Associated building – Village Under Forest http://villageunderforest.com/ Mon, 21 Nov 2022 13:15:00 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://villageunderforest.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-2021-06-25T171231.357-150x150.png Associated building – Village Under Forest http://villageunderforest.com/ 32 32 Plata Business Association Awards CCPS $30,000 for Fine and Performing Arts Programs | details https://villageunderforest.com/plata-business-association-awards-ccps-30000-for-fine-and-performing-arts-programs-details/ Mon, 21 Nov 2022 13:15:00 +0000 https://villageunderforest.com/plata-business-association-awards-ccps-30000-for-fine-and-performing-arts-programs-details/ Plata Business Association awards $30,000 to CCPS for fine and performing arts programs At the Nov. 15 meeting of the Charles County Board of Education, Keith Grasso of the Island Music Company presented a check for $30,000 to the county’s public school fine and performing arts programs of Charles (CCPS). The donation is a collective […]]]>

Plata Business Association awards $30,000 to CCPS for fine and performing arts programs

At the Nov. 15 meeting of the Charles County Board of Education, Keith Grasso of the Island Music Company presented a check for $30,000 to the county’s public school fine and performing arts programs of Charles (CCPS). The donation is a collective effort of local and national businesses helping to increase resources for the fine and performing arts program at CCPS.

Every year since 2013, the La Plata Business Association (LPBA) partners with CCPS to host a community-wide fine and performing arts event called Rocktoberfest. This year’s event was expected to be one of the best since the COVID-19 pandemic suspended the in-person gathering but was canceled due to heavy rain, Grasso said. There were nearly 60 sponsors for the event scheduled for this year. “This year was designed to be the best Rocktoberfest ever, and I can control everything but the weather,” Grasso said.

The event allows community members to listen to live music, shop from local vendors, and hang out with friends and family. “It’s an amazing community event with three or four different stages set up and vendors around the plaza,” said CCPS Fine and Performing Arts Content Specialist Tim Bodamer.

The event has “bands performing and spinning on stages performing for the community, children and family activities, and CCPS high school marching bands and marching bands,” Bodamer said.

Money raised from Rocktoberfest goes to CCPS’s Fine and Performing Arts programs. “We went from donating $1,500 the first event to donating $60,000 the last time we had an event; before COVID,” Bodamer said.

Bodamer presented what the LPBA donation has been used for in the past. Some uses included providing instruments to students in need; add to CCPS’s library of instruments, provide art supplies to enhance classrooms, hire clinicians to work with students and teachers in classroom instruction and much more.

About the SCPC

Charles County Public Schools provides 27,000 K-12 students with an academically stimulating education. Located in Southern Maryland, Charles County Public Schools has 37 schools that provide a technologically advanced, progressive, and high-quality education that builds character, prepares for leadership, and prepares students for life, careers, and life. ‘Higher Education.

The Charles County Public School System does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, religion, national origin, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, age, or disability in its employment programs, activities or practices. For inquiries, please contact Kathy Kiessling, Title IX/ADA/Section 504 Coordinator (Students) or Nikial M. Majors, Title IX/ADA/Section 504 Coordinator (Employees/Adults), at Charles County Public Schools, Jesse L Starkey Administration Building, PO Box 2770, La Plata, MD 20646; 301-932-6610/301-870-3814. For special accommodations, call 301-934-7230 or TDD 1-800-735-2258 two weeks prior to the event.

CCPS provides equal and non-discriminatory access to school facilities in accordance with its Rules for the Use of Facilities to designated youth groups (including, but not limited to, Boy Scouts).

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Minutes of the National Armaments Directors Meeting Under the Auspices of the Ukrainian Defense Contact Group > U.S. Department of Defense > Communiqué https://villageunderforest.com/minutes-of-the-national-armaments-directors-meeting-under-the-auspices-of-the-ukrainian-defense-contact-group-u-s-department-of-defense-communique/ Fri, 18 Nov 2022 18:08:57 +0000 https://villageunderforest.com/minutes-of-the-national-armaments-directors-meeting-under-the-auspices-of-the-ukrainian-defense-contact-group-u-s-department-of-defense-communique/ Department of Defense spokesman, Lt. Cmdr. Tim Gorman provided the following statement: Undersecretary of Defense for Acquisition and Sustainment Dr. William A. LaPlante chaired the second meeting of National Armaments Directors (NADs) of member nations of the Ukrainian Defense Contact Group (UDCG) on 18 November in Brussels. He was joined by NADs and representatives from […]]]>

Department of Defense spokesman, Lt. Cmdr. Tim Gorman provided the following statement:

Undersecretary of Defense for Acquisition and Sustainment Dr. William A. LaPlante chaired the second meeting of National Armaments Directors (NADs) of member nations of the Ukrainian Defense Contact Group (UDCG) on 18 November in Brussels. He was joined by NADs and representatives from 45 countries, the European Union and the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO). Participants discussed accelerating the procurement, production, supply and sustainment of capabilities critical to Ukraine’s defense against illegal Russian invasion.

Building on consensus at the last UDCG NAD meeting held in September 2022, the NADs discussed efforts in four key areas: (1) long-range ground fires, (2) defense systems aerial, (3) air-to-ground systems capabilities, and (3) sustainment support. In each area, the U.S. delegation and international partners shared progress in mapping current global production capacity of key capabilities and components, and identifying associated supply chain and production constraints. . The discussion set the stage for member countries to work together to increase production and identify opportunities to create interoperability between systems. Additionally, the NADs discussed building sustainment capabilities in Ukraine, including advanced repair activities, access to spare parts and other sustainment tools.

Under Secretary LaPlante noted the unprecedented nature of this effort, which includes significant domestic investments and support to countries’ respective industrial bases, as well as multinational coordination to build defense production and defense capability. support. The NADs discussed innovative solutions to collaborate at the multinational level, including mechanisms to aggregate demand for certain capabilities, establish international funds to invest in production and supply, identify co-production opportunities with the defense industrial base Ukrainian and provide additional support and maintenance. support for international coordination centres. The NADs agreed to meet again in early 2023 to share progress on these and other initiatives.

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Schumer lifts Democrats with a majority stunner https://villageunderforest.com/schumer-lifts-democrats-with-a-majority-stunner/ Tue, 15 Nov 2022 05:08:00 +0000 https://villageunderforest.com/schumer-lifts-democrats-with-a-majority-stunner/ By MARY CLARE JALONICK and LISA MASCARO, Associated Press WASHINGTON (AP) — Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer was eating Peking duck at a Chinese restaurant with family and friends on the west side of Manhattan Saturday night when an aide called with urgent news: The Democrats would win the Nevada Senate seat and retain their […]]]>

By MARY CLARE JALONICK and LISA MASCARO, Associated Press

WASHINGTON (AP) — Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer was eating Peking duck at a Chinese restaurant with family and friends on the west side of Manhattan Saturday night when an aide called with urgent news: The Democrats would win the Nevada Senate seat and retain their majority.

The restaurant burst into joy when the news was beamed onto a TV screen and a group celebrating a birthday sent them a piece of cake.

But Schumer didn’t stay to celebrate. He soon rushed across town for an impromptu, late-night press conference in the lobby of a building near his office.

“I will be Majority Leader again,” he told the cameras, almost dazed.

political cartoons

The 2022 election was “a victory and a vindication for Democrats,” he said.

It was vindication for the often underrated Schumer, in particular, who won a string of unexpected legislative victories this year as he navigated the slim 50-50 majority of Democrats. But the midterm elections held the biggest surprise of all, as his party managed to defend its seats despite historic trends and President Joe Biden’s low approval ratings. The result: two more years of tight Senate control.

Even a narrow majority has huge implications for Biden and his party as the Senate confirms nominees and executive justices, including for the Supreme Court if there are vacancies over the next two years. Democrats will be able to decide which bills to bring to the Senate as Republicans — who may control the House — politically defeat the president ahead of the 2024 election.

“Look, I was on top of every single one of these campaigns,” Schumer said in an interview in his Capitol office Monday, a fire roaring behind him and his joy still evident. He said he thinks the Democrats won because they had better candidates and because of their legislative achievements – allowing the government to negotiate some prescription drug costs, investments to fight climate change and a bipartisan effort to tighten who can own guns, among other measures that have been overtaken. Summer.

“That was always my plan,” Schumer said. “Get things done, focus on those things, and don’t get distracted.”

Finally, he said, voters rejected anti-democratic efforts by Republicans who supported former President Donald Trump’s efforts to void the last election.

“We were about to see autocracy eat away at our democracy,” said Schumer, who noted that the House committee investigating the Jan. 6 Capitol uprising had called attention to the attack over the summer, with multiple hearings and footage of Trump supporters beating up police getting plenty of airtime. “American voters said, I don’t like it. I will reject it. And the American people saved us.

In his own election autopsy on Monday, Republican Leader Mitch McConnell saw things differently, describing the Democrats’ narrow victory in the Senate and yet-to-be-named control of the House as confirmation of a “tightly divided nation.” Presenting the case directly to Georgia voters, who will decide a runoff in December between Democratic Sen. Raphael Warnock and Republican nominee Herschel Walker, McConnell claimed that Democratic policy failures have led to high inflation.

If Warnock wins, the Democrats will have a 51-49 majority. And Schumer will have protected every one of his incumbents in the election – a staggering feat.

First elected to the House in 1980 and then to the Senate in 1998, Schumer has long been known for his political acumen — he was in charge of winning Democratic efforts in the Senate in 2006 and 2008 — and as a master of the communication. But for his colleagues, the results of the midterm elections also confirm his skills as a legislative leader. Although it has been criticized by Republicans and some progressive groups for dropping items from the Democrats’ wish list, the party had achievements to highlight in the election, and lawmakers say it gave them a boost. during the summer.

“This is the year of Chuck Schumer,” said Sen. Chris Murphy, D-Conn., who led bipartisan negotiations on gun legislation. The election wins were “set up by a bunch of wins that ended up motivating both swing and grassroots voters,” Murphy said, particularly the sweeping health, climate and economic package Democrats passed after that Schumer negotiated one-on-one with moderate Democrat Joe. Manchi n of West Virginia, which single-handedly killed an earlier version of the legislation.

Murphy said Schumer’s style is “totally unique, and he’s very well suited to a 50-50 Senate,” in that he knows when to micromanage and when to cool down. Murphy said he spoke to Schumer several times a day as he negotiated the gun bill, but always let Murphy take the lead.

Schumer brags about his communication skills, noting that he has all the Democratic senators on speed dial on his famous flip phone. And he knows a lot of their numbers by heart, he said.

“Every member calls me,” he said. “They don’t go through the staff. They can talk to me directly, no email.

Brian Fallon, a former Schumer aide who is now the executive director of Demand Justice, a liberal advocacy group that supports the court’s expansion, said Schumer “has become his own over the past two years” in terms of legislative maneuvers. At no time was that more evident than this summer, Fallon said, when Schumer unexpectedly announced the deal with Manchin on the broad package of bills and caught angry Republicans by surprise.

“He’s had his own kind of Harry Reid moment the last few months,” Fallon said, referring to the late Nevada senator and majority leader who was known as one of the Senate’s toughest negotiators before passing the torch to Schumer. Reid died last year.

The next two years won’t be easy, even if Warnock wins and gives Democrats a crucial extra seat. Several Democratic incumbents are up for re-election in 2024, and Republicans still have a good chance of winning a majority in the House, making negotiations more difficult for Schumer.

“So where do we go from here?” asked Schumer. The Democratic leader said he intended to sit down with McConnell and try to find places to get along, even though the two men have traditionally had a frosty relationship.

“I’m going to make a real effort to do everything we can,” Schumer said, echoing what he’s said since taking over as chief two years ago. “We have to focus on getting things done. This means that we are going to have to make compromises.

Copyright 2022 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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Tropical Storm Nicole knocks beachfront homes into the ocean https://villageunderforest.com/tropical-storm-nicole-knocks-beachfront-homes-into-the-ocean/ Thu, 10 Nov 2022 17:58:21 +0000 https://villageunderforest.com/tropical-storm-nicole-knocks-beachfront-homes-into-the-ocean/ VERO BEACH, Fla. (AP) — Tropical Storm Nicole toppled several homes into the Atlantic Ocean on Thursday and threatened a row of high-rise condominiums in locations where Hurricane Ian washed away the dikes and other remaining protection only a few weeks ago. “Several coastal homes in Wilbur-by-the-Sea have collapsed and several other properties are in […]]]>

VERO BEACH, Fla. (AP) — Tropical Storm Nicole toppled several homes into the Atlantic Ocean on Thursday and threatened a row of high-rise condominiums in locations where Hurricane Ian washed away the dikes and other remaining protection only a few weeks ago.

“Several coastal homes in Wilbur-by-the-Sea have collapsed and several other properties are in imminent danger,” Volusia County Sheriff Mike Chitwood said in a social media post. In the Daytona Beach area, most bridges to the beach have been closed to all but essential personnel and a curfew has been put in effect, he said.

Wilbur-by-the-Sea is an unincorporated community on a barrier island with only beachfront homes. Next door in Daytona Beach Shores, a strip of high-rise condominiums were evacuated before landing of Nicole because their seawalls had collapsed and the beach had all but disappeared.

The Marbella Condominium Owners Association had just spent $240,000 to temporarily rebuild the seawall Ian destroyed in September, said Connie Hale Gellner, whose family owns a unit there. Live video from cameras in the building showed Nicole’s storm surge sweeping him away.

“We knew it wasn’t meant to stop a hurricane, it was only meant to stop erosion,” Gellner said. But after Nicole, the building’s pool deck “is basically in the ocean,” Gellner said. “The problem is that we no longer have a beach. So even if we wanted to rebuild, they would probably condemn the building because the water just splashes on the building.

Nicole covered nearly the entire weather-weary state of Florida while reaching Georgia and the Carolinas before dawn Thursday. Tropical storm-force winds extended up to 450 miles (720 kilometers) from the center in some directions as Nicole turned north over central Florida.

Two people were killed by electrocution when they touched downed power lines in the Orlando area, the Orange County Sheriff’s Office said.

Early damage assessments showed how Nicole left several beachfront properties teetering above the water. The Volusia Sheriff’s Office released a photo of a home where erosion had undermined the ground all the way to its main ocean-facing wall. A roofed platform jutted out over the eroded slope supported by narrow beams.

Krista Dowling Goodrich, who manages 130 rental homes in Daytona Beach Shores as director of sales and marketing at Salty Dog Vacations, saw the waterfront disappear behind some properties as evacuations were underway just before the storm hit. She was trying to get to the scene on Thursday morning to see how they were doing.

“While we were there, the whole yard started to collapse into the ocean. It went all the way to the house,” she said. The water also compromised the remaining land between a row of tall condominiums nearby, she said.

At Daytona Beach Shoreswhere beachfront bathrooms attached to the city’s Beach Safety Ocean Rescue building collapsed, officials deemed several multi-story coastal residential buildings unsafe and went door-to-door telling people to grab their belongings and leave.

“These were the tall skyscrapers. So people who didn’t want to leave, they were physically forcing them out because it wasn’t safe,” Goodrich said. “I’m worried about the infrastructure in the area at the moment because once the dykes are gone they won’t just let people in…there will be a lot of displaced people for a while.”

Authorities had warned that storm surge from Nicole could further erode many beaches. The rare November hurricane prompted authorities to close airports and theme parks and order evacuations.

Nicole made landfall as a Category 1 hurricane around 3 a.m. Thursday near Vero Beach but caused no significant damage there, officials said Thursday. Part of a fishing pier was washed away in Lauderdale-by-the-Sea. But the bulk of the storm hit north of its center. As of 10 a.m., Nicole’s maximum sustained winds had dropped to 85 km/h (50 mph), centered between Tampa and Orlando, moving west-northwest at nearly 26 km/h (16 mph ).

The storm left southern Florida sunny and calm as it moved up the peninsula, but could dump up to 6 inches of rain on the Blue Ridge Mountains by Friday, the hurricane center said. Flash and urban flooding will be possible as rain spreads across the eastern Ohio Valley, mid-Atlantic and New England through Saturday.

Nicole was the first hurricane to hit the Bahamas since Hurricane Dorian, a Category 5 storm that devastated the archipelago. in 2019. For Floridians tired of the stormit is only the third November hurricane to hit their shores since record keeping began in 1853.

Forty-five of Florida’s 67 counties were under a state of emergency. President Joe Biden also approved a declaration of emergency for the Seminole Tribe of Florida, ordering federal aid to the tribal nation. Many Seminoles live on six reservations across the state. The tribe also owns the Hard Rock Cafe franchise, with several of its hotels and casinos on Nicole’s way.

Gov. Ron DeSantis said at a Thursday news conference in Tallahassee that about 333,000 electric customers were without power by mid-morning, or about 2.9% of the state’s total. DeSantis said there are 17,000 powerline workers ready to begin restoring power and many other assets, including lifeboats and vehicles, will be deployed as needed.

“We are ready and have the resources to meet any post-storm needs that may arise,” the governor said.

Disney World and Universal Orlando Resort said they likely won’t open as planned on Thursday. Nearly two dozen school districts were closing schools and 15 shelters had opened along Florida’s east coast, the governor said.

Parts of Florida were devastated by Hurricane Ianwhich hit as a Category 4 storm. Ian destroyed homes and damaged cropsincluding orange groves, across the state – damage many are still dealing with – and sent a storm surge up to 13 feet (4 meters) ashore, causing widespread destruction.

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Frisaro reported from Fort Lauderdale. Curt Anderson in St. Petersburg contributed to this story.

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See the latest AP coverage on our climate change and its impacts here: https://apnews.com/hub/climate-and-environment

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BACKGROUNDER: Biden-Harris Administration Makes Historic Investment in US National Labs, Announces Net-Zero Game Changers Initiative https://villageunderforest.com/backgrounder-biden-harris-administration-makes-historic-investment-in-us-national-labs-announces-net-zero-game-changers-initiative/ Fri, 04 Nov 2022 09:00:00 +0000 https://villageunderforest.com/backgrounder-biden-harris-administration-makes-historic-investment-in-us-national-labs-announces-net-zero-game-changers-initiative/ Today, the Biden-Harris administration announced $1.5 billion under President Biden’s Cut Inflation Act to build and upgrade America’s National Laboratories and advance American leadership in fields of science, research and innovation. Strengthening our national laboratories will increase economic growth, create well-paying local jobs, and help attract the skilled workers needed to develop clean energy solutions […]]]>

Today, the Biden-Harris administration announced $1.5 billion under President Biden’s Cut Inflation Act to build and upgrade America’s National Laboratories and advance American leadership in fields of science, research and innovation. Strengthening our national laboratories will increase economic growth, create well-paying local jobs, and help attract the skilled workers needed to develop clean energy solutions and other technologies that will reduce costs for families, improve the lives of people and respond to the climate crisis. Additionally, the White House announced a new report that identifies five initial priorities that will help the United States meet the President’s goal of reducing greenhouse gases (GHGs) by 50-52 percent by 2030 and achieve net zero emissions. no later than 2050. To drive innovation in these technologies, the administration is also today launching the Net-Zero Game Changers initiative.

President Biden’s economic plan has secured transformational investments in American-made clean energy, including wind, solar, electric vehicles, batteries, and more. Investing in these made-in-USA solutions is essential to ensuring that the United States remains the global leader in clean technology and that American workers and communities benefit from the historic economic opportunities and well-paying jobs that come from building a clean energy economy. American investments in scientific research, including through our system of world-class national laboratories, are central to America’s economic competitiveness and enable innovation across the economy. Today’s funding announcements will provide a long-awaited boost to 13 Department of Energy (DOE) National Laboratories that have been at the heart of major scientific discoveries and continue to be essential to advancing safety energy, economic and national of the United States.

Increased funding for National Laboratories under the Cut Inflation Act will support innovative research in clean technologies, including those identified by the Game Changers Initiative. These investments will help the United States meet its climate goals while reducing energy costs for American families, advancing America’s energy security, and creating well-paying jobs.

Today, Senior Advisor for Clean Energy Innovation and Implementation John Podesta, Secretary of Energy Jennifer Granholm, Deputy Director of the Office of Science and Technology Policy for Energy Sally Benson , and other senior White House and administration officials will highlight these announcements at the state Department of Energy. State-of-the-art Argonne National Laboratory in Lemont, Illinois.

Today’s announcements include:

Increased infrastructure funding for national laboratories: The US DOE announced $1.5 billion for fiscal year 2022 to build and upgrade science facilities, upgrade infrastructure, and address deferred maintenance projects at its Office of Science-run national laboratories. This historic investment will help advance the Biden-Harris administration’s vision to use solutions-focused research and innovation to address the nation’s greatest challenges and achieve the President’s ambitious climate goals. Projects include continuing to build everything from state-of-the-art electron colliders to the world’s fastest supercomputers, as well as upgrading critical electrical, fire safety and HVAC systems infrastructure to ensure laboratories DOE nationals are modern, safe, energy efficient and reliable.

For more information on the new funding for national laboratories, click here.

Advancing the Game Changers Initiative: The Net-Zero Game Changers Initiative is accelerating game-changing climate innovations by helping the United States meet the President’s goal of reaching net-zero emissions by 2050 at the latest. To kick off the initiative, the White House Office of Climate Policy, Office of Science and Technology Policy, and Office of Management and Budget are jointly releasing a new report, American innovation to meet 2050 climate goals, which describes 37 breakthrough R&D opportunities identified in federal agencies. Priorities include opportunities for short-term gains, investments in underserved communities through the Justice40 initiative, and long-term transformation of the energy system. The Administration will kick-start clean energy innovation with five near-term priorities:

  • Efficient heating and cooling of buildings: Building heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) is responsible for more than half of the energy use of residential buildings and almost one-fifth of the energy use of commercial buildings. While buildings in the United States have become more efficient in recent years, most existing heating and cooling equipment is still inefficient and uses climate-warming refrigerants, which harm consumers and contribute to climate change. Innovative technologies such as highly efficient heat pumps and advanced refrigerants could solve many problems simultaneously. In addition to GHG reductions, the benefits of successful innovation for efficient heating and cooling include significantly reducing indoor air pollution, tripling or quadrupling energy efficiency, boosting manufacturing national security, supporting well-paying jobs in our communities, promoting national and energy security, and reducing household consumption. energy bills. Additional innovation — coupled with financial incentives from President Biden’s Cut Inflation Act — will help reduce the upfront costs of these devices and make the clean option the easier option.
  • Aviation Net-Zero: Greenhouse gas emissions from air travel are expected to increase in the United States and around the world. At the same time, aviation – especially long-distance travel – is one of the toughest sectors for emissions reductions today. There are several options for cleaner aviation, including new carbon-neutral fuels, advanced biofuels, and electrification (including battery-electric and fuel-cell concepts). The U.S. public and private sectors are also exploring entirely new concepts for air travel, such as small electric vertical take-off and landing planes. Innovation will make zero-emission fuels and vehicles competitive with today’s aviation, while reducing the aviation industry’s reliance on fossil fuels.
  • Net zero electricity network and electrification: The original US electrical grid was not designed for today’s needs, including supporting widespread electrification of vehicles, new appliances, and industrial processes; deploy renewable energy on a large scale; and withstand the impacts of climate-induced extreme weather conditions. To ensure the availability of clean, affordable and reliable electricity while rapidly electrifying new parts of the economy to reduce our dependence on fossil fuels, we must fundamentally transform the planning and operations of electricity distribution and transmission networks. 2050. The grid of the future must be able to detect and adapt to changing electricity demand and external factors in real time, while decarbonizing and increasing the total capacity of the grid. In addition to enabling electrification and integration of clean energy sources, these innovations will also reduce the total cost to achieve net-zero emissions across the economy and increase grid resilience.
  • Industrial products and fuels for a net zero circular economy: Industrial processes represent some of the toughest barriers to reaching net zero by 2050. This priority area focuses on new ways to make materials and fuels that reduce GHGs, increase efficiency and reduce waste. It includes solutions to reduce GHGs and increase the efficiency of industrial process heating, materials production (such as metals, cement, plastics and chemicals) and water treatment processes. It also includes pathways to producing net-zero electrofuels – synthetic fuels made from clean electricity – that could be used as energy-dense transportation fuels. Advanced industrial processes also include the systems and technological innovations required for energy-intensive water treatment processes such as desalination and wastewater treatment. Producing all of these materials and fuels in a net zero economy will require the development of innovative chemicals, the strengthening of supply chains, and the design of processes and products to provide the same or better services to people who care about recycling and reuse.
  • Large Scale Fusion Energy: Fusion, the same process that powers the sun and stars, has the potential to transform the energy system. This could provide clean, reliable electricity in abundance anywhere in the United States or the world, and could create a whole new industry and the associated workforce. Fusion could potentially meet much of the demand for electricity and help eliminate GHG emissions from energy-intensive industrial processes, synthetic fuel production and desalination. For these reasons, it could have impacts far beyond electricity generation. Because it relies on abundant, clean fuel sources, it can benefit national security and improve air quality in areas historically burdened by fossil fuel generation.

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Cox’s dismissal sends message to players https://villageunderforest.com/coxs-dismissal-sends-message-to-players/ Mon, 31 Oct 2022 21:15:23 +0000 https://villageunderforest.com/coxs-dismissal-sends-message-to-players/ The news of Brenton Cox Jr.Sunday’s dismissal from the Florida football program surprised the masses when it was revealed on Monday, considering Cox was a former five-star prospect who had started every game this season in what was to be his final season of college football. Florida head coach Billy Napier chose […]]]>


The news of Brenton Cox Jr.Sunday’s dismissal from the Florida football program surprised the masses when it was revealed on Monday, considering Cox was a former five-star prospect who had started every game this season in what was to be his final season of college football.

Florida head coach Billy Napier chose not to release details of what led to Cox’s departure from Gainesville, leaving those outside the UF football complex to wonder what led to the parting ways.

“I don’t know if we would be specific about the cause of the decision. I think it’s more of a cumulative effect here,” Napier said. “We keep that in the house.”

Cox is not the first player to be fired from the Florida program, although it should be noted that many of the previous dismissals in recent history were due to legal issues, which is not the case with Cox from what Swamp247 learned from the situation.

As for Napier, he’s not the first UF head coach in his inaugural season with plans to fire a high-caliber player.

Former UF head coach Will Muschamp has fired senior cornerback Janoris Jenkins after his third arrest in 24 months, the latest straw being a misdemeanor possession charge for less than 20 grams of marijuana. Jenkins was coming off a season in which he was named an All-SEC first-team selection by the Associated Press and was considered a potential first-round NFL pick prior to his removal from the program. Jenkins, a Pahokee native, finished his UF career with eight steals and he was ultimately selected in the second round of the NFL Draft by the St. Louis Rams.

At the time, Muschamp was acutely aware of Jenkins’ talent despite his arrival in Gainesville, but it was important for Muschamp to set a precedent that continued run-ins with the law would not be tolerated, let alone go unpunished.

While the situation with Cox is due to internal infractions rather than legal issues, Napier found himself in a similar situation on Sunday: Facing a disciplinary issue on the roster, Napier had to make the difficult decision to part ways. of Cox, a decision he called “in the best interest of the team.”

Either way, it wasn’t an easy decision to make.

“It’s tough stuff, isn’t it? So I think we’re going to keep it all in-house,” Napier said. “I think we want to do what we can to help Brenton go forward, but I think it’s a healthy thing for our team.”

After Napier addressed the situation, the Gators brought in a pair of players – Jaydon Hill and O’Cyrus Torrence – at the desk to address the media, and each player was asked to give their opinion on Cox’s departure from the programme.

Torrence, who followed Napier to Gainesville from Louisiana, couldn’t recall a time with the Ragin’ Cajuns when the head coach had to cut ties with a roster player, let alone a starter within the defense in the No. 1 shirt.

“Not that I can remember,” Torrence said. “We had issues with players, maybe, that I wasn’t aware of, but mostly not.”

He was aware that it is a red flag to those in the building that certain behaviors will not be tolerated, regardless of someone’s status on the list. For the team, from starters to extras, Cox’s firing served as a reminder that playing the game at the Southeastern Conference level is a privilege.

“(It’s) a message that some things you do, you just can’t stand as a team, as a whole,” Torrence said. “We’re in this thing together, so some things you do just can’t be accepted.”

They may no longer be teammates with Cox, but not everyone in the Florida building was eager to turn their backs on their former teammate. Before Napier confirmed the news, the fifth-year safety Trey Dean III refuted Cox’s initial news report by writing “THIS IS FALSE” on his Twitter account. Dean then deleted the tweet before posting a message of solidarity with Cox.

“Don’t Worry 1 I Got You!”, Dean posted on his Twitter account shortly after 1 p.m.

They might not agree with everything Cox did that ultimately led to his firing, but the Gators weren’t keen on stacking Cox, who will enter the transfer portal at the NCAA or will play for his third team in five years. Whatever he decides to do, the Florida players weren’t looking to kick him on the way out.

“It definitely sends a strong message throughout the locker room. He’s my guy. I still cheer for B to this day,” Hill said. “It caught me off guard a bit. I kind of found out when I arrived. It’s coach Napier’s decision, and I leave that up to the coach. We just have to keep growing in team and finish strong, but I wish him the best for sure.”

As for where Florida rotates with Cox no longer in the fold, the Gators will look to use a rotation of Antwaun Powell-Ryland Jr. and Lloyd Summerall III at linebacker JACK.

The latter missed Florida’s 42-20 loss to No. 1-ranked Georgia with a lower-body injury, while the former is approaching the 200 hit mark for the season, having been used consistently in the rotation behind Cox through the first eight games. of the season.

Prior to Florida’s 12 p.m. ET kickoff at College Station with Texas A&M, Powell-Ryland Jr. had 11 tackles, including one for a loss, as well as a forced fumble and three rushing quarterbacks. As the Gators look to close out strong as they enter the final month of the season, they will have to do so without one of their veterans and most experienced defensive players in Cox, although Napier believes those who remain in the chamber are able to fill the void.

“We’ve played a handful of players in this position all year. I think – so AP and Lloyd and those guys will do a really good job,” Napier said. “They’ve played every game for the most part. I know Lloyd was out last week, but we’ll continue in that direction.”

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Miami Marlins opens development academy in Dominican Republic https://villageunderforest.com/miami-marlins-opens-development-academy-in-dominican-republic/ Sat, 29 Oct 2022 10:30:51 +0000 https://villageunderforest.com/miami-marlins-opens-development-academy-in-dominican-republic/ SANTO DOMINGO, Dominican Republic — The Miami Marlins opened their new academy in the Dominican Republic on Friday, where they hope to develop talents such as current National League Cy Young Award contender Sandy Alcantara. Sitting on 35 acres (14 hectares), the academy has three major league regulation playing fields, an area for agility drills, […]]]>

SANTO DOMINGO, Dominican Republic — The Miami Marlins opened their new academy in the Dominican Republic on Friday, where they hope to develop talents such as current National League Cy Young Award contender Sandy Alcantara.

Sitting on 35 acres (14 hectares), the academy has three major league regulation playing fields, an area for agility drills, four tunnels for batting cages, an indoor set of six pitching mounds, a two-story administration building and a residential complex.

The facilities are in Boca Chica, on the outskirts of the Dominican capital, where for years the academies of the New York Mets, St. Louis Cardinals, Texas Rangers, Los Angeles Angels, Minnesota Twins, Phillies have been located. of Philadelphia and the Colorado Rockies.

The opening came three days after St. Louis bench coach Skip Schumaker was named coach of the Marlins, replacing Don Mattingly.

The arrival of Schumaker is not the only novelty in Miami.

Marlins owner Bruce Sherman has confirmed reports that Oz Ocampo, an Astros executive in charge of successful international signings such as Dominicans Framber Valdez and Cristian Javier, Mexican Jose Urquidy and Cuban Yuli Gurriel, will be the new assistant to Kim Ng, Miami’s general manager. .

Ocampo “had tremendous success with the Houston Astros. Well, he’s now working for the Miami Marlins,” Sherman told The Associated Press during the opener.

He said Miami is working to improve its results. This season, the Marlins were 69-93, the 12th time they have finished with a losing record in the last 13 years. The exception was 2020, when they went 31-29.

“It’s not just about a year. It’s long term,” Sherman said.

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Boost your productivity with affinity-focused study groups https://villageunderforest.com/boost-your-productivity-with-affinity-focused-study-groups/ Tue, 25 Oct 2022 22:35:34 +0000 https://villageunderforest.com/boost-your-productivity-with-affinity-focused-study-groups/ Productivity. It’s a destination that research shows can be easier to reach when working with others. The Stanford Learning Lab offers communities centered on several affinity topics, including productivity. ADHD Connections, Fail Better, Focus Fridays, Gently Up The Stream (GUTS), Peer Engagement Network (PEN), Power Hour, and Revise & Resubmit (R&R) are in full swing […]]]>

Productivity. It’s a destination that research shows can be easier to reach when working with others.

The Stanford Learning Lab offers communities centered on several affinity topics, including productivity. ADHD Connections, Fail Better, Focus Fridays, Gently Up The Stream (GUTS), Peer Engagement Network (PEN), Power Hour, and Revise & Resubmit (R&R) are in full swing this fall term. Stanford Learning Lab learning specialists have particular expertise in assisting students with learning differences/disabilities and helping students prepare for and transition to college life on campus, although their services are open to all students. Groups offer continuous registration, so students can join at any time.

Gently in the stream (GUTS)

When LLIT program director Aillie McKeever conceptualized the group of students she dubbed GUTS, she thought of conversations during her five years at Stanford. “I saw a pattern in students who were talking about a desire not to follow the herd, not to conform,” she says. “I really admire that quality in many students of going against the tide or swimming upstream, and I was thinking of a way to honor that quality more and practice it on purpose.”

GUTS currently practices for 30 minutes each week from 1-1:30 p.m. on Tuesdays, and is open to all Stanford undergraduates or graduates. Quotes, excerpts, and sound clips allow students to reflect on the work they are doing. “It’s supposed to be grounding,” says McKeever. “It’s a little time to reconnect with purpose on an individualized basis. Students are also encouraged to think about what they need to reduce or eliminate from their expectations for the week in order to take time to attend to their inner compasses.

Students are encouraged to tune in to what is good for them, their guidance systems, and to honor their voices. That being said, students are encouraged to share their findings with the group or listen to others without feeling obligated to share. “There is encouragement to write what you think. It is really an individualized exercise in community. I recognize that a lot of the work that might come up during this short meeting is personal, and that’s why I don’t want anyone to feel pressured to divulge it,” she says.

A particular focal point is letting go of what isn’t working. “Disruption often comes back – disrupting old, tired patterns that we’ve all learned. Many of our students can see solutions that other people tend to miss, and there isn’t always an audience or room to follow. those instincts. That’s also part of that practice: noticing the solutions and finding ways to implement them,” McKeever says. In the group’s half hour, there’s time and space to do pause and gather regenerative energy to continue developing authentic leadership qualities.

power hour

Students find community around academic productivity in The Learning Lab’s Power Hour — available to all Stanford students and meeting four nights a week — Sunday, Monday, Wednesday, and Thursday — from 8-9 p.m. online.

“So just at a time when most people want to work,” says group host, Stanford sophomore Julia Lasiota. “During the session, students want to work on whatever homework or assignments they have, get together, and first we share the goals we have for this session.”

In particular, Lasiota notes the importance of process goals – setting the intention not necessarily to finish editing an article, but to engage deeply in the editing process for a set amount of time. While it is encouraged to leave the cameras on from a community building and accountability perspective, students can leave them on or off during the session.

Working with others reinforces a sense of responsibility and reduces off-task behavior. “After 50 minutes we reflect on how the session went for us, what worked, what didn’t work and whatever else comes to mind about it. what the process was like,” she says. The final thought is critical: the Learning Lab team finds that metacognition of academic work leads to iterating on practices that lead to success and moving away from approaches that aren’t as helpful.

Although she is also the host, Lasiota reaps the benefits: “I can do Power Hour at the same time because I also do my work with others, so I really appreciate having that fixed time in the day. for most of the week where I know I’m going to sit down and do my homework. Honestly, it’s been a huge relief,” she says. “I totally recommend it for other people to join because ‘once you set it in stone and commit to, you know, having that time in your day, you do so much more stuff and you don’t have to worry about them in advance because that you know you will have time for sure.

Lasiota liked to work with friends in informal study places in the past and wanted to become the Power Hour host to provide a regular opportunity for meetings. “I want it to be an inclusive space where you can just share what the process is really about for you,” she says. She invites students to join one or more sessions according to their schedules and needs.

Revise and Resubmit (R&R)

Learning specialist Mitch Dandignac’s goal when creating the Revise & Resubmit (R&R) group was to let writers know they weren’t alone in their struggles: “I wanted to start a writing-only group for graduate students due to my own experience in my thesis and dissertation.During this time, I felt like my writing process was very isolated.

” Graduate. school is a time to grow as an independent and self-sufficient – it’s true – but also, it’s helpful to have resources to break that flow as well and lean on others, so I wanted to create a weekly writing community for graduates here at Stanford,” he says, noting that the group meets Wednesdays from 10-11 a.m. in a hybrid format.

Regarding the name R&R, which is often associated with rest and relaxation, Dandignac says, “It’s an ironic name because if you’re an academic who publishes work, you’re probably very familiar with this expression, revise and resubmit, because we often hear it when we submit our work for publication and it doesn’t pass peer review all the way, and you necessarily have to make some corrections.

In the R&R space, students work diligently on these modifications, and talk about sticking points, aspects of craftsmanship, and what facilitates their processes. Graduate students are encouraged to bring any writing project – whether a thesis, grant proposal, scholarship application, or shorter work for a class – on which work. Students come from all fields.

The group is not only a place to put words on the page, but also to address the emotional and psychological aspects of academic writing. It is a community of shared perseverance. “We sometimes get writer’s block. We run into all these hurdles, but we often think it’s just us doing this or like a select few, but really, it’s just the normal part of the writing process, and everyone received that feedback at a time, or you will at some point, if you are an academic, that you have to revise and resubmit your work. It’s important to try to standardize this process,” says Dandignac.

For the first part of the session, students respond to a prompt like, what do you do when you get writers block?, and then share answers rich in strategies and shared experiences. Then, students embark on the writing process itself and do the work in two 20-minute bursts – whether it’s planning, outlining, editing, or putting new language on the page. .

“We check in at the end, and we try to rely on that social presence and leverage that social presence, the idea that you’re not writing alone in this session. You write alongside other people as a support mechanism and also just for a change of pace,” he says.

Dandignac also sets goals and works on academic writing himself during the session in a spirit of solidarity.

Like all groups of students in the Learning Lab, he declares: “Presence is not compulsory once [start]. I encourage everyone to attend fairly regularly just to make it part of your routine, but you attend the group as needed and use it in whatever way you find most useful.

For more information on all Stanford Learning Lab student groups and to register, please visit: learninglab.stanford.edu/students

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A food system researcher unpacks the narratives leading to a race for new protein sources https://villageunderforest.com/a-food-system-researcher-unpacks-the-narratives-leading-to-a-race-for-new-protein-sources/ Thu, 20 Oct 2022 17:50:31 +0000 https://villageunderforest.com/a-food-system-researcher-unpacks-the-narratives-leading-to-a-race-for-new-protein-sources/ In Silicon Valley and beyond, tech entrepreneurs are making big promises to disrupt our diets. Their aim is to fight world hunger, climate change and animal welfare issues by replacing meat with alternative proteins derived from increasingly distant sources, such as insect larvae, plastic waste or even looks. This race to develop new protein sources […]]]>

In Silicon Valley and beyond, tech entrepreneurs are making big promises to disrupt our diets. Their aim is to fight world hunger, climate change and animal welfare issues by replacing meat with alternative proteins derived from increasingly distant sources, such as insect larvae, plastic waste or even looks. This race to develop new protein sources has become the cutting edge of a growing agrifood innovation space. But are new proteins really the most productive focus for so much attention and investment?

In an attempt to answer that question, Julie Guthman, a UC Santa Cruz professor and food system expert, dove into the tech industry’s protein engineering efforts. In her last paper, she argues that deep-rooted cultural mythologies around protein are embraced and disseminated by tech companies as they commercialize and fundraise for new protein products. And these efforts can obscure other existing food system solutions that could be easily implemented with more support and public awareness.

“There’s so much hype and entrepreneurial interest in developing these new technologies as alternatives without necessarily thinking of other ways to deal with the problem,” Guthman explained. “So what we’re looking at in our latest research is what kinds of assumptions innovators bring to the table in how they present and frame what they do and how those assumptions fit with previous social science research. .”

Guthman and his co-author researched this question using databases, market maps, and industry directories—as well as published schedules of Bay-Area food and agriculture tech events—to compile a complete list of companies working in agribusiness innovation that were either based or tied to Silicon Valley. The team then reviewed information about these companies from websites and media, listened to nearly 100 industry events, and conducted more than 80 interviews with entrepreneurs, investors, and other industry leaders.

The analysis identified 84 companies and products developing food from new sources or new processes, and of these, the vast majority focused on alternative proteins. 24 were working on plant simulations of animal products, 12 were investing in technologies to grow meat at the cellular level, and 27 were using other novel sources to make protein ingredients. The researchers also took a close look at how companies communicate about products like these.

What’s behind the focus on protein?

Guthman says the intense interest in protein development is partly driven by concerns about animal welfare issues and the livestock industry’s carbon footprint. But many companies are also promoting their products as solutions to a looming global protein shortage.

This perceived protein crisis, Guthman says, is one of the biggest myths at play in the industry. The article argues that projections of future protein shortages are largely based on increased demand for animal products among a growing global middle class, but these changing dietary preferences are not the same. than a real global nutritional need.

Another important narrative used to support the development of alternative proteins is the supposed nutritional quality of protein in any form or quantity. Guthman says this ultimately stems from a diet and nutrition culture that promotes the fashionable vilification of other macronutrients, including fats and carbs.

“There’s this popular sentiment that you can eat as much protein as you want, but you should really watch how many carbs or fats you’re eating,” Guthman explained. “Protein somehow manages to stay particularly heroic. There are long stories of protein being associated with masculinity and strength and advertised for energy and growth that may contribute to this perception.

Guthman’s team also found that the next generation of alternative proteins, which are engineered at the molecular level, often use narratives about global needs and inherent nutritional benefits to argue that the molecular building blocks of proteins can be derived. from any source material, including those not traditionally considered food. Guthman says this illustrates how edibility is both physically and socially constructed.

“The industry is trying to convince people that these new proteins will be foods largely by establishing nutritional equivalences that, because they’re proteins, have to be foods,” she said. “But protein is ubiquitous in the environment in many forms that aren’t necessarily food, and it’s not yet clear whether some of these things will actually be digestible.”

Broaden the solution conversation

Guthman speculates that Silicon Valley companies may be attracted to some of these protein narratives, in part because their business models rely on venture capital, and investors seek both profitability and a global impact on short lead times. But as alternative protein products successfully capture the public’s attention, other solutions can be overlooked.

For example, Guthman says many people already consume a lot of protein in their diets and could choose to eat fewer animal products with no negative nutritional impact. Plants also provide abundant, ready-to-use forms of protein without the need for heavy processing. And the livestock industry could be better regulated to improve animal welfare and reduce environmental impacts.

“There are many other issues around proteins that are regulatory or socio-economic in nature that have been just out of the conversation in this rush to develop new technologies,” she said.

Guthman is also concerned about the environmental impact of alternative proteins themselves. While many products are described as inherently beneficial over animal production, Guthman says the details of the production processes for alternative proteins are often proprietary trade secrets, which can prevent independent assessment of their environmental merits.

“We don’t often hear details about the products, crops, energy or other inputs that go into these alternative proteins, where these things are going to come from and under what conditions, or where the waste of this process will go,” she said. “It’s like it’s magic. But something doesn’t really come from nothing. And we have no way of evaluating it.

Ultimately, Guthman says she doesn’t think investing in alternative proteins is necessarily harmful, but she would like to see more transparency in the process and a similar level of societal interest applied to existing methods of producing protein. food with fewer toxic inputs, more humane conditions. for animals, and better soil practices.

“The tech industry is kind of like that new kid on the block who comes in and says, ‘We’re here to save the food system,'” Guthman said. “And there is no doubt that we have to seriously rethink the way we produce food. But I also want people to understand that these are not the only answers. There are existing solutions and alternatives that could really use the kind of resources that the technology sector currently has.

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FIFA has yet to back workers’ appeal fund despite growing support https://villageunderforest.com/fifa-has-yet-to-back-workers-appeal-fund-despite-growing-support/ Tue, 18 Oct 2022 04:00:00 +0000 https://villageunderforest.com/fifa-has-yet-to-back-workers-appeal-fund-despite-growing-support/ (New York) – FIFA has yet to formally commit to a fund to compensate migrant workers for injuries and deaths in Qatar, despite public support from at least seven national football associations, four sponsors of the World Cup, former players, political leaders and, according to an opinion poll, a large majority of the public in […]]]>

(New York) – FIFA has yet to formally commit to a fund to compensate migrant workers for injuries and deaths in Qatar, despite public support from at least seven national football associations, four sponsors of the World Cup, former players, political leaders and, according to an opinion poll, a large majority of the public in 15 countries, Human Rights Watch, Amnesty International and FairSquare said today.

On May 17, five months ago, Human Rights Watch, Amnesty International and FairSquare, along with a global coalition of rights groups, unions and fan support groups, launched the #PayUpFIFA campaign demanding that FIFA awards redress, including financial compensation, for serious abuses, including death, injury, unpaid wages and exorbitant recruitment costs. Just a month away from the tournament, FIFA has yet to announce it will address the abuses but says it is still considering the proposal.

“It’s embarrassing that despite prominent footballers, football associations and sponsors backing the #PayUpFIFA campaign and widespread popular support, FIFA has still failed to commit to appealing for a recourse fund to many thousands of migrant workers who died, were injured or had their wages stolen while making the World Cup possible,” said Michael Page, deputy director for the Middle East and North Africa at Human Rights Watch: “FIFA is failing in its human rights responsibilities and showing its contempt for the migrant workers who have built the infrastructure of the Qatar tournament that will fuel its profits.”

On October 13, The Associated Press reported that FIFA Deputy General Secretary Alasdair Bell told a Council of Europe session that compensation is “certainly something we want to move forward.” However, with just weeks to go until the opening match of the World Cup, neither FIFA nor Qatar have formally committed to establishing a fund to address a range of harms, including the deaths of migrant workers who staged the World Cup.

When football’s governing body FIFA granted Qatar the rights to host the World Cup in 2010, it knew or should have known that the millions of migrant workers building an unprecedented $220 billion infrastructure would face serious human rights risks. Yet FIFA has neither imposed labor rights conditions nor undertaken human rights due diligence. The organization has no longer publicly committed to addressing these serious abuses with weeks to go until the tournament begins.

Since May, Human Rights Watch, Amnesty International and FairSquare have contacted the 32 football associations (FAs) that qualify for the 2022 World Cup, urging them to publicly support the appeals fund. Of these, at least seven of the qualified FAs have so far publicly supported the call for redress, including:

  • Royal Belgian Football Association (RBFA),
  • French Football Federation (FFF),
  • English Football Federation,
  • Deutscher Fußball-Bund (German Football Association, DFB),
  • Koninklijke Nederlandse Voetbalbond (Royal Dutch Football Association, KNVB),
  • Football Association of Wales (FAW) and the
  • United States Soccer Federation (American Football).

In addition, the call was supported by the Norwegian Football Federation, while the Union of European Football Associations (UEFA), the umbrella organization of 55 national football associations, the workers’ rights working group in Qatar lobbied FIFA for a commitment to remedy the program. On October 14, UEFA’s task force said it had asked FIFA to respond and commit to outstanding issues regarding migrant workers by the end of October. The call comes after their June report following a trip to Qatar indicating that the issue of compensation was discussed at length and that the task force “agreed in principle that any injury or death in any workplace in n any country should be compensated”.

Of the 32 qualified teams, Human Rights Watch, Amnesty International, and/or FairSquare conducted in-person or online briefings with FAs, including DFB, KNVB, English FA, Belgian FA, Swiss FA , the French FA, American football, Dansk Boldspil-Union (the Danish Football Union, DBU) as well as the UEFA working group. Three FAs, the Japanese FA, the Football Association of Wales and Football Australia, provided written responses which did not provide any substantive information and failed to respond to a recommendation they are advocating to FIFA to address harm to migrant workers. However, the Football Association of Wales later released a statement saying that together with the UEFA working group they “have agreed on the principle that any injury or death should be compensated”.

At the German FA’s (DFB) human rights conference on September 19, chairman Bernd Neuendorf expressed his “unconditional support” for the appeals fund. The Dutch FA (KNVB) also backed the call for compensation, saying the victims or their relatives should be compensated. Dutch head coach Louis Van Gaal strongly supported the remedy call. The English FA said it was continuing to push for the “principle of compensation” for the families of migrant workers who have lost their lives or been injured on construction projects. The French Football Federation (FFF) said it was working with a dozen other federations to create “a compensation fund for all those who were victims of accidents at work during the construction of the Cup of the world”. In response to questions from the media, the Brazilian Football Confederation (CBF) coach also supported the compensation fund. Among those yet to respond publicly are the 2026 host football associations Mexico and Canada.

A recent global opinion poll commissioned by Amnesty International shows that 67% of 17,477 people polled in 15 countries also share the view that their national federations should speak out publicly on human rights issues related to the World Cup in Qatar, in particular by asking for compensation for migrants. workers. Four sponsors, AB InBev/Budweiser, Coca-Cola, Adidas and McDonald’s have declared their support for the call for solution. Recently, 15 members of the American Congress and more than 120 French parliamentarians also wrote to FIFA in support of the call for redress.

“The message from fans, football associations, political leaders and sponsors is clear: it’s time for FIFA to act and put things right for the migrant workers who made their flagship tournament possible,” said Steve Cockburn, Head of Economic Justice at Amnesty International. . “There is a clear choice for FIFA: dedicate a small proportion of World Cup revenue to making a huge difference for thousands of workers or do nothing and accept that the tournament will be indelibly marked by human rights violations. human rights.”

There is also growing momentum from prominent footballers, coaches and sports commentators supporting the #PayUpFIFA call, including Tim Sparv, former captain of the Finnish football team, and Lise Klaveness, president of the Norwegian FA, who has long insisted on the need to address human rights. abuses linked to this World Cup. At a joint Human Rights Watch, Amnesty International, and Fairsquare press briefing, former Australian men’s national soccer team captain Craig Foster announced that he would donate his salary as a broadcaster during the World Cup to families of deceased workers, among others. Such initiatives should encourage the global football industry, especially the FAs, to go beyond cautiously worded statements. Other top footballers backing the appeal include former star players Gary Lineker and Alan Shearer.

As member associations of FIFA, the FAs are required to follow FIFA’s own human rights policy. Moreover, as bodies which, through their commercial relations with FIFA, benefit financially from the income generated by the World Cup, the federal federations also have a responsibility, under the United Nations Guiding Principles on business and human rights, to use their influence to prevent and mitigate actual and potential risks. adverse human rights impacts, which they cause, contribute to or are linked to, including in Qatar.

Since 2018, Qatari authorities have put in place promising measures to protect workers from wage theft and improve access to justice, while introducing reforms to the kafala (sponsorship) system. However, significant gaps remain. The benefits of these programs have been limited due to their late introduction and narrow scope, as they do not cover all workers, particularly in the case of initiatives led by the Supreme Committee for Delivery and Legacy that offer better protections for a limited number of workers, or address abuses in the years before the systems were put in place. Fundamentally, significant gaps in implementation and enforcement remain. For example, workers who have already left Qatar cannot access labor committees or a fund set up to pay them when their employers do not.

Even the FAs who have spoken out should also go beyond carefully worded words and symbolic acts to use their platform to push for concrete actions that concretely benefit migrant workers and their families.

“Compensation can have far-reaching consequences for families who rely on the fund to repay loans, for children’s education or to buy food. When FAs lend their voice, they help ensure that thousands of families who have lost their sole breadwinner repay outstanding loans or unpaid bills,” said Nick McGeehan of FairSquare.

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