Village community – Village Under Forest http://villageunderforest.com/ Sat, 15 Jan 2022 00:51:15 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://villageunderforest.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-2021-06-25T171231.357-150x150.png Village community – Village Under Forest http://villageunderforest.com/ 32 32 Drug problem worsening in small centers and rural areas of Saskatchewan: RCMP https://villageunderforest.com/drug-problem-worsening-in-small-centers-and-rural-areas-of-saskatchewan-rcmp/ Sat, 15 Jan 2022 00:51:15 +0000 https://villageunderforest.com/drug-problem-worsening-in-small-centers-and-rural-areas-of-saskatchewan-rcmp/ Last year was a record year for overdose deaths in Saskatchewan. The Saskatchewan Coroners Service announced this week that 464 people died of confirmed or suspected drug overdoses in 2021, compared to 327 in 2020 and 179 in 2019. In Regina and Saskatoon alone, there were a total of 172 confirmed drug overdose deaths in […]]]>

Last year was a record year for overdose deaths in Saskatchewan.

The Saskatchewan Coroners Service announced this week that 464 people died of confirmed or suspected drug overdoses in 2021, compared to 327 in 2020 and 179 in 2019.

In Regina and Saskatoon alone, there were a total of 172 confirmed drug overdose deaths in 2021.

However, while many of the deaths in the province are occurring in the province’s two largest municipalities, the growing number of deaths reported in smaller centers and rural areas is cause for concern.

Read more:

Saskatchewan experiences another record year for overdose deaths in 2021

One community worried about the increased amount is Yorkton, Saskatchewan.

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St. Sergeant. Burton Jones took over as Detachment Commander of Yorkton RCMP Detachment in July 2021.

In an interview with Global News, Jones said the detachment has been called in for five confirmed fentanyl overdose deaths since becoming detachment commander.

In the same time frame, he added that there were at least 10 instances where RCMP members used Narcan to revive a person.

Jones said fentanyl has become a major problem in the city and region.

“I think it’s more of a problem or a problem here than we suspect,” he suggested. “It’s become very cheap and very easy to get your hands on, and because of that it’s become a very popular drug in and around this region.”

Read more:

COVID-19 is increasing in Saskatchewan, but first responders are not experiencing staff shortages

That’s not the only contributing factor to the overall problem, according to Jones.

He said many in the community don’t know or realize that synthetic opioids are creating societal problems in their own neighborhoods.

“The problem with fentanyl is that it’s so dangerous as a drug because it’s 100 times more potent than, say, morphine,” Jones explained. “A small amount is enough to kill someone.”

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Click to play the video:







Opioid crisis: Mothers who lose their children to fentanyl overdose speak of a small community in crisis


Opioid crisis: Mothers who lose their children to fentanyl overdose speak out on a small community in crisis – November 12, 2021

Jones mentioned that he recently met with Yorkton City Council to discuss the seriousness of the drug situation in the community.

Even city council members weren’t ready to hear the kind of impact drugs are having on their municipality.

“It was quite a surprise and shock for us to learn of this,” Yorkton Mayor Mitch Hippsley said. “We always suspected it was here, but we had no idea how heavy it was here.”

Read more:

2021 another dark year for drug overdoses in Saskatchewan

Hippsley thinks the community awareness factor is key to knowing how to tackle the problem in a city with a population of around 18,000.

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“It’s something we hear happening in big cities, so you want to pretend it’s not happening here, but it’s migrated here and become a bigger problem,” he said.

“When we find out that we have had five (overdose deaths) in the last six months, per capita, you end up with somewhere between 11 and 12 in a year in a city our size. So are we concerned? Absolutely, we are worried.

Hippsley hopes that improved communication and community efforts can help reduce the number of overdose deaths — and possibly reduce the amount of drugs on the streets — in and around the city.


Click to play the video:







New book traces the roots of the opioid crisis


New book traces roots of opioid crisis – April 26, 2021

“A blow for all of us”

Jones pointed out that fentanyl is also present in rural and remote areas of Saskatchewan.

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Colleen Larocque, a resident of Spy Hill, a village about 100 kilometers southeast of Yorkton near the Saskatchewan-Manitoba border, lost her 29-year-old son, Mitchell Sveinbjornson, to a a drug overdose on August 22, 2020.

The night he died, she told Global News, he went out with a group of friends and eventually went to buy some cocaine. However, the toxicology report showed that fentanyl and carfentanil were present in the drugs he took.

Read more:

An Edmonton man is facing drug trafficking charges after being arrested in Yorkton, Saskatchewan.

Sveinbjornson had two daughters as well as six siblings.

“They build these drugs out of whatever they can get their hands on,” Larocque said of the drug suppliers.

“There have been a number of overdoses in rural – very rural – Saskatchewan over the past year with people you wouldn’t expect.”

Larocque said she understands the drugs were purchased somewhere in the Yorkton area based on what the investigation determined, but there are still questions about where her son obtained them.

Read more:

Saskatchewan RCMP warn of dangers of illegal drugs

She said some things she would like to see more of in rural communities are drug test strips and detox or rehab beds.

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“Accessibility in this province is very poor,” commented Larocque.

“As a community through COVID, we’ve worked so hard on mental health issues that our overdose numbers shouldn’t be climbing where they are. It’s definitely not getting better. »


Click to play video: “Saskatchewan joins Moms Stop The Harm to end the stigma behind drug overdoses”







Saskatchewan joins Moms Stop The Harm to end the stigma behind drug overdoses


Saskatchewan joins Moms Stop The Harm to end the stigma behind drug overdoses – September 1, 2021

Larocque suggested that parents of teenagers or young adults in their family keep a naloxone kit at home and learn how to use it.

“You might not need it for your child, but you might need it for his friend. You never know,” Larocque said.

“My kids all have kits in their homes now, whether they’re users or not. At least they have the ability to save someone if the opportunity arises.

— with files by Nathaniel Dove

© 2022 Global News, a division of Corus Entertainment Inc.

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Valentino Gareri Atelier Designs Prototype for Circular Economy Village https://villageunderforest.com/valentino-gareri-atelier-designs-prototype-for-circular-economy-village/ Thu, 13 Jan 2022 06:08:29 +0000 https://villageunderforest.com/valentino-gareri-atelier-designs-prototype-for-circular-economy-village/ Valentino Gareri Workshop was selected to design The spiral village. This is the pilot project of a circular economy village model which aims redefine urban sprawl through sustainability and diversified programming. The Spiral Village will be made up of eight residential centers, as well as coworking and entertainment spaces. 3D printing methods will be used […]]]>

Valentino Gareri Workshop was selected to design The spiral village. This is the pilot project of a circular economy village model which aims redefine urban sprawl through sustainability and diversified programming. The Spiral Village will be made up of eight residential centers, as well as coworking and entertainment spaces. 3D printing methods will be used to build the Spiral Village, which will allow circularity through a waste recovery center, a diversified regenerative agricultural system, a sustainable water management system and renewable energies.

Image: Valentino Gareri Atelier

Urban planner and political economist Steven Liaros and water engineer Nilmini De Silva, who founded the Australian town planning consultancy PolisPlan, developed the concept of circular economy villages. They describe it as a vision “For a network of high-tech and regenerative villages that aspire to self-sufficiency and zero waste within their bioregion. “ In this planning model, “Each village is home to a diverse community of up to 200 people and will integrate affordable coworking and cohabitation spaces with water and energy micro-grids and a regenerative agricultural system.The Spiral Village, designed by Valentino Gareri Atelier, will be the pilot project of the Circular Economy Villages concept.

“We envision a new way of life where people can experience a closer relationship with nature and the food they eat, thus creating a strong sense of community. At the same time, we seek to integrate technologies in innovative ways to improve our lives and reduce the cost of living. For decades, the common belief was that living in a sustainable village meant giving up comforts. With the concept and design principles of PolisPlan’s ‘Spiral Village’ and Circular Economy Village, we reimagine the future of life where nature, sustainable energy sources and modern technologies are combined. “- Valentino Gareri

Image: Valentino Gareri Atelier

Located five hours north of Sidney, The Spiral Village will be built on a 40 hectare site. The residential structures have a geometric design, strategic to maximize solar energy and rainwater harvesting.

The water system creates a series of basins, the lowest of which will be used for cleaning the wastewater, which will then be recycled. In addition, there will be an agricultural system intended to provide food to residents and help with organic waste management. The project also includes a platform for the conversion of inorganic materials into new products or other resources.

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Providing vaccination against COVID in rural areas: Jabs knocking on the door in Raigad, Maharashtra; here’s how https://villageunderforest.com/providing-vaccination-against-covid-in-rural-areas-jabs-knocking-on-the-door-in-raigad-maharashtra-heres-how/ Tue, 11 Jan 2022 13:51:18 +0000 https://villageunderforest.com/providing-vaccination-against-covid-in-rural-areas-jabs-knocking-on-the-door-in-raigad-maharashtra-heres-how/ Since vaccination centers are far from the village, visiting vaccination centers can be a full day’s task for community members in remote villages. In January 2021, India launched the largest vaccination campaign for over 138 crores of citizens with a lot of misinformation and myths in the population. Initially, while battling the second wave, the […]]]>

Since vaccination centers are far from the village, visiting vaccination centers can be a full day’s task for community members in remote villages.

In January 2021, India launched the largest vaccination campaign for over 138 crores of citizens with a lot of misinformation and myths in the population. Initially, while battling the second wave, the vaccination campaign progressed at a dismal rate, but when the government changed its approach to vaccination for the entire adult population, the vaccination campaign began to fall apart. accelerate. As of December 20, 2021, official figures indicate that more than 1.37 billion doses of vaccination have been administered in the country. While citizen immunization is government led, nonprofit organizations are filling the gaps by working with local and grassroots governments to make the immunization campaign acceptable and accessible for rural India, home to more of the half of the Indian population.

Meet Jayshri Jayram Gaikwad is a 65-year-old resident of Kumbarshet – a village upstream from Sudhagad, Raigad. Leaning on her grandson and her son, she managed to walk to the premises of the public school, where the COVID-19 vaccination camp was taking place. She took her first jab and thanked the medical team and the Swades Foundation team. Suffering from severe joint pain and the remote village having limited means of movement, Jaishri Gaikwad is said to have difficulty reaching the nearest medical center located 4 km from his village. She shares, “I can’t walk without support. Taking a bus from our village and visiting the dispensary near our village is a full day’s task. If the camp had not been organized in our village by government authorities and the Swades Foundation, I cannot imagine getting vaccinated. Or it would have been a big task for me to reach the dispensary.

Like Jayshri, many other rural women and men in the most remote villages of Raigad, Maharashtra was able to get vaccinated against COVID-19 thanks to the vaccination on wheels organized by the district authorities supported by the Swades Foundation. Ronnie and Zarina Screwvala’s philanthropic initiative has been active in the field of geography for over 20 years and driven by their mission to empower rural life, it has impacted over half a million members from the community. Since the start of the pandemic, the Swades Foundation has been working hand in hand with the district administration to control the spread of COVID-19.

Up to December 20, more than 31,000 vaccinations have been supported under the Vaccination on Wheels initiative in the most remote parts of Raigad district in Maharashtra. Raigad District Administration and The Swades Foundation have taken a systematic approach to this successful vaccination campaign.

Understand and fight against vaccine hesitancy

In early 2021, as the nationwide vaccination campaign was launched, the air was filled with a lot of misinformation. This has added to the fear and apprehension in the minds of the rural population in particular, the tribal population. The Swades Foundation and the district administration first surveyed 570 community members over the age of 45 in remote villages in June 2021 to understand their apprehensions and fears. More than 45% of tribal community members said they feared the side effects of the vaccination. The survey showed that 74% of community members were unwilling to vaccinate. The Swades Foundation then responded to these fears by organizing virtual sessions with experts. The more than 1,300 Village Development Committees (VDCs) of the Swades Foundation – a group of empowered community members who volunteer to plan and execute development plans for their village and Swades Mitra – Village Health Volunteers played a decisive role in mobilizing community members for immunization.

With a core belief in community participation, the Swades Foundation has also engaged opinion leaders and key stakeholders to ensure that vaccination camps receive maximum community participation for this. The village of Sarpanch de Dapoli in Raigad understood the challenges faced by members of the rural community of Raigad during the second wave. To avoid a similar situation in his village, he understood that vaccination was the only weapon. So, he joined the ASHA agent to mobilize community members for immunization and led community group discussions and also went door-to-door to motivate community members for immunization.

Mobile vaccination campaigns

Since vaccination centers are far from the village, visiting vaccination centers can be a full day’s task for community members in remote villages. For many villagers who survive on a daily wage, skipping a day’s work means no food for the family that day. Likewise, understanding the concerns of elderly and disabled citizens, going to vaccination centers far from their village is a huge challenge. Understanding this, the Swades Foundation supported the district administration with three mobile vans that would take the government health team to the most remote villages and ensure successful vaccination of community members. This partnership provided the district health service with mobility support to reach hard-to-navigate villages and also enable on-site vaccination camps for the workforce on farms, commercial sites and sites. project.

Careful bottom-up planning resulted in successful vaccination of remote community members. ASHA village workers and Swades Mitra prepared a list of eligible candidates and shared it with the nearest health center. By ensuring optimal use of resources and vaccines, health teams deployed mobile vaccination vans to villages and ensured the success of vaccination camps. Sharmila Prabhakar Utekar, the Swades Mitra for the village of Turbhe Khurd in Poladpur shares, “At the start of the year, vaccines were available at the Primary Health Center. But community members were reluctant to visit as modes of transportation from our village are limited. It is difficult for the elderly to move around. Therefore, the vaccination did not take off. But, when the Vaccination on Wheels initiative was launched, people were able to get vaccinated at their doorstep. They didn’t have to quit their jobs or travel far to get the vaccine. I informed community members and prepared the list of eligible candidates for vaccination. This is how we ensured the complete vaccination of more than 100 community members in our village. “

Another inspiring story is that of the village of Kudgaon in Raigad. The women led the village VDC members, first got themselves vaccinated, and then convinced the hesitant villagers to get vaccinated. Rajashree Dombale sharing his experience said “Initially, the villagers were reluctant to be vaccinated. Everyone was afraid of the side effects this could cause. That’s when we decided to take our first dose first and then convince the villagers to get vaccinated. We told them that we were in good health and that the vaccination had no side effects. This motivated many villagers and they were ready to be vaccinated.

Community participation and ownership

As the district administration also responded to the second wave, the health infrastructure and workers were overwhelmed. The Swades Foundation Village Development Committee took the lead and mobilized community members, contacted health centers for vaccination and provided logistical support. In the village of Barasgaon, the vaccination participation rate was low. Ten empowered women from the village mobilized the villagers by making home visits, understood their hesitations about vaccinations and supported them with the necessary information thanks to the experts and experiences of the vaccinated community members. They also convinced the medical staff to reschedule the camp and these women organized and managed it. About 409 community members were vaccinated in the village.

The Foundation has now expanded to Nashik and also supports the Vaccination on Wheels initiative there. Since the first lockdown, Swades has supported emergency relief and recovery measures. This includes support for 17,000 grocery kits for tribal families in Raigad and more than 3.6 lake meals for migrants, homeless people and wage earners in Mumbai. The Foundation also supported aid with essential medical equipment to government health facilities worth INR 15 crore, including 14 ambulances, 179 jumbo oxygen cylinders, 16 ventilators, 144 oxygen concentrators, etc.

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Athens receives funding for clean energy | Greene County https://villageunderforest.com/athens-receives-funding-for-clean-energy-greene-county/ Sun, 09 Jan 2022 16:19:13 +0000 https://villageunderforest.com/athens-receives-funding-for-clean-energy-greene-county/ ATHENS – The village of Athens is set to receive $ 20,000 in clean energy funding from the state after the municipality took steps to become a climate smart community this year. As part of the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority’s (NYSERDA) Clean Energy Communities Initiative, the village qualified for funding through […]]]>

ATHENS – The village of Athens is set to receive $ 20,000 in clean energy funding from the state after the municipality took steps to become a climate smart community this year.

As part of the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority’s (NYSERDA) Clean Energy Communities Initiative, the village qualified for funding through the state’s points system.

In order to receive funding, the village had to take steps to become a clean energy community, completing a series of climate-friendly tasks, including the village securing the commitment of 10 residents to register for a community solar program.

The village can use the $ 20,000 in funding to upgrade its energy infrastructure as it sees fit.

“The money is limited to things that reduce energy use or switch from using dirty energy to clean energy,” village administrator Dr Joshua Lipsman said Thursday. “So we are in the process of determining which projects we have in the village that correspond to this objective and on which we can spend this money. “

Lipsman, who is chairman of the Conservation Advisory Board and leads the Athens Clean Energy Community effort, said the board will decide which projects to use the money on at the next meeting. of the village board on January 12.

“So far we have a number of things that we are looking at,” he said. “One is to install software in our wastewater treatment plant that will reduce electricity consumption by 25-30%. It looks like it could save us $ 5,000 to $ 6,000 a year. So it’s a win-win situation. The second is that the village has a flagship building called the Cultural Center, which is an older building on Second Street. The building needs many upgrades and renovations, each of which could have the goals that NYSERDA seeks to achieve.

Lipsman said the village first applied for the state program in 2019 and received $ 30,000 in that round of funding. With the initiative on hold in 2020 due to COVID, the village has requested another round of funding this year.

“We are delighted with this recognition from New York for our efforts in Athens to help our residents while helping the environment,” village mayor Amy Serrago said in a statement. “It’s a win-win situation. Our residents win because these programs can save them money. Our village wins cash prizes. The environment wins when we reduce our use of fossil fuels that create climate change. “

Doreen Harris, President and CEO of NYSERDA, praised Athens for its commitment to clean energy.

“The village of Athens continues to have a significant impact in the fight against climate change, and we applaud their strong leadership and continued commitment,” she said in a statement. “These actions reduce carbon emissions, save energy and will create a healthier, more sustainable future while helping New York State meet its climate and clean energy goals.” “

The village must choose which projects it intends to use public funds on by February, and the selected projects must start within six months and then be completed within three years.

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Lyons Falls Mayor Resigns Due to Recent ‘Health Alert’ | Lewis County https://villageunderforest.com/lyons-falls-mayor-resigns-due-to-recent-health-alert-lewis-county/ Sat, 08 Jan 2022 01:38:29 +0000 https://villageunderforest.com/lyons-falls-mayor-resigns-due-to-recent-health-alert-lewis-county/ LYONS FALLS – Village Mayor Beau J. Bailey has announced his resignation from the post he had held for just over a year. “After a health crisis last week, some time to assess my life situation and many other factors beyond my control, I have decided to resign as mayor of the village of Lyons […]]]>

LYONS FALLS – Village Mayor Beau J. Bailey has announced his resignation from the post he had held for just over a year.

“After a health crisis last week, some time to assess my life situation and many other factors beyond my control, I have decided to resign as mayor of the village of Lyons Falls with immediate effect.” , he wrote on the village’s Facebook. New Years Day page. “Thank you all for your help and support over the past year, but I am too out in the open and have learned that I was not built to be a political figure. My goal is to continue to be involved in relaunching our community just from a different perspective. Happy New Year and God bless you! “

Mr Bailey campaigned as a written candidate in the 2020 election after his predecessor, Anne P. Huntress, posted a similar letter to the community in October of that year, stating that she would not seek re-election in part for health reasons and not being able to meet the required time commitment.

During his short period in office, Mr Bailey moved quickly to deliver on some of his election promises, including bringing back the popular July 4th Independence Festival. He also worked with community leaders, local business owners and Lewis County Economic Development to form a task force to revitalize the village. The working group prioritized the completion of the clean-up of the former Lyons Falls pulp and paper mill site on Center Street in the heart of the village and the launch of a campaign to actively seek out the next company (s). to develop waterfront property.

Mr. Bailey and his wife Danielle Bailey own and operate Black Moose Automotive on Laura Street in the village next to their home. They have two children.

Mr. Bailey could not be reached for further comment.

At 6 p.m. on Monday, the village council will hold a special meeting to “discuss vacancies and other issues” at the village office, 4059 Cherry St.

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“Three Minutes: A Stretch” examines Jewish life before the Nazi invasion https://villageunderforest.com/three-minutes-a-stretch-examines-jewish-life-before-the-nazi-invasion/ Thu, 06 Jan 2022 10:36:13 +0000 https://villageunderforest.com/three-minutes-a-stretch-examines-jewish-life-before-the-nazi-invasion/ AMSTERDAM – Glenn kurtz found the film reel in the corner of her parents’ closet in Palm Beach Gardens, Florida in 2009. It was in a dented aluminum box. The Florida heat and humidity had almost solidified the celluloid into a mass “like a hockey puck,” Kurtz said. But someone had transferred some of it […]]]>

AMSTERDAM – Glenn kurtz found the film reel in the corner of her parents’ closet in Palm Beach Gardens, Florida in 2009. It was in a dented aluminum box.

The Florida heat and humidity had almost solidified the celluloid into a mass “like a hockey puck,” Kurtz said. But someone had transferred some of it to a VHS tape in the 1980s, so Kurtz could see what it contained: a family film called “Our Trip to Holland, Belgium, Poland, Switzerland, France and England, 1938 “.

The 16-millimeter film, made by his grandfather, David Kurtz, on the eve of World War II, showed the Alps, quaint Dutch villages and three minutes of footage of a vibrant Jewish community in a Polish town.

Old men in kippahs, skinny boys in caps, girls with long braids. Smile and joke. People flock through the great doors of a synagogue. There is a hustle and bustle in a cafe and then that’s it. The sequence ends abruptly.

Kurtz, however, understood the material’s value as evidence of Jewish life in Poland just before the Holocaust. It would take him nearly a year to find out, but he found that the footage showed Nasielsk, his grandfather’s birthplace, a town about 30 miles northwest of Warsaw that some 3,000 Jews called home. them before the war.

Less than 100 would survive.

Now the Dutch filmmaker Bianca Stigter used the fragmentary and ephemeral sequences to create “Three Minutes: An Elongation”, a 70-minute feature film that helps to better define what has been lost and what has been lost.

“It’s a short streak, but it’s amazing what it brings back,” Stigter said in an interview in Amsterdam recently. “Every time I see him, I see something that I haven’t really seen before. I must have seen it thousands and thousands of times, but I can still see a detail that escaped me before.

Almost as unusual as the footage is the journey it took to gain wider exposure. Almost forgotten within her family, the videotape was transferred to DVD and sent to the US Holocaust Memorial Museum in Washington in 2009.

“We knew it was unique,” ​​said Leslie Swift, head of the museum’s film, oral history and recorded sound branch. “I immediately contacted him and said, ‘If you have the original film, that’s what we want. “”

The Holocaust Museum was able to restore and digitize the film, and it posted the footage to its website. At the time, Kurtz didn’t know where he was shot, nor did he know the names of the people in the town square. His grandfather had emigrated from Poland to the United States as a child and died before he was born.

Thus began a four-year detective work, which led Kurtz to write a acclaimed book, “Three minutes in Poland: discovering a lost world in a family film from 1938”, published by Farrar, Straus and Giroux in 2014.

Stigter relied on the book to complete the film, which is being co-produced by her husband, Steve McQueen, the British artist and Oscar-winning director of “12 Years a Slave,” and narrated by Helena Bonham Carter. It caught the attention of documentary circles and was screened at Giornate degli Autori, an independent film festival organized alongside the Venice Film Festival; the Toronto International Film Festival; Telluride Film Festival; the Amsterdam International Documentary Film Festival; and DOC NYC. It was recently shortlisted for this month’s Sundance Film Festival.

Nasielsk, which had sheltered Jews for centuries, was caught up on September 4, 1939, three days after the German invasion of Poland. Three months later, on December 3, the entire Jewish population was rounded up and expelled. People were forced into cattle cars and traveled for days without food or water, to the towns of Lukow and Miedzyrzec, in the Lublin region of Nazi-occupied Poland. From there, most of them were deported to the Treblinka extermination camp.

“When you see it you want to yell at these people to run away, come on, come on, come on,” Stigter said. “We know what’s going on and they obviously don’t know what’s starting to happen, just a year later. It puts enormous pressure on these images. It is inescapable. “

Stigter stumbled across the footage on Facebook in 2014 and found it instantly fascinating, especially because much of it was shot in color. “My first idea was just to extend the experience of seeing these people,” she said. “For me it was very clear, especially with the kids, that they wanted to be seen. They really look at you; they try to stay in the frame of the camera.

Historian, author and film critic for a Dutch national newspaper, NRC Handelsblad, Stigter worked on this film, its first director, for five years. She started it after the Rotterdam International Film Festival invited her to produce a short video essay for her Critic’s Choice program. Instead of choosing a feature film, she decided to explore these found images. After making a 25-minute “film essay”, presented at the Rotterdam festival in 2015, she received support to develop it into a feature film.

“Three minutes: a lengthening” never leaves the footage. Viewers never see the city of Nasielsk as it is today, nor the faces of those interviewed as talking heads. Stigter tracks, zooms in, stops, rewinds; it focuses on the cobblestones in a square, the types of caps worn by boys, and the buttons on jackets and shirts, which were made in a nearby Jewish-owned factory. She creates still portraits of each of the 150 faces – no matter how vague or out of focus – and names some of them.

Maurice Chandler, a 90-year-old Nasielsk survivor, is one of the smiling teens in the pictures. It was identified after a granddaughter in Detroit recognized him in a digitized clip on the Holocaust Museum’s website.

Chandler, who was born Moszek Tuchendler, lost his entire family in the Holocaust; he said the pictures helped him remember a lost childhood. He joked that he could finally prove to his children and grandchildren “that I am not from Mars”. He was also able to help identify seven other people in the film.

Kurtz, author and journalist, had discovered a tremendous amount through his own research, but Stigter helped solve other mysteries. He couldn’t read the name on a grocery store sign because it was too fuzzy to read. Stigter found a Polish researcher who uncovered the name, a possible clue to the identity of the woman standing in the doorway.

Leslie Swift said that David Kurtz’s footage is one of the “most requested films” in the Holocaust Museum’s motion picture archive, but more often than not it is used by documentary filmmakers as footage. archives or background images, to indicate pre-war Jewish life in Poland “generically,” she said.

In contrast, Kurtz’s book and Stigter’s documentary explore the material itself to answer the question “What am I seeing?” Over and over again, she said. By identifying the people and the details of the life of this community, they succeed in restoring humanity and individuality.

“We had to work as archaeologists to extract as much information as possible from this movie,” Stigter said. “What’s interesting is that at a certain point you say: ‘we can’t go any further; this is where it ends. But then you find out something else.



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Artist Joel Anderson presents the exhibition “One Image at a Time” https://villageunderforest.com/artist-joel-anderson-presents-the-exhibition-one-image-at-a-time/ Fri, 31 Dec 2021 20:49:35 +0000 https://villageunderforest.com/artist-joel-anderson-presents-the-exhibition-one-image-at-a-time/ Christal Gaines-Emory Special for village news The exhibition “One Frame at a Time: Art, Life & Community” created by artist, speaker and author Joel Anderson will be on display at Fallbrook Library through January 3, highlighting many of Anderson’s collaborative works. Anderson has expressed himself through art for many years and has gained experience through […]]]>

Christal Gaines-Emory

Special for village news

The exhibition “One Frame at a Time: Art, Life & Community” created by artist, speaker and author Joel Anderson will be on display at Fallbrook Library through January 3, highlighting many of Anderson’s collaborative works.

Anderson has expressed himself through art for many years and has gained experience through organizations such as the Fallbrook Art Association, D’Vine Path, Autism Tree Project Foundation and mainly Mozart. As an artist with autism, his art reflects his experiences, such as his piece “Colors of my Mind” which represents his synesthesia and the feelings he associates with certain colors, for example he associates the color blue with courage.

The Fallbrook Library was looking to showcase an artist with special needs when it came across Anderson, a Fallbrook resident.

“We really appreciate the staff at Fallbrook Library for hosting this exhibit,” said Sandi Anderson, mother of Joel Anderson and director of Anderson’s corporate programs, “Joel’s Vision Arts”. “All of his pieces have a story, which is why the library is the perfect place for his art.”

Anderson used this exhibit as an opportunity for artistic learning, as well as a way to spread joy to others.

“This exhibition has helped me grow as an artist and as a human,” he said. “It helped me develop my own skills, one step and one story at a time.”

Along with the show, Anderson is also promoting his “Smile Bags”, a kit he makes for children in need to make them smile. These kits are filled with art supplies, toys, and other gifts that will bring joy to a child.

Anderson has set up a donation box near the exhibit so the community can donate to help children in need around the world. So far, the Smile Bags have been delivered to children in 10 countries, including India, Peru and the Philippines. Not only that, but 10% of all his paintings sales are spent creating the Smile Bags.

Artist Joel Anderson presents the “One Picture at a Time” exhibit in the Fallbrook Library to bring joy to the community. Fallbrook Village News / Courtesy photo

Anderson has been called the “smile artist” for his dedication to bringing joy to others, through his artwork as well as his volunteer experiences. The “One Frame at a Time: Art, Life & Community” exhibition serves the same purpose, by showing these meaningful and unique works, Anderson hopes to bring joy to the community.

“My art is very colorful and meaningful; people like it, ”he said. Anderson hopes his art will inspire children to express themselves through art, and he hopes people will find joy in the wide variety of his work.

Anderson paints animals, people, objects, places and all of his art has deep meaning. Her final piece will be on display in Japan, and this piece features paintings of the eyes of her family, friends, mentors and idols. Anderson said he was very happy to be able to show the community his work through the exhibit at the Fallbrook Library.

Anderson also said he looks forward to continuing to grow as an artist and as a person through his work.

For more information on artist Joel Anderson, visit https://www.joelsvisionarts.com/.


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🌱 Patchogue Daily: The Village’s New Year’s celebration is canceled https://villageunderforest.com/%f0%9f%8c%b1-patchogue-daily-the-villages-new-years-celebration-is-canceled/ Wed, 29 Dec 2021 23:32:08 +0000 https://villageunderforest.com/%f0%9f%8c%b1-patchogue-daily-the-villages-new-years-celebration-is-canceled/ Get up, Patchogue! Here’s everything you need to know to get a good start on Thursday. First of all, the weather forecast for the day: Mostly cloudy, a little rain. Top: 49, bottom: 44. Here are the top 4 stories from today in Patchogue: Midnight on Main St. in Patchogue is canceled due to COVID-19 […]]]>

Get up, Patchogue! Here’s everything you need to know to get a good start on Thursday.


First of all, the weather forecast for the day:

Mostly cloudy, a little rain. Top: 49, bottom: 44.


Here are the top 4 stories from today in Patchogue:

  1. Midnight on Main St. in Patchogue is canceled due to COVID-19 issues. The big celebration was scheduled for Friday, New Years Eve, in Patchogue, but event organizers announced the cancellation on Tuesday. (Grand Long Island)
  2. Patchogue Theater for the Performing Arts has announced a new edition of Jokes on Main, his new comedy series starring Tri-State’s funniest comedians, Michael Somerville, Motts Pelazza, Joey Callahan and Bill Chiang. The event will take place on Friday, January 14 at 8 p.m. The content of the show is not recommended for children. Tickets cost $ 30 plus fees. Save $ 5 per ticket when you order 10 or more tickets. Purchasing tickets in advance is highly recommended. (Broadway world)
  3. The second annual Patchogue Plunge is back after being canceled in 2020. The event is hosted by the Patchogue Young Professionals and will take place over Super Bowl weekend on February 13. This year’s dive will benefit the Gabby Petito Foundation. (Patch Patch)
  4. As COVID-19 cases on the rise in Long Island, several sites offer walk-in testing. It is important to get tested if you have symptoms of COVID-19 after being exposed, even if you are fully vaccinated or have recently recovered from COVID-19 in the past 3 months. Click on the link to check locations and times. (LI News12)

today Patchogue Daily is offered to you partly by Newrez, one of the nation’s leading mortgage lenders. Make a smart move for your future and refinance with Newrez today. Call 844-979-1707 to get in touch with a Newrez loan officer. Newrez, LLC (NMLS # 3013)

  • Large Patchogue: “This LED-lit New Years Eve ball will remain in storage.” (Facebook)
  • Patchogue-Medford Library: “Have you ever seen the new Spider-Man movie? Gavin recommends reading the books first.” (Instagram)
  • Patchogue Chamber of Commerce: “Please stay safe and healthy! Regarding Midnight on Main Street in Patchogue: After much thought and discussion with the village of Patchogue and local public safety agencies, we are deeply sorry for the cancellation of the event.” (Instagram)
  • Next door neighbor, Lower East Patchogue: “Hello Family, please help me congratulate my awesome daughter and Airmen Patricia Gant who is the Senior NCO of the Year.” (The next door)
  • Next door neighbor, North Patchogue: “Does anyone know people to do a deep clean?” “(The next door)

More from our sponsors – thank you for supporting the local news!

Events:


Do you like patchogue on a daily basis? Here are all the ways you can get more involved:


You are all caught up for today! I’ll see you soon.

Debora Whitehead

About Me: Debora Whitehead is a dedicated wife and home teacher mother from Coram, NY. She has a bachelor’s degree in education and enjoys teaching and writing. Her passion for the community is reflected in her volunteer work with “Ministry Mariposa”, a non-profit family support program. One of her strongest beliefs is Jesus Christ, and when she isn’t parenting, teaching, or reading, she is writing. One of her favorite quotes is: “The future belongs to those who believe in the beauty of their dreams.” – Eleanor Roosevelt.



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Mayor of Tinley Park says village will not use resources to apply Vax https://villageunderforest.com/mayor-of-tinley-park-says-village-will-not-use-resources-to-apply-vax/ Tue, 28 Dec 2021 10:00:21 +0000 https://villageunderforest.com/mayor-of-tinley-park-says-village-will-not-use-resources-to-apply-vax/ TINLEY PARK, IL – Tinley Park Mayor Mike Glotz has announced that the village will not implement Cook County’s last vaccination mandate once it goes into effect on January 3. In a brief letter to residents, Glotz acknowledged that the onus of upholding the new mandate lay with county officials such as the Cook County […]]]>

TINLEY PARK, IL – Tinley Park Mayor Mike Glotz has announced that the village will not implement Cook County’s last vaccination mandate once it goes into effect on January 3.

In a brief letter to residents, Glotz acknowledged that the onus of upholding the new mandate lay with county officials such as the Cook County Public Health Department and the Cook County Sheriff’s Office.

Glotz’s comments come days after Orland Park Mayor Keith Pekau released a statement calling for the warrant, which will require indoor sites to check customers’ vaccination cards before granting them entry, an abuse of illegal power.

“My job is to promote the local economy and make sure that everyone is safe in our village,” Glotz said.

At the start of the COVID-19 pandemic and Glotz’s tenure as mayor, Glotz repealed former Mayor Vandenberg’s mask tenure, saying the village should not create public health mandates. Glotz can also legally choose not to enforce the county order because the Tinley Park Police Department is not responsible for enforcing a county-wide initiative.

The order is mandatory for all suburban towns in Cook County except Skokie, Evanston, Oak Park, and Stickney Township, which all have their own municipal health departments.

For now, Glotz has said the village will continue to follow guidelines from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, including masking and social distancing when advised.

“We have all struggled in the past 21 months with this pandemic, but we can overcome this together by using common sense and respecting others,” Glotz said in a press release. “I have no doubts that our resilient community will advance in 2022 stronger and better than before.”


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Governor Hochul announces 13 new state testing sites – York College / CUNY https://villageunderforest.com/governor-hochul-announces-13-new-state-testing-sites-york-college-cuny/ Sun, 26 Dec 2021 17:04:02 +0000 https://villageunderforest.com/governor-hochul-announces-13-new-state-testing-sites-york-college-cuny/ Sites open Wednesday, December 29 – Appointments can be made From monday Builds on governor’s announcement that MTA metro stations will offer Covid-19 testing from next week Governor Kathy Hochul today announced 13 new state testing sites to deal with the recent increase in COVID-19 cases. These sites aim to provide additional testing options in […]]]>

Sites open Wednesday, December 29 – Appointments can be made From monday

Builds on governor’s announcement that MTA metro stations will offer Covid-19 testing from next week

Governor Kathy Hochul today announced 13 new state testing sites to deal with the recent increase in COVID-19 cases. These sites aim to provide additional testing options in high need areas in the New York, Long Island, Central New York, North Country, Finger Lakes, Mohawk Valley, and Southern Tier areas.

“To get through this winter wave and protect New Yorkers, we will use all the tools at our disposal,” Governor Hochul said. “By mobilizing testing sites statewide, we will ensure testing is more accessible and convenient for New Yorkers. We will continue to expand test availability to all corners of the state, assessing where more capacity and additional sites are needed soon.

Sites are currently mobilized and all locations are expected to open on December 29, 2021. Days and hours of operation will vary depending on the location of the site and each will offer testing by appointment, as well as walk-in tours. you. At launch, all sites will offer RT-PCR testing. Rapid antigen and rapid PCR tests will also be available a few days after opening.

Starting Monday, December 27, New Yorkers can make an appointment for a COVID-19 test at one of these locations.

BioReference Laboratories Executive Chairman Jon R. Cohen, MD said, “It is a privilege to work with Governor Hochul as she continues to effectively lead New York during this phase of the COVID-19 pandemic. We are working diligently to open these sites as soon as possible. as possible to help provide the most convenient and accessible COVID-19 testing to New Yorkers during this rapid and unprecedented increase in demand for testing. “

A list of new test sites by region is available below:

New York Center

Moravian Fire Department
38 Keeler Street
Moravia, NY 13118
Opening hours: Monday, Wednesday and Friday: 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday: 9 a.m. – 3 p.m.

Finger lakes

SUNY Genesee Community College
Albion University Center
456 West Avenue
Albion, New York 14411
Opening hours: Monday to Saturday: 10 a.m. to 7 p.m.

Long island

IBEW Local 25
370 Highway
Hauppauge, NY 11788
Opening hours: Monday to Saturday: 8 a.m. to 6 p.m.

Kennedy Memorial Park
335 Greenwich Street
Hempstead, New York 11550
Opening hours: Monday to Friday, 9 am to 7 pm; Saturday 9 am-5pm

Mohawk Valley

American Legion Post
86 Main Street West
Milford, New York 13807
Opening hours: Monday, Wednesday and Friday: 8 am to 5 pm; Saturday: 8 a.m. – 12 p.m.

New York City

Adam Clayton Powell State Office Building
163, 125th Street West
New York, New York 10027
Opening hours: Monday to Saturday: 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.

Central Family Life Center
59 Wright Street
Staten Island, New York 10304
Opening hours: Monday to Saturday: 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Concourse Village Community Center
777 Concourse Village East
Bronx, New York 10451
Opening hours: Monday to Saturday: 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Kings Plaza Shopping Center
5100 Place des Rois
Brooklyn, New York 11234
Opening hours: Monday to Saturday: 9 a.m. to 6 p.m.

York College Performing Arts Center
94-45, boulevard Guy R Brewer
Jamaica, NY 11451
Opening hours: Monday to Saturday: 9 a.m. to 7 p.m.

Northern country

Citizens Lawyers
324 Creighton Road
Malone, New York 12953
Hours of operation: Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday: 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.

Maple Ridge Center
7421 East Road
Lowville, New York 13367
Opening hours: Monday and Wednesday: 9:00 am – 2:00 pm; Friday: 9 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.

South level

Watkins Glen State Park Gift Shop / The Glen Cafe
1009 Franklin Street North
Watkins Glen, New York State 14891
Opening hours: Monday to Saturday: 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.

Additional sites statewide are also planned, and information regarding those sites will be announced shortly. New Yorkers can find sites near them using the NYS website.


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