts electricity with zero resistance. […]]]>

PROVIDENCE, RI [Brown University] – When two sheets of graphene, a carbon nanomaterial, are stacked at a particular angle to each other, it results in fascinating physics. For example, when this so called “magic angle graphene” is cooled to near absolute zero, it suddenly becomes a superconductor, which means it conducts electricity with zero resistance.

Now, a Brown University research team has discovered a surprising new phenomenon that can occur in magical angle graphene. In research published in the journal Science, the team showed that by inducing a phenomenon known as spin-orbit coupling, magical angle graphene becomes a strong ferro-magnet.

“Magnetism and superconductivity are generally at opposite ends of the spectrum in condensed matter physics, and they rarely appear in the same material platform,” said Jia Li, assistant professor of physics at Brown and main author of the research. “Yet we have shown that we can create magnetism in a system that originally hosts superconductivity. This gives us a new way to study the interplay between superconductivity and magnetism, and offers exciting new possibilities for research in quantum science.

Magical-angled graphene has been causing a stir in physics in recent years. Graphene is a two-dimensional material made up of carbon atoms arranged in a honeycomb. Single sheets of graphene are interesting in themselves – displaying remarkable material resistance and extremely efficient electrical conductance. But things get even more interesting when the graphene sheets are stacked. Electrons begin to interact not only with other electrons in a graphene sheet, but also with those in the adjacent sheet. Changing the angle of the sheets relative to each other alters these interactions, giving rise to interesting quantum phenomena like superconductivity.

This new research adds a new wrinkle – spin-orbit coupling – to this already interesting system. Spin-orbit coupling is a state of behavior of electrons in certain materials in which the spin of each electron – its small magnetic moment that points up or down – becomes bound to its orbit around the atomic nucleus.

“We know that spin-orbit coupling gives rise to a wide range of interesting quantum phenomena, but it is not normally present in magic angle graphene,” said Jiang-Xiazi Lin, postdoctoral fellow at Brown and lead author of the study. “We wanted to introduce spin-orbit coupling and then see what effect that had on the system.”

To do this, Li and his team interfaced magic-angled graphene with a block of tungsten diselenide, a material with strong spin-orbit coupling. The alignment of the stack precisely induces a spin-orbit coupling in the graphene. From there, the team probed the system with external electric currents and magnetic fields.

Experiments have shown that an electric current flowing in one direction through the material in the presence of an external magnetic field produces a voltage in the direction perpendicular to the current. This voltage, known as the Hall effect, is the telltale signature of an intrinsic magnetic field in the material.

Much to the research team’s surprise, they showed that the magnetic state could be controlled using an external magnetic field, oriented either in the graphene plane or out of the plane. This contrasts with magnetic materials without spin-orbit coupling, where intrinsic magnetism can only be controlled when the external magnetic field is aligned along the direction of magnetism.

“This observation is an indication that spin-orbit coupling is indeed present and provided the key to building a theoretical model to understand the influence of the atomic interface,” said Yahui Zhang, a theoretical physicist at Harvard University. who worked with Brown’s team. understand the physics associated with observed magnetism.

“The unique influence of spin-orbit coupling gives scientists a new experimental knob to turn in the effort to understand the behavior of magically angled graphene,” said Erin Morrissette, a graduate student at Brown who performed some of the experimental work. “The results also have the potential for new device applications. “

One possible application is in the memory of the computer. The team discovered that the magnetic properties of magical angle graphene can be controlled with both external magnetic fields and electric fields. This would make this two-dimensional system an ideal candidate for a magnetic memory device with flexible read / write options.

Another potential application is quantum computing, according to the researchers. An interface between a ferromagnetic and a superconductor has been proposed as a potential building block for quantum computers. The problem, however, is that such an interface is difficult to create because magnets are generally destructive to superconductivity. But a material capable of both ferromagnetism and superconductivity could provide a way to create this interface.

“We are working on using the atomic interface to stabilize superconductivity and ferromagnetism at the same time,” Li said. “The coexistence of these two phenomena is rare in physics, and it will certainly unlock more excitement.”

The research was primarily funded by Brown University. Additional co-authors are Ya-Hui Zhang,, Zhi Wang, Song Liu, Daniel Rhodes, Kenji Watanabe, Takashi Taniguchi, and James Hone.


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Despite brutal video, only GOP minority say 1/6 very violent https://villageunderforest.com/despite-brutal-video-only-gop-minority-say-1-6-very-violent/ Tue, 04 Jan 2022 21:03:28 +0000 https://villageunderforest.com/despite-brutal-video-only-gop-minority-say-1-6-very-violent/ WASHINGTON (AP) – The fights – so primitive and fierce one Capitol police officer described it as “medieval” and another as “a trip to hell” – left over 100 law enforcement personnel injured, some beaten with their own weapons. Video cameras captured the violence live, with rioters clubbing officers with flags and fire extinguishers, even […]]]>

WASHINGTON (AP) – The fights – so primitive and fierce one Capitol police officer described it as “medieval” and another as “a trip to hell” – left over 100 law enforcement personnel injured, some beaten with their own weapons.

Video cameras captured the violence live, with rioters clubbing officers with flags and fire extinguishers, even hugging one between doors as he begged for his life.

Yet almost a year after the siege of January 6 According to a new poll from the Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research, only about 4 in 10 Republicans remember the attack on supporters of then-President Donald Trump as very violent or extremely violent. About 3 in 10 Republicans say the attack was not violent, and about 3 in 10 say it was somewhat violent.

Their views were a distinct minority as overall about two-thirds of Americans described the day as very or extremely violent, including about 9 in 10 Democrats.

The results reflect the political polarization of the country, with a misrepresentation of the siege that settles despite numerous images showing the ransacking of the building in heartbreaking detail. Trump and some allies in Congress and the conservative media downplayed him, falsely qualifying the attack as a minor civil disturbance.

This is a view shared by many Republicans, although few go so far as to defend the rioters themselves.

“I thought it was mostly pretty peaceful,” Paul Bender, a self-proclaimed Cleveland conservative, told The Associated Press in a recent interview. “I have seen videos of people walking through a velvet rope.”

Bender, who said he was not following the media coverage, added: “There were definitely some outrageous people who weren’t peaceful and smashing windows and stuff like that, but I wasn’t in. current of overt violence. “

Meanwhile, the percentage of Americans who blame Trump for the Jan. 6 riot has increased slightly over the past year, with 57% of them saying he bears significant responsibility for what happened. In an AP-NORC poll conducted in the days following the attack, 50% said so.

The rise is also seen among Republicans, although relatively few believe Trump bears significant responsibility. Twenty-two percent say so now, up from 11% last year. Sixty percent say he had little or no responsibility.

“I don’t think he actively encouraged people to do anything other than a peaceful protest,” said Bender, 53. “However, once things got out of hand, I think it would have been appropriate for him to react sooner, whether it was a statement or a radio or television appearance or whatever.”

Insurgency was the final act of Trump’s desperate effort to undo his electoral defeat against Joe Biden. After Trump’s baseless allegations of voter fraud were categorically rejected by the courts, he focused on Electoral College certification on Jan.6, publicly pressuring then-Vice President Mike Pence to prevent Congress from naming Biden the winner. Pence did not have that power under the law, as the vice president’s office is largely ceremonial.

Trump promoted the Jan. 6 rally that preceded the attack, predicting it would be “savage,” and in a speech that day urged his supporters to “fight like hell.” that Congress met to certify the election results. The attack interrupted this process for hours as rioters occupied the building.

Yet while few Republicans blame Trump, Republicans and Democrats overwhelmingly say that individual rioters had a great deal or a great deal of responsibility for their actions during the riot.

“I think there were strong supporters of President Trump who were there, but I think the people who caused the attacks may not have been true supporters of Trump,” said Mary Beth Bell of Jacksonville. , in Florida. “Because I know a lot of Trump supporters, and they see what happened on January 6 as disgusting as I do.”

About 7 in 10 Americans also say that a select House committee should continue to investigate the attack, while around 3 in 10 say it shouldn’t.

Robert Spry, a Democrat from Kingman, Ariz., Said the congressional investigation was crucial to uncovering the truth.

“We need a full report from that day. You have to shine a light on what these people did to the police and to this building, ”Spry said.

The 63-year-old, who used to vote Republican but now considers himself a conservative Democrat, said the protest turned into an attack seemed chaotic at first, but the committee’s findings show “increasingly clearly that ‘it was planned in advance’. “

Forty-one percent of Republicans agree with Spry that Congress should continue to investigate, while 58 percent say it shouldn’t.

Bell said a federal investigation into what she considered “a terrorist attack” was appropriate, but she objects to the way the nine-member panel has conducted the investigation since July of last year.

“They don’t listen to all the news. I feel like it’s more or less one-sided to try to investigate everything, ”she said of the committee, made up of seven Democrats and two Republicans. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi chose all committee members after rejecting House GOP leadership choices.

Representative Bennie Thompson, Democratic chair of the committee, said it is important for Americans to know that Democrats first tried to create a bipartisan commission with an equal number of members from each party. But Republicans in the Senate blocked its passage.

“It is only because the Republican leadership has failed in this country that President Pelosi has had to step in and do what is in the best interest of the country to ensure that we produce a committee that examines the facts and circumstances. Jan. 6, ”Thompson said.

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The AP-NORC survey of 1,089 adults was conducted December 2-7 using a sample drawn from the AmeriSpeak probability-based NORC panel, which is designed to be representative of the American population. The margin of sampling error for all respondents is plus or minus 4.1 percentage points.


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Fueled by billions of dollars, nuclear fusion enters a new era https://villageunderforest.com/fueled-by-billions-of-dollars-nuclear-fusion-enters-a-new-era/ Sun, 02 Jan 2022 21:00:59 +0000 https://villageunderforest.com/fueled-by-billions-of-dollars-nuclear-fusion-enters-a-new-era/ Inside the “Tokamak” fusion reactor under construction as part of the ITER fusion project in France, September 2021. ASSOCIATED PRESS After raising more than $ 3 billion in 2021 from Bill Gates and Jeff Bezos, fusion developers insist this carbon-free energy source could be a reality within a decade. It is clear that nuclear fusion […]]]>

After raising more than $ 3 billion in 2021 from Bill Gates and Jeff Bezos, fusion developers insist this carbon-free energy source could be a reality within a decade.

It is clear that nuclear fusion can work on a large scale – you just have to look at the stars. For 70 years, physicists have dreamed of bottling this stellar power in the form of fusion reactors that would feed the power grid with the same limitless, carbon-free reactions that make the sun shine. This holy grail has long been heralded as 20 or 30 years from now, but fusion fans have refused to give up the faith. And for good reason. Fusion (breaking down hydrogen atoms together into helium) promises unlimited carbon-free electrical energy with zero risk of fusion and virtually none of the radioactive waste associated with existing nuclear power plants that operate by fission (the division of uranium atoms into smaller elements).

The dream inspired Ajay Royan, co-founder of Mithril Capital (along with billionaire Peter Thiel), who in 2013 first invested $ 2 million in Helion Energy, based in Redmond, Wash., In order to be able to construct a prototype of a “repetitive pulse power” machine. Mithril has invested in Helion ever since, including his recent $ 500 million funding round (valuing the company at $ 3 billion) – with the pledge of $ 1.7 billion more if the company’s seventh prototype works as hoped. The Helion tour was led by Sam Altman of Y Combinator.

2021 has been an important year for both funding and merger forecasting, as developers have raised more than $ 3 billion to fund their next set of machines – some of which now promise a commercially viable merger in just five years. . Royan is happy to see the merger attracting more attention; “Sure, 2021 may be a turning point for merger according to Google Analytics, but the real turning point came a decade ago when power electronics broke a threshold.”

CEO David Kirtley explains that the first R&D work behind Helion was done in federal labs, from which Helion was formed in 2013. Freed from the federal R&D bureaucracy, Helion has since built new prototypes one after the other. others. “The startup mentality is not pleasant to have, it is a requirement. and what we focused on from the start, ”says Kirtley.

In 2020, Helion completed its sixth prototype reactor, dubbed Trenta. She is currently building a seventh, Polaris, while already designing the eighth, Antares, which Kirtley intends to be the first fusion machine to produce more power than it consumes. Along with the rapid iteration, Helion benefits from local expertise. It builds the Polaris machine in Everett, Wash., Near Boeing’s largest factories, where they can tap into a welcoming ecosystem of contract engineers and precision manufacturers. Kirtley says they spend the morning tinkering, updating systems, and turning on capacitors. “Every afternoon at 3 p.m. we start to do fusion.”

To understand Helion’s approach, let’s first consider the magnetic repulsion that occurs when you try to force the positive poles of two magnetic bars together. This is the principle that allows “mag-lev” technology like Japan’s famous high-speed trains, which use magnetic repulsion to float on a cushion of air.

For decades, fusion researchers have sought to design the most powerful electromagnets in the world, with which they design reaction chambers with magnetic fields so strong that they can contain and compress an injected flux of positively charged protons. in a ball of plasma so hot they fuse into helium.

In Helion’s new system, the energy released in fusion reactions constantly pushes against its magnetic confining field, which pushes back – causing oscillations (“like a piston,” Kirtley says) that generate an electric current, which Helion picks up directly from the reactor. (Read more on Faraday’s Law of Induction.)

Royan de Mithril says that perhaps the greatest attraction of Helion’s method of direct electricity generation is its simplicity. Other fusion approaches aim to generate heat, in order to boil water and power steam turbines, which generate electricity, as in traditional nuclear power plants. “We can do it without steam turbines or cooling towers. We are getting rid of the power plant.

Granted, Kirtley understands merger skepticism, especially around its aggressive schedule. He began his career in the field of fusion, inspired by scientists at National Laboratories in the 1960s who made great strides in magnetic containment (by competing with Russian scientists to design donut-shaped reactors called tokamaks ) even before the invention of transistors. But Kirtley lost confidence after determining that early approaches simply couldn’t evolve fast enough to produce a commercial solution. He returned to the field in 2008 to help commercialize Helion’s technology.

Over time, he plans to make fusion generators in a factory. A 50 MW scale system, packaged in three units the size of a shipping container, would power 40,000 homes. “In 10 years, we’ll have commercial electricity to sell, that’s for sure. ”

This puts Helion in a race with Commonwealth Fusion Systems, a Boston-based MIT spinoff company that has raised $ 1.8 billion from investors such as Bill Gates and George Soros. CEO Bob Mumgaard says they will have a working reactor in 6 years. His optimism is bolstered by the Commonwealth’s successful summer test of new electromagnets designed with superconductors made from rare earth copper and barium oxide.

Mumgaard says these overpowered magnets will allow the Commonwealth to hone their somewhat more traditional fusion approach of building a donut-shaped “tokamak” reactor, which Mumgaard calls a “big magnetic bottle” where strong magnetic fields control balls of fire. 100 million degree plasma – “star stuff.”

There are around 150 tokamaks in the world; the biggest is under construction in France for 30 billion dollars by an international consortium called ITER. The 20,000-ton machine, the size of a basketball arena, is expected to be completed by 2035.

But Mumgaard intends for Commonwealth Fusion to obsolete ITER before it’s even finished. Its advantage lies in the application of “high temperature” superconductors made with rare earth copper and barium oxide (aka ReBCO).

Superconductors move electric current with almost zero loss (much more efficiently than copper, for example). And they are essential for making strong electromagnets. Commonwealth has discovered that by making its magnets using a special tape of copper and barium oxide (like the tape found in a VHS tape), it can achieve stronger magnetic fields than expected at ITER. , but at 1 / 20th of the scale.

While ITER’s primary magnets (called solenoids) will weigh around 400 tonnes and achieve fields of over 12 tesla, Commonwealth is considering 15-tonne magnets, each using 300 km of ReBCO thin-film tape, which will generate 20 tesla (at for comparison, a magnetic resonance imaging machine is 1.5 tesla).

“This unlocks the fusion machine,” explains Mumgaard. CES tested the magnets last summer and declared it “proof” that the science of fusion is now practically over and all that remains is to build the reactor. “We understand the material well and believe we can do it in three years,” says Mumgaard. “By 2030, we will see the merger on the grid.”

CES is about to build its fusion machine at a 47-acre site in Massachusetts, and is already working to supply thousands of miles of ReBCO tape. Could the availability of rare earth become a limiting factor in the deployment of fusion? No, said Mumgaard. “A fusion power plant will contain less rare earth than a wind turbine. Fusion is not about a resource that you need to mine or pump. It is a technology.

There should be room for more than one merger winner. Other leaders include General Fusion, based in Canada and backed by Jeff Bezos, which has raised $ 130 million this year. Neal and Linden Blue are other notable billionaires in the fusion game, who own the San Diego-based company General Atomics, which for decades has operated a research tokamak on behalf of the DOE, and which delivered this year to ITER the entrails of its tokamak electromagnets. a central 1000 tonne solenoid. And there’s TAE Energy of California, which has experimented with $ 1 billion over the past decade and raised $ 130 million during the pandemic.

Fusion technology may have made its debut in government-funded labs, but its realization will have to rely on private funding. Amy Roma, a partner at Hogan Lovells in Washington, DC, says the bill currently in limbo Build Back Better would have included $ 875 million for advanced nuclear, but for now the industry will have to settle for a new advanced reactor demonstration office under the Ministry of Energy, funded by the recent infrastructure law. Zero-carbon nuclear would also benefit from President Biden’s recent executive order calling for federal government energy purchases to be “net zero” by 2030.

Legendary tech investor Steve Jurvetson, a Commonwealth Fusion funder who wrote his first check in favor of fusion research 25 years ago, is almost dazed that this long-delayed dream could soon become a reality. “There are a lot of naysayers until it’s done. Then they say it’s obvious.

Royan de Mithril says he’s already working on adjusting his framework to consider how different the world will be when the merger is real – “Think about the opportunities for water desalination and fertilizer production. saving water overnight, and therefore saving agriculture. “It is all part of mankind’s path, he said,” to continue to prove that Malthus was a fool. ”

MORE FORBESThe New Nuclear: How a $ 600 Million Fusion Power Unicorn Plans to Beat Solar
MORE FORBESThe silent billionaires behind the US predatory drone that killed Iranian Soleimani


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The future of niche commerce is to build brands around tribes https://villageunderforest.com/the-future-of-niche-commerce-is-to-build-brands-around-tribes/ Fri, 31 Dec 2021 23:16:54 +0000 https://villageunderforest.com/the-future-of-niche-commerce-is-to-build-brands-around-tribes/ Research has shown that there is a strong group of one hundred million consumers spending $ 19 billion … [+] every year on gardening as a hobby, “it’s a pocket of enthusiasts hiding in plain sight, growing their own kale.” Getty Images The adulthood of millennials has been defined by decent politics, an economic recession, […]]]>

The adulthood of millennials has been defined by decent politics, an economic recession, and massive debt, caused by the huge costs of higher education. My oldest daughter, in her thirties, fits this bill. And like many other of her cohorts who look to passionate projects to balance their stressed lives, she chose gardening. From winter seedlings to raised beds, she has transformed her Minneapolis city garden into a thriving vegetable patch, cultivating the value of the entire alphabet of greens.

So it was not a total surprise to read excerpts from a National Gardening Association (NGA) survey showing that a quarter of all gardening spending in the $ 52 billion gardening industry came from the Generation Y, although they have less wealth than the older generations. A 2020 study published in the Journal of Landscape and Urban Planning found that “gardening promotes high emotional well-being, including feelings of happiness and meaning.” And a 2021 survey found that gardening multiple times a week was associated with “higher levels of perceived well-being, less stress, and more physical activity.” And incidentally, he supplied me with copious amounts of basil for enough pesto to get us through the long winters of Minnesota.

Capital follows enthusiasts

A recent article in Fast Company magazine demonstrated just how fertile this category is perceived to be, even among the most prominent venture capitalists among us. The Los Angeles-based Chernin Group (TCG), founded by the former President and COO of News Corp. Peter Chernin and Goldman Sachs

SG
Alum Jesse Jacobs has spent the last decade developing digital startups built around niche communities, or “tribes.” Barstool Sports, Hello Sunshine, MeatEater, Food52, and Crunchyroll are some of the brands they’ve helped extend far beyond multimedia content in e-commerce, experiences, and more.

TCG has raised a new $ 1.2 billion fund to continue to find and save the under-explored corners of Web 2.0 as it simultaneously seeks to adapt those same principles and strategies to mainstream Web3. And one of the first categories of their sites is the very fragmented gardening industry, which they think can start to build a great content commerce business. Their research has shown that there is a strong group of one hundred million consumers who spend $ 19 billion a year on gardening as a hobby. Luke Beatty, a TCG partner, notes that “it’s a pocket of enthusiasts hiding in plain sight, growing their own kale”.

Early discussions, as reported by Fast Company, suggest that TCG is considering building a gardening business into a “house of brands” allowing other content creators to integrate the founder’s infrastructure. They also plan to expand into flower gardening and home ownership, as well as merchandise (garden tools, clothing), television, and physical retail.

Certainly not the first

There have been other retail entrepreneurs who have considered similar efforts. Billionaire founder of Urban Outfitters, Richard Hayne had a similar vision in 2008 with the launch of Terrain. It has been described as “a lifestyle brand for the garden, home and outdoors deeply rooted in nature and plant life”. By this time, my design firm had already designed a successful retail prototype in the category, and I used that as a “business card” to set up a meeting with Mr. Hayne, offering to do an “audit. swat ‘of the concept and share my thoughts with him and his staff. The “free offer” was accepted, leading to a memorable meeting with Richard Hayne.

The flagship store was built in Glen Mills, Pennsylvania, and at the time, they were planning to roll out the prototype nationwide. The over-the-top concept was breathtaking, merging home and garden to create an immersive natural experience featuring various native plants, planters and all-weather furniture, decorations and gifts. It differed from the regular garden center in that the interior and exterior of the space was more of a series of rooms or scenarios that showcased and sold the products.

It was as if RH (Restoration Hardware) were now creating a gardening concept. Educational classes, a beautiful restaurant, and well-designed private label gardening accessories were all extensions of the brand. The Terrain brand still exists today, online and offline, both as independent stores and as a member of the Urban Outfitters Anthropologie chain.

Like the efforts of the Chernin Group and Terrain, I expect many such concepts to take root in the future. Food shortages, sensitivities to common farming practices, and the simple desire to get our hands on the land will drive many of us to dig it.


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Whitmer OK extends development tax incentives for 5 years https://villageunderforest.com/whitmer-ok-extends-development-tax-incentives-for-5-years/ Tue, 28 Dec 2021 17:03:23 +0000 https://villageunderforest.com/whitmer-ok-extends-development-tax-incentives-for-5-years/ Lansing – Michigan developers with “transformational” plans to redevelop brownfields may continue to seek tax incentives after Gov. Gretchen Whitmer and the legislature extended the program for another five years. The state’s economic development board can approve new projects until 2027, instead of 2022, under a bill signed last week. The law, which was enacted […]]]>

Lansing – Michigan developers with “transformational” plans to redevelop brownfields may continue to seek tax incentives after Gov. Gretchen Whitmer and the legislature extended the program for another five years.

The state’s economic development board can approve new projects until 2027, instead of 2022, under a bill signed last week. The law, which was enacted in 2017, allows developers to retain income taxes and withholding taxes from people who live and work on sites as well as sales taxes associated with construction.

Brownfields are contaminated, dilapidated, functionally obsolete, or historic properties.

In 2018, the state granted Bedrock, a commercial real estate company owned by Dan Gilbert, $ 386 million in tax relief for a multibillion-dollar development project in Detroit that includes a 58-story building on the site. of the former JL Hudson department store. . The state authorized $ 30 million in incentives in 2019 to redevelop a long-closed stationery in Vicksburg.

An overall cap of $ 1 billion on incentives remains intact. But lawmakers changed the law to allow the Michigan Strategic Fund to approve a brownfield transformation plan that captures up to 100% income taxes instead of 50%, if there is a written, binding agreement. on affordable housing with the municipality.


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It’s time to decide what to do with the Decas School of Wareham https://villageunderforest.com/its-time-to-decide-what-to-do-with-the-decas-school-of-wareham/ Sun, 26 Dec 2021 22:20:52 +0000 https://villageunderforest.com/its-time-to-decide-what-to-do-with-the-decas-school-of-wareham/ WAREHAM – Selectmen Tuesday will review candidates for the Decas School Steering Committee, created by municipal assembly vote to provide recommendations on the Decas School building and new use of the property. The building is being replaced by Wareham Primary School, which will open to students from Decas and Minot on January 3. Candidates for […]]]>

WAREHAM – Selectmen Tuesday will review candidates for the Decas School Steering Committee, created by municipal assembly vote to provide recommendations on the Decas School building and new use of the property.

The building is being replaced by Wareham Primary School, which will open to students from Decas and Minot on January 3.

Candidates for the seven-person committee that will be considered at this week’s meeting include Jared Fredrickson, Tracie Williams and MaryJane Driscoll, who were recommended by town meeting article petitioners, and Damon Solomon and Jared Chadwick who were recommended by elected officials.

The property at 760 Main Street comprises 15.5 acres.

The committee will be appointed by Selectmen, and will include three from among the appointments made by the applicants for the section, one from among the appointments made by the Board of the Council on Aging, one from among the appointments made by the Capital Planning Committee, one from among the appointments made by the Community Preservation Committee, and one from among the appointments made by Selectmen.


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