Village community – Village Under Forest http://villageunderforest.com/ Tue, 28 Jun 2022 10:02:00 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://villageunderforest.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-2021-06-25T171231.357-150x150.png Village community – Village Under Forest http://villageunderforest.com/ 32 32 Westlake-Bay Village Rotary Arts Festival Registration Open : West Shore Chatter https://villageunderforest.com/westlake-bay-village-rotary-arts-festival-registration-open-west-shore-chatter/ Tue, 28 Jun 2022 10:02:00 +0000 https://villageunderforest.com/westlake-bay-village-rotary-arts-festival-registration-open-west-shore-chatter/ WESTLAKE, Ohio – It’s almost the 4th of July, but there’s still time for artists to participate in the second edition Westlake-Bay Village Rotary Arts Festival. The event takes place on July 30. Visit westlakebayvillagerotaryartfest.com for more information on booth space and registration. The family festival will begin at 10 a.m. on the green space […]]]>

WESTLAKE, Ohio – It’s almost the 4th of July, but there’s still time for artists to participate in the second edition Westlake-Bay Village Rotary Arts Festival. The event takes place on July 30. Visit westlakebayvillagerotaryartfest.com for more information on booth space and registration.

The family festival will begin at 10 a.m. on the green space in front Westlake Porter Public Library, 27333 Center Ridge Road, Westlake. It will take place rain or shine and will feature over 50 artists, live music, food trucks, a beer and wine garden, balloons for the kids and ample free parking.

Cleveland artist Shaun Kinley, who is known internationally for his Cleveland skylines, cityscapes, bridges, and sports acrylic canvas prints, will be the featured artist and will have some of his works for sale.

In addition to the festival, Westlake Kiwanis will have a pancake breakfast beginning at 8 a.m. at Westlake Elementary School next to the library. Visitors can support Kiwanis by enjoying breakfast and then walking to the festival.

For more information about the art festival and corporate sponsorships, email josephkraft@gmail.com.

The Elks raise funds for CFK: Lakewood Elks Lodge 1350 again donated the use of its facilities at 24350 Center Ridge Road, Westlake to Login for kids for a bowling fundraiser that generated over $5,000 for the Westlake-based nonprofit. Sixty bowlers took part in the event on April 23. Funds raised will allow CFK to continue its mission to educate and support local families. “Last year’s bowling event was such a success that we jumped at the chance to do it again,” said Lakewood Elks Lodge 1350 elated manager Mike Sheehan. for everyone involved as our Elks members can combine their love of bowling with the opportunity to raise funds and help a local organization that does so much for families in our community.According to Sarah Rintamaki, Executive Director of CFK, the lodge is the ideal place to hold this event because of the facilities it offers for children with disabilities.

“Many of our families would be hesitant to take their child bowling to a large facility because the crowds and noise can be overwhelming for some. With its small size, wheelchair-accessible lanes and assist bowling ramps, the Elks facility provides a safe space for families to have fun on their own in a judgment-free zone,” she said. . The bowling fundraiser is just one of a series of events that CFK and the Elks have collaborated on this year. Others included a poker tournament and the creation of 250 resource bags for the spring resource fairs.

Donated children’s books fill a collection bin at Don Umerley Hall in Rocky River. Photo courtesy of the Rotary Club of Lakewood-Rocky River Sunrise

Children’s books: The Rotary Club of Lakewood-Rocky River Sunrise The Books for Kids project will celebrate its third anniversary in August. Residents of Rocky River and surrounding communities continue to support the initiative with donations.

Books for Kids is a national program that was established in 1986, based on the belief that all children have the right to books and deserve dedicated spaces where they can read. The project is designed to expand access to books where children learn, live and play, and to enable adults to read alongside them to develop lifelong literacy skills during the prime years. criticism of their development. The mission of the Cleveland Kids’ Book Bank is to foster literacy and a love of reading by distributing free books to children in need through collaboration with community organizations.

The Children’s Book Bank opened in February 2016 to receive, manage and distribute shipments of books each month. About 30% of their books come from the community, while the rest come from online second-hand booksellers.

There is a Rocky River Kids’ Book Bank outdoor collection bin located near the door to Umerley Hall in the Rocky River Civic Center complex behind Rocky River City Hall. This is one of many dumpsters in the Cleveland area. Bins provide a place for community members to drop off new and lightly used children’s books they no longer use, and then the Book Bank distributes the books through more than 1,000 partner organizations working with children and parents to encourage them to read.

Patty Boesken, President of Project Sunrise Rotary, recently announced a cooperative program with the Rocky River Public Library that will make regular donations of out-of-circulation children’s books to the Book Bank. She said that since the book bin was installed two years ago, more than 1,000 books have been donated. The Sunrise Club is one of two Rotary clubs in Lakewood and Rocky River. One club meets at noon on Mondays and the other at 7:30 a.m. on Wednesdays in Umerley Hall at Rocky River Civic Center, Hilliard Boulevard and Wagar Road, behind Rocky River City Hall.

For more information about Rotary, contact Kathy Berkshire at sloopyohio19@gmail.com.

For more information about the Cleveland Children’s Book Bank, visit kidsbookbank.org or find them on social media.

Community Champions: Westlake residents Bill and Joyce Litzler were honored by Cuyahoga Community College as Community Champions in a virtual ceremony on June 21. They are part of two local organizations and four individuals who have served as examples of community service over the past year.

The Litzlers have shared a passion for enriching the lives of Tri-C students since their first donation to the college in 2006. Their contribution provides critical support through their scholarship fund, which benefits graduates of the Seeds of Literacy program and other GED graduates. who continue their studies at Tri-C.

Visit tri-c.edu/awards2022 to see the full program, which also includes a conversation with outgoing Tri-C President Alex Johnson.

At the library: Here are some programs planned for Westlake Porter Public Library this week.

The Escape Challenge for grades 7-12 will take place from 3-4 p.m. on June 30. It will test their ability to work together and solve clues to unravel a mystery. Registration is requested.

Oceans of Fun, a magic show with Jim Kleefeld, will be offered at 7 p.m. on June 30. The show is aimed at children up to grade five and their families. To register for one of the programs, visit westlakelibrary.org/events

Information, please: Readers are invited to share information about themselves, their families and friends, organizations, religious events, etc. of Bay Village, Rocky River and Westlake for the West Shore Chatter column, which I write as a freelancer. Awards, honors, milestone anniversaries or birthdays and other items are welcome. Submit information at least 10 days before the requested publication date to carolkovach@hotmail.com.

Learn more about the West Bank Sun.

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Oakland County Community Calendar for June 26 and Beyond – The Oakland Press https://villageunderforest.com/oakland-county-community-calendar-for-june-26-and-beyond-the-oakland-press/ Sun, 26 Jun 2022 09:34:59 +0000 https://villageunderforest.com/oakland-county-community-calendar-for-june-26-and-beyond-the-oakland-press/ Career/education activities • A virtual information session will be held on July 9 for a pre-apprenticeship program at Oakland Community College. The session will discuss OCC’s no-cost pre-apprenticeship program and how it can provide students with a manufacturing career path with OCC employment or apprenticeship with a local partner company. Classes for the next 5-week […]]]>

Career/education activities

• A virtual information session will be held on July 9 for a pre-apprenticeship program at Oakland Community College. The session will discuss OCC’s no-cost pre-apprenticeship program and how it can provide students with a manufacturing career path with OCC employment or apprenticeship with a local partner company. Classes for the next 5-week program begin September 12. Register for the information session at eventbrite.com/e/pre-apprenticeship-program-information-session-tickets-133249473763.

• STEM in Nature Camp, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., July 11-15, Farmington Hills Nature Center at Heritage Park, 24915 Farmington Road, Farmington Hills. There will be an optional evening campfire and evening hike on Thursday, July 14 after camp. Participants ages 12-14 will experience nature up close as they explore and study the forests and rivers of Heritage Park. Call the Nature Center at 248-477-1135 or email Nature Center Supervisor Ashlie Smith at asmith@fhgov.com

• The Oakland County Head Start Enrollment Lounge will be held from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. July 13 at 196 Cesar E. Chavez Pontiac, OLHSA.org. No need for tickets come rain or shine, ice cream and free games.

• Buckfire & Buckfire, PC with an office in Southfield, offers four annual scholarships to support students who demonstrate a commitment to academic excellence at accredited schools in the United States. Scholarship applications are due October 1, buckfirelaw.com/scholarships.

Charitable activities

• The Gleaners Community Food Bank Food Distribution Event will be held at the Oakland County Farmers Market, 9-11 a.m., June 29, while supplies last, for those in need. Drive-up and stay in the vehicle, or distribution without an appointment, no need for proof of eligibility. For more information, call 248-858-5495 or email OCmarket@oakgov.com.

• Arising Images, a local Lake Orion portrait studio, is offering the opportunity to submit applications for a charitable grant. Organizations must be a 501(c)3 within 75 miles of the Lake Orion community and provide child-focused programs and/or services. Several grants between $15,000 and $30,000 will be awarded. Applications should be submitted by July 31, 248-720-5848.

Farmers Markets/Garden Activities

• Museum at Farmers Market: 10am-11am July 2, downtown walking tour at Downtown Rochester Farmers Market, 202 E. 3rd St. Rochester,rochesterhills.org/museum, free.

• The 15th Annual Southfield Garden Club Walk of Southfield Parks and Gardens will take place June 26 from 2-5pm at 15 gardens in the Beacon Square area, 11 Mile and Winchester. Tickets are $10 and can be purchased the day of the event. The walk starts at the old Leonhard Elementary School in Winchester and Devonshire. A shuttle will make a continuous loop through the neighborhood. Free Leonhard School parking and refreshments are included, southfieldparksandgarden.org.

festivals

• Berkley Pride Block Party is from noon to 4 p.m. June 26, Robina, North at 12 Mile, Downtown Berkley, Entertainment, Music, Games, Food Trucks, Booths, Free Event, downtownberkley.com/berkleypride.

• Annual Michigan Rib Fest: July 1-4, Canterbury Village, 2325 Joslyn Ct., Orion Twp., live entertainment for all ages, ribs and other dishes, monster truck rides, registration for sessions at michiganribfest.com , $7 per person, free for active duty military veterans with ID and children under 3), parking $5.

Golf outings

• Drive for Life Invitational presented by Beaumont Urgent Care by WellStreet East July 11, registration 8:30 a.m., jamming 10 a.m., July 11, Oakland Hills Country Club, 3951 W Maple Rd, Bloomfield Hills, benefiting Walter & Marilyn Wolpin Comprehensive Breast Care Center in Beaumont, Royal Oak and the Wilson Cancer Resource Center in Beaumont, Troy, register at (947) 522-0092 or visit beaumont.org/driveforlife.

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A series of 19th-century murders links an Argentine writer to his family’s past https://villageunderforest.com/a-series-of-19th-century-murders-links-an-argentine-writer-to-his-familys-past/ Fri, 24 Jun 2022 00:58:06 +0000 https://villageunderforest.com/a-series-of-19th-century-murders-links-an-argentine-writer-to-his-familys-past/ JTA — On June 9, 2009, Javier Sinay’s father sent him an email with the subject line, “Your great-grandfather.” The email was linked to a Spanish translation of an article written in 1947 by Mijel Hacohen Sinay. “The First Mortal Victims in Moises Ville” detailed a series of murders that occurred in this village, Argentina’s […]]]>

JTA — On June 9, 2009, Javier Sinay’s father sent him an email with the subject line, “Your great-grandfather.” The email was linked to a Spanish translation of an article written in 1947 by Mijel Hacohen Sinay.

“The First Mortal Victims in Moises Ville” detailed a series of murders that occurred in this village, Argentina’s first rural Jewish community, between 1889 and 1906. All of the victims were recent Jewish immigrants, murdered by traveling gauchos who took advantage of their vulnerability. .

“Reading this article raised many questions,” Sinay, an investigative journalist from Buenos Aires, explained in an interview with the Jewish Telegraphic Agency in New York during his recent book tour. “Why did my great-grandfather report murders committed half a century earlier? Who were the people murdered? And why?”

One question led to another, and as a result Sinay began his own investigation, an investigation that grew into something much bigger and deeper.

The result is “The Moises Ville Murders”, a book that goes beyond true crime to become a history of Jewish migration to Argentina, as well as a travelogue of Sinay’s visits to Moises Ville, retracing his own family roots. A surprise success in Argentina, the book had three printings and launched a national debate on collective memory in a society that often prefers to bury the past. It was published earlier this year in English by Restless Books.

The village of Moises Ville, where the murders took place, is located about 400 miles north of the Argentine capital Buenos Aires. For Argentine Jews, it is a mythical place, to which they attach feelings of nostalgia like those that American Jews feel for the Lower East Side of Manhattan. However, as Sinay points out, “its history is unique since Argentina has the only Jewish community that began as an agricultural community.”

Fleeing poverty and pogroms, hundreds of thousands of Jews left Tsarist Russia at the end of the 19th century. Munich philanthropist Baron Moritz von Hirsch founded the Jewish Colonization Association, which facilitated their resettlement in Latin America on the theory that Jews who lived in small shtetls would find it easier to become farmers in the New World than to resettle in urban areas. However, as the book’s publisher puts it, “Like their city’s prophetic namesake, these immigrants fled one form of persecution to encounter a different set of hardships: exploitative land prices, starvation, disease [and] Language barrier.”

The first inhabitants of Moises Ville were a group of families from Bessarabia and the region of Podolia in today’s Ukraine. The village will soon become the cultural center of Jewish life in Argentina. Among the founders were Sinay’s great-grandfather, Mijel Hacohen Sinay, who arrived in 1894, and Alberto Gerchunoff, who in 1910 would publish “Los Gauchos Judios” (“The Jewish Cowboys”), a collection of short stories set in a village inspired by Moises Ville. Gerchunoff’s book is considered the first Latin American literary piece focusing on Jewish immigration to the New World.

However, by the time the book was published, the majority of Jews had already settled in Buenos Aires, including Mijel Hacohen Sinay and Gerchunoff, whose father was one of those murdered in Moises Ville.

Javier Sinay, 42, was born and raised in Buenos Aires. When he first learned of the murders, he didn’t know much about Moises Ville or his family’s history.

Javier Sinay’s book on Moises Ville and his family’s history was a surprise hit in Argentina, where it went through three print runs. (Julian Voloj/JTA)

“I always knew I was Jewish, but I wasn’t raised in a Jewish environment,” said Sinay, who started working on the book when he was 28. “It was like an old call to learn more about my ancestors. I found myself a link in a chain.

This channel was not only linked to his Jewishness, but also to his love for journalism. “Before I started my research, I didn’t know that I came from a family of journalists, going back to my great-grandfather, the protagonist of my book.”

In 1898, Mijel Hacohen Sinay founded Argentina’s first Jewish newspaper, the Yiddish language Der Viderkol (The Echo).

“He was barely 20 years old. Finding that out was just amazing,” Sinay said.

Sinay himself worked for the newspapers La Nación and Clarín and as editor of the Argentinian edition of Rolling Stone. He is currently an editor for REDACCION.com.ara news media about solutions journalism.

To read his great-grandfather’s work, however, Sinay had to overcome a language barrier. To learn Yiddish, he went to the Fundacion IWO, the South American counterpart of YIVO, the New York-based YIVO Institute for Jewish Research. “I couldn’t even read the Hebrew letters,” he says.

He was quickly able to read newspaper headlines and book titles in Yiddish, but despite his progress, “it’s not enough to translate entire articles by myself.” Sinay was introduced to Breitman’s Ana Powazek, known to her friends as “Jana”, the daughter of two Holocaust survivors from Poland, who would help with translations.

“I would go to the warehouse of Tzedek [a Buenos Aires Jewish charity] and look for old Yiddish books. If it looked like there might be something interesting for my research, I would buy the book and give it to Jana to translate. She would read for me in Yiddish, then translate into Spanish while I typed notes. For four years, they will meet twice a week.

Original copies of his great-grandfather’s diary had been stored in the building of the Jewish Federation of Argentina, AMIA, which was destroyed in a 1994 terrorist attack.

“The AMIA bombing is very traumatic for the entire Argentinian Jewish community, but almost made my research impossible. It underlines that it was also the destruction of a culture,” Sinay said.

Some newspapers survived and were part of an exhibit at the National Library of items rescued from the terrorist attack. However, after the exhibition, even these papers disappeared. Sinay has hired a private detective to find them, but so far nothing has been unearthed. “But I haven’t given up hope,” he said.

The culmination of his investigation was his trip to Moises Ville. “I think I was the first of the Sinays to come back after my family ended up in Buenos Aires,” he said.

Today, Moises Ville has just over 2,000 inhabitants, approximately 10% of whom are Jewish. Jewish sites include the Kadima Cultural Center, which contains a theater and library; the old Hebrew school, the first Jewish cemetery in Argentina and three synagogues. A particularly meaningful experience for Sinay was spending Shabbat in Moises Ville at one of the local synagogues.

“I had never been to the synagogue before. I celebrated my first Kabbalat Shabbat in Moises Ville. It was a fascinating experience. I was thinking about my ancestors and what kind of Jew I am. My upbringing has little in common with these immigrants, but I feel very connected to them,” he said.

“The Moises Ville Murders” brings to light a chapter in Argentina’s history that has been largely forgotten.

The Workers’ Synagogue (Arbeter Shul) in Moises Ville, Argentina, photographed in 2010. (Wikimedia Commons/ via JTA)

“There is a romanticized image of immigration, but the reality was brutal,” Sinay explained. Although he couldn’t find all the answers he was looking for, he thinks he understands why his great-grandfather wrote about the murders more than half a century after they took place.

“He wrote about the murders just after the Second World War, in a time of collective mourning. It was a catharsis remembering the dead, and while it wasn’t related to the Holocaust, it was part of the zeitgeist. He was talking about our history and our suffering. I don’t know if that’s true, but that’s a theory I have,” he said.

Connecting as a journalist with the work of his great-grandfather is also a tribute to the power of journalism, he said. “There’s a lot of chaos in journalism today, but it’s still possible to find good, meaningful stories that become our legacy.”

Reflecting on his own identity, he concluded, “I didn’t do a bar mitzvah, but maybe writing this book and claiming my Jewish identity through journalism was my bar mitzvah. And it’s something that I chose, not something that was imposed on me.

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Tim Blakeslee is the new Plymouth Town Administrator, responsible for public services https://villageunderforest.com/tim-blakeslee-is-the-new-plymouth-town-administrator-responsible-for-public-services/ Tue, 21 Jun 2022 21:56:26 +0000 https://villageunderforest.com/tim-blakeslee-is-the-new-plymouth-town-administrator-responsible-for-public-services/ PLYMOUTH – Tim Blakeslee will be Plymouth’s new city administrator and director of public services from August 1. The Plymouth City Council approved the hiring of Blakeslee on Tuesday. The city administrator, appointed by the city council, helps manage day-to-day city operations such as budgeting and assisting department heads. Blakeslee, who lives in Port Washington, […]]]>

PLYMOUTH – Tim Blakeslee will be Plymouth’s new city administrator and director of public services from August 1.

The Plymouth City Council approved the hiring of Blakeslee on Tuesday.

The city administrator, appointed by the city council, helps manage day-to-day city operations such as budgeting and assisting department heads.

Blakeslee, who lives in Port Washington, always wanted to be a city manager, he said.

“After visiting Plymouth and seeing its small-town charm with big-city amenities and businesses, I fell in love with the community and thought it would be a great idea to apply for the job,” he said. -he declares. “I’m delighted to have been nominated, and I’m excited to work with the staff and get to know the residents and businesses.”

Blakeslee holds a master’s degree in public administration from The Ohio State University and serves as deputy village superintendent for the Whitefish Bay Villageposition he has held for approximately five years.

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New Yorkers commemorate the village of Seneca during the June 19 celebration https://villageunderforest.com/new-yorkers-commemorate-the-village-of-seneca-during-the-june-19-celebration/ Sun, 19 Jun 2022 22:04:06 +0000 https://villageunderforest.com/new-yorkers-commemorate-the-village-of-seneca-during-the-june-19-celebration/ Prior to the Civil War, a predominantly black community flourished in the village of Seneca, on the land that is now Central Park. On Sunday, as part of a commemoration of Juneteenth, a federal holiday that recognizes the end of slavery in the United States, black storytellers, dancers and musicians performed in the park to […]]]>

Prior to the Civil War, a predominantly black community flourished in the village of Seneca, on the land that is now Central Park.

On Sunday, as part of a commemoration of Juneteenth, a federal holiday that recognizes the end of slavery in the United States, black storytellers, dancers and musicians performed in the park to tell the story of life in this village. It is one of the earliest examples of what life after slavery was like for some black people in New York State.

“It’s really important for everyone to know that this land wasn’t always Central Park. It actually belonged to our own people at one time,” said Andrew Thomas Williams V, 30, a descendant of Andrew Williams, a shoe shiner who at 25 became one of the first blacks to purchase land in what would become Seneca Village.

Census records and maps show about 1,600 people lived on the land that would become Central Park, said Marie Warsh, a historian at the Central Park Conservancy. About 225 of those people lived in the village of Seneca, a thriving African-American community.

“It’s certainly the most densely populated and organized settlement in the territory that became Central Park,” Ms Warsh said.

New York City officials used eminent domain to seize the land in 1857 to build Central Park and offered compensation to the people who lived there. A number of people protested, arguing that what they were being offered was not enough. Among them was Mr Williams, who asked for $4,000 but was offered $2,335, from a video produced by the Conservatory.

New York City Mayor Eric Adams, who attended Sunday’s celebration, noted how that upheaval resonates today, likening the relocation of Seneca Village to gentrification that is now forcing black residents out of neighborhoods in New York.

“When this village was torn apart to build this park, we moved the energy from the village of Seneca,” Mayor Adams said from where the community’s first church, the African Union Church, would have been located.

“He never came back,” he said of Seneca Village. “Starting over and over again, and we wonder why we see some of the crises that we face in black and brown communities.”

He said the black families who lived in Seneca Village provided a foundation. “Black communities in the area have been forced to relocate and rebuild in other neighborhoods, like Harlem, Downtown Brooklyn and Bedford Stuyvesant,” Adams said, adding, “Now what? ? We move them again.

The settlement of Seneca Village dates back to the end of slavery in New York State. In 1817, the New York Legislature passed a law abolishing slavery and setting July 4, 1827 as the effective date of the law, nearly 36 years before President Abraham Lincoln signed into law the proclamation of emancipation.

Black people who lived in Lower Manhattan began moving north in the 1820s. Ms Warsh said they wanted to escape Lower Manhattan’s “racist climate”.

“Even though emancipation began around 1827, African Americans living in the inner city still faced many challenges,” she said. “There was a desire to get away from that and create a self-contained community where there was just more opportunity.”

German and Irish immigrants also lived on the land that would become Central Park, but Seneca Village had not only houses but gardens, churches and a school, Ms Warsh said. Many people owned land and had the right to vote.

Isheeka Edwards, 37, watched the commemoration on Sunday with her two children, Lesedi, 8, and Kopano, 3, as Gha’il Rhodes Benjamin, a spoken word poet, led the crowd in singing “This Little Light of Mine ” West. side of the park near 85th Street, the former location of the colorful No. 3 School in Seneca Village.

Ms Edwards, who said she lived in a 1.6 per cent black community in the west, said she had specifically traveled to the city to celebrate June 19. “Anything specifically African American or just seeing black people on a regular basis is pretty limited there,” she said.

She wanted her children “to be aware of this side of America, this history, their own culture,” she said.

Natasha Mast, 42, who attended the event with her husband and two sons, aged 7 and 11, said she was grappling with what should happen next. “Should it be returned somehow? she asked. “It’s definitely something I think about, and I’m not sure what the right move is at this point in the story.”

In the meantime, she planned to continue educating herself and her children about Seneca Village and Juneteenth.

“I’m from Canada but didn’t know about Juneteenth until recently, and I don’t want my kids to grow up unaware of this important date and what it means, so I’m here to my own upbringing but also for them as well,” Ms. Mast said.

Priscilla Bruderer, a nurse who lives on the Upper West Side, also wanted to make sure her child knew about Seneca Village and Juneteenth.

“I feel happy because African Americans have actually found a place to live,” said her son, Mathias Bruderer, 10, who listened to music and made bracelets while learning about the history of Seneca Village. .

Laika Calhoun, 17, a rising senior at Nanuet Senior High School in Nanuet, NY, attended with her brother and parents. She said she experienced a range of emotions, including gratitude and sadness.

“Not only am I in this place, but I witness other black excellences,” Ms. Calhoun said. “The dancers are real, the people are real – it’s not just about remembering what happened, it’s about seeing a new, updated version of it.”

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donation from the Andrie family brings light to the village of Dresser | New https://villageunderforest.com/donation-from-the-andrie-family-brings-light-to-the-village-of-dresser-new/ Thu, 16 Jun 2022 21:45:00 +0000 https://villageunderforest.com/donation-from-the-andrie-family-brings-light-to-the-village-of-dresser-new/ This spring, the Village of Dresser received a generous donation from the Andrie family. The family donated and installed a lamppost in Memory Park. “After our father’s death, we thought about how to recognize their dedication and contributions to the community,” said Karen Andrie, daughter of Roy and Elizabeth (Beth) Andrie. Both Roy and Beth […]]]>

This spring, the Village of Dresser received a generous donation from the Andrie family. The family donated and installed a lamppost in Memory Park.

“After our father’s death, we thought about how to recognize their dedication and contributions to the community,” said Karen Andrie, daughter of Roy and Elizabeth (Beth) Andrie.

Both Roy and Beth grew up in Minnesota. They moved to Dresser in 1956 when Champion Aircraft transferred Roy from Minneapolis, MN to Osceola, WI.

“In 1963, Roy became a Prudential insurance agent. He practiced for 24 years until his retirement in 1987,” Andrie said.

“They both loved the outdoors and befriended many couples in the Dresser area. They all went camping, canoeing, snowmobiling together, including the children. Our father also enjoyed tinkering in his workshop, working with wood and reading about history and science. Our mother enjoyed playing cards with her friends and making quilts.

Roy served on the village council, the Dresser Fire Department and was active in the Boy Scouts. Together, Roy and Beth had six children: Karen, Deane, Ron, Greg, Betsy and Michelle. All children graduated from St. Croix Falls. Deane became the owner of Andrie Electric in Dresser. After graduating from Dunwoody, Greg became a partner. Eventually, Deane retired. The electric company is now owned by Greg and two others. Deane, Greg and Karen Andrie also served on the village council. The six children (Karen, Deanne, Ron, Greg, Betsy and Michelle) still live in and around the village.

After their retirement, Roy and Beth stayed in the area for a while. Roy took a few part-time jobs with Dresser Trap Rock and delivered chicks for Utgaar’s Hatchery in Star Prairie. Beth was a stay-at-home mom but worked for UFE in Dresser. She loved catering events like weddings and graduations for a local organization. She also did the cleaning next door.

“She was never inactive,” Andrie said.

Later in life they were snowbirds and had a model park in Phoenix, Arizona

Beth died in July 2008 at the age of 75. Roy died on November 12, 2021, at the age of 90.

“Our parents were very honest, hardworking and good people. They were always helpful and generous and they had a great time,” Andrie said, “Because the sons worked at Andrie Electric, all of Andrie’s children thought it would be good to light up Memory Park in their honor.

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Ampersand Park renamed Ken Garwood POW Park | News, Sports, Jobs https://villageunderforest.com/ampersand-park-renamed-ken-garwood-pow-park-news-sports-jobs/ Wed, 15 Jun 2022 04:07:06 +0000 https://villageunderforest.com/ampersand-park-renamed-ken-garwood-pow-park-news-sports-jobs/ LAKE SARANAC — The park formerly known as Ampersand Park has been renamed the “Ken Garwood POW Park” after the village council voted unanimously to change the name on Monday. The man who requested the name change, village resident Justin Garwood, is Ken’s grandson. Justin said last year when he asked the village […]]]>

LAKE SARANAC — The park formerly known as Ampersand Park has been renamed the “Ken Garwood POW Park” after the village council voted unanimously to change the name on Monday.

The man who requested the name change, village resident Justin Garwood, is Ken’s grandson. Justin said last year when he asked the village to help him fix the basketball courts in the park where he grew up “pass the rock” with students, he learned that a family story was true.

Ken Garwood was a village administrator in the 1950s, 1960s and 1970s, and in 1968 convinced the village to buy the land at the corner of Broadway and Ampersand Avenue and turn it into a public park. The legal documents for the sale at the time refer to the land as Boyer-Garwood Park but the park was never officially marked with Garwood’s name.

Justin said he wanted the park’s name to also reflect his grandfather’s military service.

“If he were alive today he probably wouldn’t want me to do this, which is why it’s important to me that it’s…Ken Garwood POW Park,” Justin said.

The village mayor, Jimmy Williams, had previously said he thought with the park directly across from the veterans club, it would be appropriate to honor POWs there.

Justin said his grandfather served his country fighting in the Army Air Corps during World War II.

He was shot down twice – once on his first mission in a B-17 bomber, where his plane crashed into the English Channel and he was rescued from the waters, and another time when he became a prisoner of war in Germany for nearly 18 months.

At a public hearing on the name change on Monday, village development board chairman Allie Pelletieri said he thought the name was appropriate, but asked the village to take its time naming the names. things in the future.

“All I’m asking is that when you name things after people, we really consider who they are and what they’ve done,” Pelletieri said. “In this village, we are really lucky to have a whole host of past and present members of the community who do so much for the community.”

After the board’s unanimous vote, there was applause and Williams hugged Justin and Lisa Lionidas, Ken’s daughter. Lionidas was glad the village had renamed the park in honor of her father.

“He is a truly deserving man” she says.

“Happy to finally pay tribute to the man whose idea it was and who gave so much to this country and to the city”, Justin wrote in a message to the company. “Thank you to the mayor, the board and the public for their support.”

To learn more about the park and the life of Ken Garwood, go to https://bit.ly/3QhawBv.



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Calendar of events for June 19, 2022 https://villageunderforest.com/calendar-of-events-for-june-19-2022/ Mon, 13 Jun 2022 13:33:32 +0000 https://villageunderforest.com/calendar-of-events-for-june-19-2022/ The Emancipation Proclamation was issued by then-President Lincoln on January 1, 1863. But it would be more than two years later for all slaves to be assured of their freedom. Juneteenth, short for June Nineteenth, marks the day Federal troops entered Galveston, Texas and informed the remaining slaves that they were now free. To commemorate […]]]>

The Emancipation Proclamation was issued by then-President Lincoln on January 1, 1863. But it would be more than two years later for all slaves to be assured of their freedom. Juneteenth, short for June Nineteenth, marks the day Federal troops entered Galveston, Texas and informed the remaining slaves that they were now free.

To commemorate this day, families and communities, especially in Texas, honored Juneteenth with parades, rallies and festivals. In 2019 Governor Tom Wolf made Juneteenth a statutory holiday and on June 17, 2021 Juneteenth officially became a federal statutory holiday.

This year, there are many ways to honor Juneteenth through community gatherings, history talks, parades and more throughout the city.

Here’s how to celebrate Juneteenth in Philadelphia.

(Art/community) Check out Juneteenth 3000, a new exhibit by Cherry Street Pier Artist-in-Residence Thomcat23 that explores what life would be like for Black Americans 1,135 years after the Emancipation Proclamation. The exhibition will be on view until June 30. (June 3-30, 101 S. Columbus Blvd., cherrystreetpier.com)

(Community/Kid Friendly/Free/Outdoor) Look up as the city shines in honor of Juneteenth. Iconic sites such as Boathouse Row, Ben Franklin Bridge, Citizens Bank Park and more will light up in red and green to celebrate the day. Circle around all the stops throughout the week to admire the glowing skyline. (Free, June 13-19, various locations, facebook.com)

(Community/Free) Second District Brewing serves up history with a craft beer. Come discover the history of Juneteenth through interactive activities, games and more. The event kicks off with a talk on history by Black History Maven. Beer and light snacks will be available for purchase. (Free, June 16, 6-7:30 p.m. 1939 S. Bancroft St., eventbrite.com)

(Music/Kid Friendly) Longwood Gardens’ incredible illuminated fountain performance is a sight (and sound) you won’t want to miss. In honor of Juneteenth, this performance features songs on the themes of freedom, hope and strength with music from artists like Aretha Franklin, Curtis Mayfield and Nina Simone. ($2-$25, June 17-18, 1001 Longwood Road, Kennett Square, longwoodgardens.org)

(Movies/Community) Pack your favorite movie snacks and watch a movie under the stars. In honor of Juneteenth, the feature will be Glory, an American war drama about an African-American Civil War regime. This film is rated R and is intended for a more mature audience. ($10-$20, June 17, 8-10 p.m., 2400 Strawberry Mansion Dr., thelaurelhillcemetery.org)

(Art / community / free) Come meet and learn from historian and artist Michelle Browder. Browder’s work focuses on exposing the rich and often haunting elements of history in an engaging way. During the program, Browder will share how she explores historical narratives. You can choose to join this free event in person or via online streaming. (Free, June 17, 6 p.m., 1314 Locust Street, support.librarycompany.org)

(Community/Kid Friendly) This one-day block party is a free June 19th celebration for everyone in the community. Free food, popsicles and activities for kids will be available while supplies last. (Free, June 18, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., 19th & W.Tioga St., cityathleticsphilly.com)

(Community/Outdoors) This Pride-Juneteenth celebration was designed with Black LGBTQ families in mind. Head to Germantown Ave. for an afternoon of free food, music, vendors, history talks and more. (Free, June 18, 11am-2pm, 6945 Germantown Avenue, philadelphiafamilypride.org)

(Community/Kid Friendly) Johnson House, a National Historic Landmark and Underground Railroad stop, hosts its 16th annual Juneteenth Festival on June 18. Bring the whole family for a full day of music, games, panel discussions, historical re-enactments, and more. (Free, June 18, 12 p.m.-6 p.m., 6306 Germantown Ave., johnsonhouse.org)

(Art/Community) Artist Zsudayka Nzinga guides you through her “Afro Bohemian” art installation, which brings together symbols and icons from black history and culture. Then, check out a special comic book workout dedicated to celebrating real-life black superheroes. Before leaving, Philly’s Positive Movement Drumline is hosting a special performance. This event is free with admission to the National Liberty Museum. ($6-$12, June 18, 1 p.m.-5 p.m., 321 Chestnut St., libertymuseum.org)

(Music/Community/Kid Friendly) Join the Woodmere Art Museum for a day of jazz and poetry with performances from the Arpeggio Jazz Ensemble, Universal Drum and Dance Ensemble, poets and more. (Free, June 18, 2-5 p.m., 9201 Germantown Ave., woodmereartmuseum.org)

(Community/Music/Art/Kid Friendly) Celebrate Juneteenth in West Philadelphia with live entertainment, food, a children’s village and more. Local organizations and groups will march along the parade route which begins at 52nd and Parkside. Then, at the Malcolm X Park festival, you’ll have the chance to play games, shop at local vendors, see art exhibits and more. (Free, June 19, 10 a.m., N. 52nd St. & Parkside Ave., juneteenthphilly.org)

(Community/music/art/kid-friendly) This block party is packed with live performances from artists like Talib Kweli, in addition to food, games, and more. You will also have the opportunity to purchase items from local manufacturers at the Village Marketplace. Register online in advance to also receive free admission to the museum. (Free, June 19, 11am-4pm, 701 Arch St., tockify.com)

» READ MORE: Live your best life in Philadelphia: Read our most helpful stories here

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Our neighborhood as it was – QNS.com https://villageunderforest.com/our-neighborhood-as-it-was-qns-com/ Sat, 11 Jun 2022 14:00:31 +0000 https://villageunderforest.com/our-neighborhood-as-it-was-qns-com/ For many residents of Our Neighborhood in Queens, there just aren’t enough ways to get around without a car. The Greater Ridgewood area is primarily served by two subway lines: the M train, which runs through the heart of Ridgewood and terminates in Middle Village, and the L train, which straddles the Brooklyn/Queens border with […]]]>

For many residents of Our Neighborhood in Queens, there just aren’t enough ways to get around without a car.

The Greater Ridgewood area is primarily served by two subway lines: the M train, which runs through the heart of Ridgewood and terminates in Middle Village, and the L train, which straddles the Brooklyn/Queens border with a few Ridgewood stops along in the manner.

Residents of Glendale and Middle Village have a long walk (or bus ride) to get to the Middle Village-Metropolitan Avenue stop on the M line – the closest subway stop to most community residents. Maspeth residents have the worst: they don’t have access to a subway line without a bus ride to Ridgewood, Middle Village, Elmhurst or Woodside.

Over the past few years, elected officials in our community have advocated for the creation of additional transit options to serve the area. Former councilor Elizabeth Crowley proposed a light rail line along the Lower Montauk branch of the Long Island Rail Road, which is currently used to transport waste and industrial freight. Current Councilman Robert Holden, meanwhile, supports the creation of the Triboro RX, a brainchild of the Regional Plan Association that would use commuter and freight lines to create a new rail line serving Brooklyn, Queens and the Bronx.

Photo by Michael Shain

But long before these ideas saw the light of day, the city had proposed creating a new subway line that would run through the heart of Ridgewood, Glendale and Middle Village – but was firmly rejected by residents at the time.

It was called the “Montauk Options” and would have extended a new subway line along the aforementioned Lower Montauk branch of the LIRR. We are grateful to transit expert Joe Raskin for providing us with some details about the proposal:

The Montauk options were part of the Queens Underground Options Study, which was intended to somehow restart work on some of the lines planned under the 1968 “New Routes” plan. Work was underway for the 63rd Street and Archer Avenue lines, as well as the Second Avenue subway when the city’s budget crisis of the 1970s and 80s halted work.

The original plan called for the 63rd Street line to extend into Forest Hills, connecting to the Queens Boulevard line near Yellowstone Boulevard. It would have done this by using the right-of-way along the LIRR’s mainline, with land acquisition required at Woodside (the right-of-way was essentially the roadbed once used by the Rockaway Beach line between Woodside and Rego Park).

Trains would also run to Rosedale via the upper level of the Archer Avenue line and the LIRR right-of-way. The part of the tunnel that was built (from the Jamaica Center-Parsons/Archer station to a point somewhere between Liberty Avenue and South Road) is now used to drop off E trains.

The study was basically a “Where do we go from here?” thing. There were, in fact, five options:

  • Let’s go back to the original plan of a connection at Forest Hills, with no physical connection between the 63rd Street and Queens Boulevard lines in Long Island City, except for a transfer station at Queens Plaza. The planning commission carried out a comprehensive study of how the Queens Plaza area could be built around the new station.
  • Connecting the two lines to Long Island City. Essentially, it would evolve into what was built; the plan originally called for connection only with local routes.
  • The Montauk-LIRR option, terminating the 63rd Street line at a new Queens Plaza station, putting passengers on LIRR trains there, which would have run the Montauk line to Jamaica and points beyond. of the.
  • The Montauk-Subway option, which would have connected 63rd Street to the Montauk line, incorporating it into the subway system (Queens Plaza station would also have been built, it would have connected to the J line at Lefferts Boulevard, going to Lower level of Archer Ave. In order to build this, the J line as it then existed would have been truncated west of Richmond Hill (I blanked out where the last stop would have been).
  • Do not do anything.

A whole series of meetings were held about it, culminating in an MTA public hearing in 1984. The original plan met with much opposition in Woodside and Forest Hills, due to the scale of the land acquisition and the construction impact that would have been required.

I don’t remember where the tunnel portal in Forest Hills would have been built, but how the actual connection would have been built in Forest Hills is unimaginable.

The two Montauk options encountered huge opposition along this line at Ridgewood, Glendale, Maspeth and Richmond Hill. Al D’Amato spoke at the public hearing against them. Many things were cited including greatly increased line usage, vibration and the need to eliminate level crossings.

There was very little support in the communities of southeast Queens, who would have benefited the most from the Montauk options, other than (to his great credit) Archie Spigner, who spoke out in favor of them at the hearing. public.

As a result, the MTA had no choice but to go with what eventually evolved into the line that was built.

This line, as Raskin mentioned, is the 63rd Street Line which connects Midtown Manhattan and western Queens via the F line, which entered service in 1989. It also includes a stop at Roosevelt Island, the only connection train to residential island in the heart of the East River.

One can only imagine the impact an extended subway line through Ridgewood, Glendale, Maspeth and Middle Village would have on the community today.

To our knowledge, other concerns have been raised, such as the potential electrification of the Lower Montauk line to allow subway cars to run along it. It was a valid concern, given the level nature of the line and the propensity for trespassers to cross the tracks, as seen in this photo from the 1980s.

Teenage trespassers along the LIRR tracks in Glendale (Ridgewood Times archive)

Until March 1998, the LIRR ran diesel-powered commuter trains along the Lower Montauk line during morning and afternoon rush hours. These trains stopped at Richmond Hill (near Lefferts Boulevard and Jamaica Avenue), Glendale (near 73rd Street and Edsall Avenue), Fresh Pond (near Metropolitan Avenue and Fresh Pond Road at the Ridgewood/Middle Village border), Haberman (Rust and 50th Street in Industrial Maspeth) and Penny Bridge (Review Avenue and Laurel Hill Boulevard in Long Island City).

At the time service was canceled along the line, only a handful of passengers were using the trains at peak times. Many of these stops were barely built as stations; Glendale station, for example, lacked platforms, with passengers waiting for trains on the ground on either side of the tracks. Upon arrival, drivers would lower a small stepladder to allow passengers to board and depart.

This 1911 photo shows the LIRR Lower Montauk branch near Glendale Station. (Ridgewood Times Archive/Courtesy Greater Ridgewood Historical Society)

Part of the reason for the lack of usage may be the lack of a direct connection through the Montauk branch in Manhattan; it terminates in Long Island City and passengers bound for Manhattan should walk to the Vernon Boulevard-Jackson Avenue or Hunters Point Avenue stops on the 7 line.

Meanwhile, in southeast Queens, the region’s main rail service is two passenger lines on the LIRR with stops in neighborhoods such as St. Albans, Laurelton and Rosedale. Service is infrequent and expensive; in recent years, the city and the MTA have agreed to a discounted ticket program called “Atlantic Ticket” to make LIRR travel more affordable for area residents.

If the subway line proposed nearly 40 years ago had become a reality, rides on that line would be at the standard New York City Transit fare of $2.75.

Elder’s note: Mr. Raskin chronicles it in his acclaimed book, “The Untraveled Routes: A Journey Through New York City’s Unbuilt Subway System.” It is available for purchase at Amazon and at local booksellers – and you can also borrow it from Borough of Queens Public Library.

* * *

Share your story with us by emailing editor@ridgewoodtimes.com (subject: Our Neighborhood: The Way It Was) or write to The Old Timer, ℅ Ridgewood Times, 38-15 Bell Blvd., Bayside, NY 11361. All photos sent by post will be carefully returned to you on request.

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Take the time to vote on Thompson Community Center – Knox County VillageSoup https://villageunderforest.com/take-the-time-to-vote-on-thompson-community-center-knox-county-villagesoup/ Thu, 09 Jun 2022 12:15:00 +0000 https://villageunderforest.com/take-the-time-to-vote-on-thompson-community-center-knox-county-villagesoup/ Please take the time to vote on June 14 regarding the future of the Thompson Community Center in Union. On June 14, Union voters will have the opportunity to vote on one of five options regarding the future of the Thompson Community Center. A vote for Option #2 will give townspeople their much sought-after community […]]]>

Please take the time to vote on June 14 regarding the future of the Thompson Community Center in Union.

On June 14, Union voters will have the opportunity to vote on one of five options regarding the future of the Thompson Community Center.

A vote for Option #2 will give townspeople their much sought-after community center, restore buildings to their original appearance, and give Union much-needed senior housing, all at a cost of zero to 10. $000 per year; a very small impact on taxes.

There is no guarantee that Union residents will have priority, but Union residents will be the first to know of openings. This is only housing for seniors, not housing for low-income families.

In my opinion, it’s a win-win situation. The Union needs housing for the elderly. There are plenty of state and federal funds available for senior housing.

Buildings need to be restored, and Union gets a community building, all at little or no cost to the city.

Abraham Knight

union

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