Village community – Village Under Forest http://villageunderforest.com/ Mon, 21 Nov 2022 05:02:22 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://villageunderforest.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-2021-06-25T171231.357-150x150.png Village community – Village Under Forest http://villageunderforest.com/ 32 32 New Ranger Station Opens in Jemez Springs https://villageunderforest.com/new-ranger-station-opens-in-jemez-springs/ Mon, 21 Nov 2022 05:02:22 +0000 https://villageunderforest.com/new-ranger-station-opens-in-jemez-springs/ The Santa Fe National Forest has opened a new ranger station in Jemez Springs, off NM Highway 4. (Courtesy Santa Fe National Forest Service) The Santa Fe National Forest opened a new ranger station in Jemez Springs earlier this month. The Jemez Ranger Station opened Nov. 4 at 051 Woodsy Lane, which is surrounded by […]]]>

The Santa Fe National Forest has opened a new ranger station in Jemez Springs, off NM Highway 4. (Courtesy Santa Fe National Forest Service)

The Santa Fe National Forest opened a new ranger station in Jemez Springs earlier this month.

The Jemez Ranger Station opened Nov. 4 at 051 Woodsy Lane, which is surrounded by red rock canyons off NM Highway 4 in Jemez Springs.

The Forest Service said it would hold an open house at a later date. In the meantime, the office is selling firewood and Christmas tree permits over the phone at 575-829-3535.

“I would like to thank everyone for their commitment and flexibility during this multi-year project. It hasn’t been without its challenges, one of which has been mitigated with the help of the Valles Caldera National Preserve sharing offices with district employees,” said Jemez District Ranger Brian Riley. “And I also want to thank the local community and partners for their great support.”

Roger Sweet, the mayor of the Village of Jemez Springs, said the town hopes to become part of the International Dark Sky Community, which is a designation for places that have ordinances and policies in place to preserve the night sky. He said the new ranger station meets the necessary requirements.




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Irvine Park Christmas Village adds a Victorian touch -… https://villageunderforest.com/irvine-park-christmas-village-adds-a-victorian-touch/ Fri, 18 Nov 2022 06:00:00 +0000 https://villageunderforest.com/irvine-park-christmas-village-adds-a-victorian-touch/ IRVINE PARK IS IN ITS VICTORIAN ERA. Who knew Irvine Park would go Victorian for the holiday season? ! The Irvine Park Christmas Village is a total Valley tradition, but it’s getting a makeover this year. The wonderful folks at Irvine Park in Chippewa Falls strive to create a spectacular experience with their Christmas Village […]]]>

IRVINE PARK IS IN ITS VICTORIAN ERA. Who knew Irvine Park would go Victorian for the holiday season? ! The Irvine Park Christmas Village is a total Valley tradition, but it’s getting a makeover this year.

The wonderful folks at Irvine Park in Chippewa Falls strive to create a spectacular experience with their Christmas Village every year, and this year they’re adding a historic touch. Since 1987, Irvine Park (125 Bridgewater Ave., Chippewa Falls) has staged a spectacular light show for park guests to view and experience. Amid the 100,000 historic lights and prop houses that make up part of the exhibition, this year will mark the first time that volunteer actors will be featured, dressed in costume to replicate Victorian life during the Christmas season. The special event will take place on Friday, December 16.

Irvine Park intern Alexis Linder worked to organize the event and create a publicly engaging and historically accurate experience. While looking for volunteers for the event, Alexis was thrilled to have received over 20 responses of interest in the first week of planning.

Irvine Park is a staple of the Chippewa Valley community, so seeing the interest and support from volunteers ages 4 to 75 has been great for the program. Volunteers working at the event will receive information about their role in history to educate and aesthetically enhance the Victorian village.

This new aspect of the Christmas Village is something John Jimenez, the city’s Director of Parks, Recreation and Forestry, has been considering employing for some time and happily passed the project on to Alexis, a current graduate student. at UW-Water. Clear. “I learned that over the past few years groups from the community had volunteered as singers during the event, which I thought was great,” Jimenez said. “Afterwards, I asked myself: ‘How can we improve?’ and one of the first things that came to mind was an immersive experience for the community.

The Irvine Park Christmas Village is an event where guests can peruse the park’s historic sites and props while admiring the organized Christmas lights.

If you want to meet the actors and learn more about the history of the village, you can also walk around the light show and happily chat with the volunteers. Expect to see the members of this village come to life as actors wear costumes rented from a theater in Wausau.

In 1910, William Irvine donated much of his property to the Parks Department on the condition that the park remain free for community use, a condition that has remained important to the park even to this day. With that in mind, the Victorian Christmas Village is free to anyone who wants to experience it.

This historic immersion is a one-day event, so be sure to clear your schedule on Friday, December 16, as the event runs from 5-6:30 p.m. While the Costume Villages will only be there that night, the entire Christmas Village light show begins on Thanksgiving night and ends on January 1. During this time, the park will be open Monday through Sunday, 7:00 a.m. to 9:30 p.m.

Find out more about the Christmas Village on the City of Chippewa Falls website.

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Event Reminder: Matt Hutching Urbanist Talk Monday Plus Comp Plan Community Meetings Kickoff https://villageunderforest.com/event-reminder-matt-hutching-urbanist-talk-monday-plus-comp-plan-community-meetings-kickoff/ Sun, 13 Nov 2022 18:07:54 +0000 https://villageunderforest.com/event-reminder-matt-hutching-urbanist-talk-monday-plus-comp-plan-community-meetings-kickoff/ Matt Hutchins is co-founder of CAST Architecture. (Courtesy of Matt Hutchins) On Monday, two major events unfold. At 6:30 p.m., The Urbanist welcomes activist architect Matt Hutchins to the November edition of our monthly lecture series. Sign up at the bottom for the Zoom link or watch the video recording to drop by Tuesday. Also […]]]>
Matt Hutchins is co-founder of CAST Architecture. (Courtesy of Matt Hutchins)

On Monday, two major events unfold. At 6:30 p.m., The Urbanist welcomes activist architect Matt Hutchins to the November edition of our monthly lecture series. Sign up at the bottom for the Zoom link or watch the video recording to drop by Tuesday.

Also happening Monday is the first of a series of community meetings that the Seattle Office of Planning and Community Development (OPCD) is hosting for the comprehensive plan update it is working on for 2024 (see our intro for the last). OPCD’s Monday Community Meeting will be held at the New Holly Gathering Hall from 6-8 p.m. The Hutchins lecture will be recorded, so planners can participate in both events as an afterthought.

Here is the full schedule of the five community meetings the OPCD has scheduled in Seattle this winter. The agency is also accept an online comment.

  • Monday, November 14 – 6 p.m. to 8 p.m.:
    New Holly Gathering Hall
    7054 32nd Ave S, Seattle, WA 98118
    Tram: 1 line
    Metro Bus: 36
  • Thursday, December 1 – 6 p.m. to 8 p.m.:
    Langston Hughes Institute for the Performing Arts
    104 17th Ave S, Seattle, WA 98144
    Metro Bus: 8 and 27
  • Thursday, December 8 – 6 p.m. to 8 p.m.:
    South Seattle College, Brockey Center
    6000 16th Ave SW, Seattle, WA 98106
    Metro Bus: 125 and 128
  • Monday, December 12 – 6 p.m. to 8 p.m.:
    Loyal Heights Community Center
    2101 NW 77th St, Seattle, WA 98117
    Metro Bus: Line D and 40
  • Tuesday, January 10 – 6 p.m. to 8 p.m.:
    Meadowbrook Community Center
    10517 35th Ave NE, Seattle, WA 98125
    Metro Bus: 65

How to Comment at Compensation Plan Meetings

If you attend community meetings, bring a friend (if you can) for moral support and commiseration. We encourage people to highlight the importance of thinking big about housing in order to tackle the housing crisis that is displacing working class people and contributing greatly to homelessness. While the community add-on of Variant 6 didn’t make the cut in the OPCD’s scoping report, the agency scaled up Combined Alternative 5 to make it a promising option that would be a significant improvement over the status quo.

We encourage you to share your own housing story, but here are a few points to raise about the Comp Plan. The Hutchins conference is likely to provide some additional information, so we’ll update as needed.

  • Apartments should not be confined to busy thoroughfares. OPCD said its Corridors Alternative 4 now includes more apartment zoning off arterials and on quiet streets. Thank them and ask for more.
  • Allow sixplexes on most residential lots to make neighborhood residential (or single-family) areas less exclusive and expensive. The OPCD said it was looking at sixplexes “on larger lots,” but declined to define where the boundary would be. Encourage them to think broadly in the broad 3 alternative and only exclude the smaller lots. The study should focus on sixplexes on the majority of neighborhood residential lots, not just exceptionally large lots.
  • Sixplexes are more likely to be built than quadruplexes because land is expensive in Seattle and authorization process too often is an expensive nightmare, which discourage homebuilders from building anything other than a larger single-family home. If we really want to offer more housing, the sixplex zoning is obvious.
  • Neighborhood anchors are intriguing, but making them bigger might serve as a better anchor. Focused Alternative 2 adds approximately 40 neighborhood anchors across Seattle, drawn as circles 2,000 feet in diameter or less. This provides just 70 acres of denser mixed-use zoning to act as a community node with amenities and services. It may not be enough to do Neighborhood 15 minutes away transformation as envisioned, and it will not guarantee great housing growth without being paired with other approaches as Combined Alternative 5 does.
  • The expansion of leaner urban villages is a great idea. The study will look at expanding the boundaries of some of the most anemic urban villages today (Admiral, Greenwood–Phinney Ridge, Morgan Junction and Upper Queen Anne). We encourage the OPCD to consider even more extensions. Why is the eastern half of Wallingford Urban Village so skinny, for example. Why isn’t North Fremont an urban village? Why does the Northgate urban center end just 2 blocks east of the light rail station?

Urban planner interview with Matt Hutchins

In his hour-long keynote and Q&A, Hutchins will help us understand the multiple land use and housing issues we face and how they can help us become a more affordable, equitable and responsive city. climate.

There’s a lot going on in Seattle right now that will shape its look and feel, where it will grow and who will live here for decades into the future: Seattle’s Global Plan Update process is In progress and will determine if we grow by doubling Existing Urban Villages or look at our city’s sprawling single-family neighborhoods and end exclusionary zoning. Due to popular pressure and city council action, Seattle is currently – and chaotiis lying — study ways of reforming or limiting heavy Design the review process and make our system of housing creation fairer.

Mayor Bruce Harrell floated revive micro-housing as a more affordable housing option and a way to build more housing in a city that desperately needs it. And all of this is happening in the context of ongoing affordable housing and homelessness crisis and the region that just comes out of one of the longest smoke seasons we’ve ever known, a taste of what awaits us if we don’t do all we can to fight climate change.

As one of the founders of CAST Architecture, Hutchins has spent more than 20 years working to increase the vitality of the city and the environment through the thoughtful design of housing, dynamic urban spaces, a inclusive community design and advocacy for more open and abundant space. lodging. As certified Passive house as an architect, he has strived to design deeply green buildings that are resistant to smoke pollution and extreme weather events. He also advocated for sixplexes and a “Seattle 6” designing an aesthetic to ensure that they are beautiful and beautiful places to live.

The Seattle Six can add to any neighborhood. (Image by Matt Hutchins/CAST)

Hutchins serves on the Seattle Planning Commission, the Seattle Chapter of the American Institute of Architects (AIA) Board of Trustees, and as co-chair of the Public Policy Board. He co-chaired the AIA Seattle Housing Task Force, organized numerous public programs on urban design, housing, and secondary suites (ADUs). He was named AIA Seattle Volunteer of the Year in 2020. He is a former member of the Southwest Design Review Board and Treasurer of Groundswell NW. In 2017, he co-founded MOAR (More Options for Accessory Residences), a grassroots organization that helped turn Seattle historical reform of the ADU. Seattle Magazine named Matt one of the 35 Most Influential People of 2019. He taught design at the University of Washington and Arizona State University.

The line opens at 6:25 p.m. Note that we have moved our conversation from our normal second Tuesday schedule due to the conflict with Election Day.

Sign up for the Zoom link and suggest a question if you have one:



Douglas Trumm

Doug is Executive Director of The Urbanist.

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Notes from the association of owners of the village of Verde | The Independent Green https://villageunderforest.com/notes-from-the-association-of-owners-of-the-village-of-verde-the-independent-green/ Thu, 10 Nov 2022 06:10:01 +0000 https://villageunderforest.com/notes-from-the-association-of-owners-of-the-village-of-verde-the-independent-green/ As the holiday season approaches and we gather with our friends and family, it seems like a good time to remind members of the community that the Verde Village Clubhouse has a spacious room for rent for receptions, birthdays or any other family event. The Clubhouse Hall is 2000 square feet, seats 100 people and […]]]>

As the holiday season approaches and we gather with our friends and family, it seems like a good time to remind members of the community that the Verde Village Clubhouse has a spacious room for rent for receptions, birthdays or any other family event.

The Clubhouse Hall is 2000 square feet, seats 100 people and has an adjoining commercial kitchen.

We provide tables, chairs and tablecloths. The Ranch House is also available to rent for a smaller room. The quiet setting, close to the river, has a wrap-around porch and plenty of parking. During the month of December, VVPOA members can rent the room with a 50% discount, non-members can rent the room with a 30% discount. Call the office at 928-646-6505 and leave a message. A volunteer will return your call with details or visit our website at vvpoa.net.

November’s Friday Night Dinner features spaghetti as a tribute to those who have come before us and who have raised funds for the pool and our organization for many years by providing this tasty and easy dish to the community. Join us November 11 from 5 to 6:30 p.m. for spaghetti, salad and dessert for $15. RSVP to vvpoa.net so we have plenty for everyone.

General Assembly – The second Tuesday of each month at 7 p.m. at the VVPOA Clubhouse

Agenda items will include:

VVPOA Presidential Appointments

Meet our new guardian

Updates on:

-ARPA Feasibility Study Grant

-Del Rio Pond

– Nature reserve

-Maintenance report

Any new business that attendees would like to discuss

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Newville’s Green Ridge Village displays tradition to honor its veterans | State https://villageunderforest.com/newvilles-green-ridge-village-displays-tradition-to-honor-its-veterans-state/ Mon, 07 Nov 2022 23:00:00 +0000 https://villageunderforest.com/newvilles-green-ridge-village-displays-tradition-to-honor-its-veterans-state/ A tribute to the service is displayed along the driveway leading to Green Ridge Village in Newville. For four years, staff have posted yard signs for the month of November to honor veterans who reside in the retirement community. “They served our country,” said Amanda Mylin, director of community life. “In everything they did, they […]]]>

A tribute to the service is displayed along the driveway leading to Green Ridge Village in Newville.

For four years, staff have posted yard signs for the month of November to honor veterans who reside in the retirement community.






Green Ridge Village in Newville displays signs with the names of their residents who have served in branches of the United States Armed Forces in honor of the upcoming 2022 Veterans Day.










Green Ridge Village

Green Ridge Village in Newville put up signs with the names of their residents who served in branches of the United States Armed Forces in honor of the upcoming 2022 Veterans Day.




Joseph Cress is a reporter for The Sentinel covering education and history. You can reach him at jcress@cumberlink.com or by calling 717-218-0022.

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Grant Approved for Trained Explosive Detection Dog in Goshen Village https://villageunderforest.com/grant-approved-for-trained-explosive-detection-dog-in-goshen-village/ Thu, 03 Nov 2022 21:59:39 +0000 https://villageunderforest.com/grant-approved-for-trained-explosive-detection-dog-in-goshen-village/ For the purchase of a dog trained in explosive detection, the Goshen Village Police Department received $50,000 federal funding under the Explosive Detection Canine Team Grant Program . “An explosives detection dog is a great tool for law enforcement,” said village police chief James Watt. The need for these types of trained dogs is real, […]]]>

For the purchase of a dog trained in explosive detection, the Goshen Village Police Department received $50,000 federal funding under the Explosive Detection Canine Team Grant Program .

“An explosives detection dog is a great tool for law enforcement,” said village police chief James Watt.

The need for these types of trained dogs is real, he says. Previously, the department purchased an explosives detection dog, named Mel, who died young in 2021. He was obtained through the same grant available now.

“We had a small vacancy here, but we’re looking to reclaim that capability,” Watt said. Especially, he noted, in light of recent threats of bombs and shootings at schools in Goshen. He said most uses for an explosives-trained dog are preventative, such as clearing buildings before and during large gatherings of people to make sure there are no explosives or weapons. fire in the building.

Explosives range from simple gunpowder to TNT to military-grade C4, which is basically used for making formal bombs, as well as mines. An explosives dog is trained to detect all types of explosives.

“We also use a dog to detect suspicious packages at events like the St. Patrick’s Day Parade, tracking missing and lost people and things, finding abandoned evidence and things of that nature,” Watt said. .

“We are happy to bring together another team. It’s handy to have one readily available. The team is only a phone call away at all times. When we plan larger events, we build detection time directly into operational plans,” he said.

Currently, the department must call the county or other communities if an explosives detection dog is needed, which takes longer.

Prior to his retirement from the force, Sgt. John Manna applied in 2020 for the Homeland Security and Emergency Services Grant, which is federally funded and administered by the New York State Division of Homeland Security and Emergency Services. The village police were notified of the grant approval on October 26, 2022.

Since the training academy starts in March 2023, the village will be looking to get a dog in January or February. Ideally, the dog will be between 2 and 12 months old; training usually begins between six and 12 months.

Canine Officer Jeremy Harter is currently researching breeders and dogs. Since explosive detection dogs are not trained in aggression, it is likely that a Labrador retriever type dog will be selected. Constable Harter has been with the department since September 2019; prior to that, he was a New York State Corrections Officer.

Obedience training for the dog, accompanied by Officer Harter, will begin in March, with explosives training beginning in the fall of 2023.

“We had a little lull with COVID, but things are picking up now – we like to be proactive and as safe as possible when we have community events and large gatherings of people. We can’t wait to get the dog here and put the team on duty. We really miss having this ability available to us. It came at a good time for us,” Watt said.

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Arthur Schmidt spearheading Loudonville’s plan to revitalize downtown https://villageunderforest.com/arthur-schmidt-spearheading-loudonvilles-plan-to-revitalize-downtown/ Mon, 31 Oct 2022 09:34:12 +0000 https://villageunderforest.com/arthur-schmidt-spearheading-loudonvilles-plan-to-revitalize-downtown/ LOUDONVILLE − Several months ago, the Mohican Area Growth Foundation (MAGF), at the request of the village mayor Jason VanSickle, began working to revitalize downtown. MAGF has hired OHM Advisorsan Ohio-based architecture, engineering and planning firm with offices in Cleveland, Akron and Columbus, to develop a plan to make downtown more popular with residents and […]]]>

LOUDONVILLE − Several months ago, the Mohican Area Growth Foundation (MAGF), at the request of the village mayor Jason VanSickle, began working to revitalize downtown.

MAGF has hired OHM Advisorsan Ohio-based architecture, engineering and planning firm with offices in Cleveland, Akron and Columbus, to develop a plan to make downtown more popular with residents and more attractive to visitors.

Central to this effort is Arthur Schmidt of Braunschweigproject manager and senior planner at OHM.

Schmidt said he and other team members are working with a downtown task force of residents who identify “issues, opportunities and ideas that would contribute to the plan we are tasked with developing. We will then develop a community survey where we will ask residents and others who use or enjoy downtown if the Steering Committee’s ideas are shared. At least some of these surveys will be sent home with village utility customers in their bills. We will also solicit information through flyers and other means to gauge what others think of the original ideas.

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JLB famous with a centenary gala https://villageunderforest.com/jlb-famous-with-a-centenary-gala/ Fri, 28 Oct 2022 09:26:30 +0000 https://villageunderforest.com/jlb-famous-with-a-centenary-gala/ The Birmingham Junior League is completing her 100th year with a celebration next month. The centenary gala will be the culminating celebration of the 100th anniversary of service and leadership of the JLB in the community of Birmingham. JLB members, community partners and city officials will come together to honor all that has been accomplished […]]]>

The Birmingham Junior League is completing her 100th year with a celebration next month.

The centenary gala will be the culminating celebration of the 100th anniversary of service and leadership of the JLB in the community of Birmingham. JLB members, community partners and city officials will come together to honor all that has been accomplished since the organization began.

The event will take place at Haven from 6 p.m. to 11 p.m. on December 10. The recording and the cocktail time will take place from 6 p.m. to 7 p.m., followed by a dinner seated at 7 p.m. and a reception and live music from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. pm

Stacey Ramsay and Kristin Ritter said they were honored to host the gala, an evening that has been in the making for more than five years.

“We are working with some amazing Birmingham-based businesses to make this an unforgettable event, and we look forward to bringing JLB members and community partners and supporters together in one room to celebrate our 100th anniversary,” they said. .

JLB’s goal is to improve life in the community by working with local agencies to provide services and assistance to people in need. The women’s organization is committed to promoting volunteerism, developing women’s potential and improving the community through the effective action and leadership of trained volunteers. Its goal is exclusively educational and charity.

The first general assembly of the JLB was held on 10 May 1922 at South Highland Presbyterian Church and 133 women attended. In September 2022, the organization had 2,013 members. The Birmingham Chapter is the eighth largest league in the world and one of the largest volunteer service organizations in Alabama.

In 2021, the JLB spent $1,629,780 in direct contributions to the Birmingham Metro community, and awarded $15,000 in university scholarships. Members have served a total of 45,000 volunteer hours, according to Kailee Daw, director of program operations for BridgeWays Alabama.

Martina Winston serves as JLB President 2022-23 and said the organization is truly something special – for the community, members, corporate sponsors and donors.

“Throughout our 100-year history, our impact has shown our passion for fulfilling our mission in everything we do,” Winston said. “As we continue to celebrate the second half of our centennial, I am honored to lead this organization as its 101st president. We have much to celebrate as our rich history and century-long impact have proven to be part of Birmingham’s DNA.

Winston said she was excited about their celebrations and recognitions, but it was also a unique opportunity to set the stage for many years to come. The objectives for this year’s league include:

Provide a five -year strategic plan that helps the JLB focus on carrying out its mission.

Assess areas of community impact to ensure the organization is providing support and resources where the community needs them most.

Re -engage active and support members after the pandemic.

Create new partnership opportunities with community and corporate partners to help JLB continue to meet community needs.

“Our members are what makes us special,” said Winston. “Our diversified organization led by volunteers and led by its members has some of the most intelligent, innovative, creative, amusing and daring women in the world. I can’t wait to change our world (Birmingham) this year while continuing to honor our past while forging our future.

“It is exciting to celebrate 100 years of impact in our community of Birmingham through our centenary gala, and we are looking forward to the next 100 years,” added Winston.

For more information on the Birmingham Junior League, Visit.jlbonline.com.

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Mandatory evacuation of the Good Samaritan village lifted; Town hall meeting tonight https://villageunderforest.com/mandatory-evacuation-of-the-good-samaritan-village-lifted-town-hall-meeting-tonight/ Mon, 24 Oct 2022 19:00:42 +0000 https://villageunderforest.com/mandatory-evacuation-of-the-good-samaritan-village-lifted-town-hall-meeting-tonight/ Body Osceola County officials announced Monday afternoon the mandatory evacuation order issued for Good Samaritan Society – Kissimmee Village after heavy rains from Hurricane Ian flooded the neighborhood, has been lifted. Since the floodwaters receded and power was restored to the community, the county was able to rescind the order that was put in place […]]]>

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Osceola County officials announced Monday afternoon the mandatory evacuation order issued for Good Samaritan Society – Kissimmee Village after heavy rains from Hurricane Ian flooded the neighborhood, has been lifted.

Since the floodwaters receded and power was restored to the community, the county was able to rescind the order that was put in place on September 30 for what the county said was, “the safety and well-being of residents of the Good Samaritan due to the continued presence of flood waters, flood damage, limited utilities, and necessary repairs to the community’s sewage treatment facility .

In a Monday statement, the county said oOfficials have been in contact with staff from the Good Samaritan Society and the Florida Department of Environmental Protection to ensure a plan is approved for the restoration of the community‘s sewage treatment facility, as well as a draft plan for the disposal of waste water. The County Office of Building Safety inspected structures for solvency and coordinated with utilities as needed to ensure safe restoration of service.

A public meeting is scheduled for this evening (Monday) at 6 p.m. at the Osceola County Housing and Community Services Building, located at 1392 E. Vine Street in the Mill Creek Plaza (at the corner of 192 and Michigan Street, near Cici’s Pizza). Representatives from local and federal resources, including FEMA, Insurance and Community Legal Services, and the Osceola Council on Aging and the Senior Resource Alliance, should be available.

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The new map is an illustrated insider’s guide to Greenwich Village https://villageunderforest.com/the-new-map-is-an-illustrated-insiders-guide-to-greenwich-village/ Thu, 20 Oct 2022 06:33:56 +0000 https://villageunderforest.com/the-new-map-is-an-illustrated-insiders-guide-to-greenwich-village/ BY LESLEY SUSSMAN | For nearly a decade, two Charles Street residents have traced their way from Elvis Presley’s favorite haunts in Memphis, Tennessee, to their new map of Greenwich Village, an illustrated insider’s guide to the sights and the must-see sounds that have made the community a must visit for tourists and New Yorkers […]]]>

BY LESLEY SUSSMAN | For nearly a decade, two Charles Street residents have traced their way from Elvis Presley’s favorite haunts in Memphis, Tennessee, to their new map of Greenwich Village, an illustrated insider’s guide to the sights and the must-see sounds that have made the community a must visit for tourists and New Yorkers alike.

For Alan Grossman, 77, and his late wife, Andrea Shaw – both lifelong Elvis fans – “The Memphis Map for Elvis Fans” was the definitive guide to enjoying Memphis and Graceland like Elvis did it. Now, in their “Where is Greenwich Village?” map, released this month, users will find 150 handpicked places to see in the neighborhood.

“These are famous places and hidden gems that you won’t discover on your iPhone,” Grossman said.

Grossman added that the map is a much-needed introduction for both local residents and tourists to a neighborhood once inhabited by Lenni Lenape Indians and that immigrants, rebels, artists and celebrities have all called home.

“It’s a map where almost 150 points of interest can be found in seven categories, including history, literature, art and architecture, film and television locations, music, theater and important educational sites,” he said.

“We felt that visitors – and even locals – needed a curated guide to see the neighborhood as it should be seen – up close and on foot – and a guide created by two longtime local residents who have lived in the neighborhood for many years.”

What’s next for Grossman? A map of the United States? The moon? The universe?”

He laughs at the question.

“That’s a good question,” he replied. “I’m not really sure. Maybe something a little closer to home, like our neighboring neighborhood, Chelsea. People also suggest Brooklyn. At this point, my team and I are looking around and thinking about it.

Interesting facts accompany the map.

His research and design team, he explained, consists primarily of former Charles Street resident Brigid McMenamin, writer and editor Karyn Feiden, and adjunct professor at Michael L. Kelly. Pratt who teaches undergraduate communications design and typographic information design.

So what’s behind this whole card business, Grossman asked. Is he card crazy? Is it some kind of magnificent obsession? Again, Grossman burst out laughing.

“No, it’s just that Andrea and I have always been interested in cards,” he explained. “We always made simple maps when we traveled, creating little maps to know the key places we wanted to go.

“Even when friends visited us from out of town, we would give them a little Google-like map of the village,” he said. “This map was something we thought of when we were in Memphis looking for Elvis’ favorite hangouts and we couldn’t find them.

“During the process of creating the map for the Elvis fans, people in Memphis kept asking us where we were from, and we told them New York. And they were intrigued whether or not no we had made a map of where we lived in. It got us thinking and Andrea loved the idea of ​​making a map of our own neighborhood.

Children’s writer Margaret Wise Brown lived in the clapboard farm at 121 Charles Street, one of the map’s landmarks. (Photo by Le Soleil du Village)

Asked about the two or three best places he discovered in his own neighborhood that he didn’t really know well having lived here for years, Grossman said they included 16 Barrow St., the home of Hank Greenberg, the “Hebrew Hammer”. and prodigious home run hitter; Cobble Court at 121 Charles St., a wooden house that was once home to Margaret Wise Brown, author of the children’s classic “Goodnight Moon,” and the Sanctum Sanctorum at 177A Bleeker St., the mythical mansion of Dr. Strange, the Sorcerer Supreme, a Marvel Comics book hero and, later, the subject of a Walt Disney film.

He added that map users will learn where to find “counterculture hotspots and literary watering holes, as well as legendary entertainment spaces and distinctive architecture. They will also learn about the role the gay community has played in the neighborhood and the historical contributions of African Americans.

Shaw died in 2016. Creating the map took longer than expected, Grossman said, due to the COVID health crisis.

“In 2013 and 2014, we started the process of creating the map, but the places were closing due to COVID,” he recalls. “We had to keep redoing the map. It was also difficult to reunite with people who were self-isolating. We originally included many interesting bars and restaurants but suddenly they all closed.

The “Where is Greenwich Village?” The card, which sells for $12.95, is currently sold at Three Lives & Company Bookstore, 154 W. 10th St., and on Amazon.

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