Village community – Village Under Forest http://villageunderforest.com/ Just another WordPress site Tue, 21 Sep 2021 16:30:27 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://villageunderforest.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-2021-06-25T171231.357-150x150.png Village community – Village Under Forest http://villageunderforest.com/ 32 32 Canton of Hanover partners with village of Bartlett to offer health check-ups https://villageunderforest.com/canton-of-hanover-partners-with-village-of-bartlett-to-offer-health-check-ups/ https://villageunderforest.com/canton-of-hanover-partners-with-village-of-bartlett-to-offer-health-check-ups/#respond Tue, 21 Sep 2021 16:30:27 +0000 https://villageunderforest.com/canton-of-hanover-partners-with-village-of-bartlett-to-offer-health-check-ups/ Nurses from the Canton of Hanover will be offering free medical examinations at Bartlett Village Hall, 228 S. Main Street on September 29 in recognition of World Heart Day. Open to all, residents can come from 9:30 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. to receive hemoglobin, diabetes and blood pressure tests. “Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading […]]]>

Nurses from the Canton of Hanover will be offering free medical examinations at Bartlett Village Hall, 228 S. Main Street on September 29 in recognition of World Heart Day. Open to all, residents can come from 9:30 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. to receive hemoglobin, diabetes and blood pressure tests.

“Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of death worldwide,” said Kristen Smith, director of community health for the Township of Hanover. “Screenings provide insight into potential health issues and reassure residents who have had concerns or have a family history of CVD. “

Screenings last approximately 10 minutes and walk-ins are welcome. To make an appointment, please dial (630) 540-5906.


Source link

]]>
https://villageunderforest.com/canton-of-hanover-partners-with-village-of-bartlett-to-offer-health-check-ups/feed/ 0
The camera will help police enforce speeding tickets on I-271 in Mayfield; tickets will be sent by mail https://villageunderforest.com/the-camera-will-help-police-enforce-speeding-tickets-on-i-271-in-mayfield-tickets-will-be-sent-by-mail/ https://villageunderforest.com/the-camera-will-help-police-enforce-speeding-tickets-on-i-271-in-mayfield-tickets-will-be-sent-by-mail/#respond Tue, 21 Sep 2021 04:29:49 +0000 https://villageunderforest.com/the-camera-will-help-police-enforce-speeding-tickets-on-i-271-in-mayfield-tickets-will-be-sent-by-mail/ MAYFIELD, Ohio – Motorists traveling on Interstate 271 in Mayfield may want to check their speedometers – and their desire to drive really fast. In about 30 days, Mayfield Police will begin using a manual camera on the highway strip they oversee to identify and photograph speeding tickets. The camera, police chief Paul Matias hopes, […]]]>

MAYFIELD, Ohio – Motorists traveling on Interstate 271 in Mayfield may want to check their speedometers – and their desire to drive really fast.

In about 30 days, Mayfield Police will begin using a manual camera on the highway strip they oversee to identify and photograph speeding tickets. The camera, police chief Paul Matias hopes, will be used to slow down motorists on the highway.

“The point here is not to write tickets,” Matias said shortly after the village council on Monday (September 20) unanimously approved the use of the camera. “The goal is to make people slow down. “

With fewer officers on the roads in many communities, a number of motorists since last spring have started driving faster than before the pandemic. The speeds have increased so much, said Matias: “The average speeder we are recording is going at 89 mph. Two years ago it was very rare for us to accuse someone of going so fast. “

The Ohio Department of Transportation noted a 102 percent increase over the past year in vehicles traveling above 85 mph.

“What we’re trying to build is a perception,” said Matias. “The reason people drive like this is because they know there aren’t a lot of officers on the roads right now to enforce traffic, for various reasons, so they don’t. don’t have this perception that ‘I have to drive at a reasonable speed or I’ll get a ticket.’

“And by doing that (camera program), we make it look like if you go through Mayfield Village at 90 mph, you’re either going to get stopped by an officer or we’re going to send you a $ 300 ticket. deterrent effect. “

Safety, for both police and drivers, is at the heart of the new program. The camera will photograph the speeder, then a ticket and a fine will be sent to the car owner without a potentially dangerous roadside check having to be performed.

“We’re basically still doing the same thing that we did (in terms of speeder monitoring),” said Matias. “We don’t just put a camera on the highway that works by itself. The officer is up there (on the highway).

“The only thing we remove is when we take off in traffic, knock the person over and stop the traffic on the side of the road with the traffic passing by. It uses technology to say “OK, we’ve got you,” but instead of chasing you, we’ll just send you a ticket in the mail. “

Fines for speeding will be $ 150 for driving 1 to 19 mph over the 60 mph speed limit, $ 200 for driving 20 to 29 mph over the speed limit and $ 300 to drive at 90 mph (30 mph over the speed limit) or faster.

According to the ordinance, those fined will have 30 days to pay. If payment is not made within this time, $ 20 will be added to the fine. If not paid within 60 days, an additional $ 20 will be added and the fine will be recovered through civil suit or “other appropriate means of collection.”

Mayfield will join Newburgh Heights to use the technology, although Matias points out that Newburgh Heights uses a handheld camera as well as stationary cameras.

“We will constantly evaluate (the effectiveness of the program),” he said. “I will look at the data we collect and as this program progresses we will see if it has an impact. You need a good sample of data.

“Will we see an immediate impact? I do not know. I guess it depends on how many people are aware of it and how seriously they take it. “

The village will pay the Gatso company for the rented camera by sharing 38% of the fines received for its use. Gatso will only receive a share of the fines generated by the camera and will not receive a share of the fines generated by other MVPD law enforcement services.

Mayfield Village border, on I-271 northbound, is located just north of the Ridgebury Boulevard overpass and continues to the Lake County border at White Road. Heading south on I-271, Mayfield begins at Wilson Mills Road and continues just before the Ridgebury Viaduct.

Matias said the app will take place primarily during the morning and afternoon rush hours.

Since car owners will receive the ticket in the mail, a liability transfer will be included in the shipment for cases where the owner was not the person driving when the violation occurred. Gatso will then send a quote to the person driving.

Matias first presented the idea to the village council in June, via a letter, and the council first discussed it in July. The bill was adopted on Monday at first reading.

Success of the cruise evening

The city’s annual Cruise Night, in which vintage cars parade along Wilson Mills Road, took place on Saturday (September 18) instead of its usual June date. The pandemic pushed the event backwards, and recreation director Shane McAvinew feared its three-month delay could lead to a decrease in the number of car owners.

It turned out that such concerns for the 30-year tradition were unwarranted.

“It was a huge success,” said Council Chairman Stephen Schutt. “I think it was the biggest night on a cruise we’ve had, probably ever. It was a fantastic event.

Mayor Brenda Bodnar said: “It was a beautiful evening. It was very busy. We got a lot of compliments in the evening. We also received compliments on the beauty of the village the following Sunday morning. You couldn’t tell that a night cruise had happened the day before.

Bodnar and Schutt thanked all the workers in the village who made the evening a success, as well as the many volunteers at the event.

Read more of the Messenger of the Sun.


Source link

]]>
https://villageunderforest.com/the-camera-will-help-police-enforce-speeding-tickets-on-i-271-in-mayfield-tickets-will-be-sent-by-mail/feed/ 0
Dunleavy administration and businesses send more fish to Yukon River communities – Mike Dunleavy https://villageunderforest.com/dunleavy-administration-and-businesses-send-more-fish-to-yukon-river-communities-mike-dunleavy/ https://villageunderforest.com/dunleavy-administration-and-businesses-send-more-fish-to-yukon-river-communities-mike-dunleavy/#respond Mon, 20 Sep 2021 17:32:36 +0000 https://villageunderforest.com/dunleavy-administration-and-businesses-send-more-fish-to-yukon-river-communities-mike-dunleavy/ Alaska Governor Mike Dunleavy is happy to see another shipment of salmon head for the Yukon River, an area struggling with low fish escapements this summer. The state of Alaska recently sent shipments of salmon worth $ 60,000 and helped coordinate a $ 40,000 donation from four companies. Due to historically low returns of king […]]]>

Alaska Governor Mike Dunleavy is happy to see another shipment of salmon head for the Yukon River, an area struggling with low fish escapements this summer. The state of Alaska recently sent shipments of salmon worth $ 60,000 and helped coordinate a $ 40,000 donation from four companies. Due to historically low returns of king and chum salmon to the Yukon, residents were unable to participate in commercial or subsistence fishing activities in 2021.

“It has been a huge team effort to get the salmon into the hands of our fellow Alaskans in need. Salmon are vital to the people of the Yukon, and my administration was not going to sit on the sidelines while our rural communities struggled to put food on the table, ” Governor Dunleavy said. “The people of Alaska are at their best when the going gets tough. I am grateful for the strong partnerships and collaboration between local businesses, tribal and village leaders, seafood processors and shipping companies who have all played a vital role in the success of this project.

Twelve thousand pounds of salmon were purchased from Copper River Seafoods, by the state, and shipped last week to communities along the upper and lower Yukon. Six thousand pounds were trucked to Fairbanks by Lynden Transport Inc. and 6,000 pounds were flown to Emmonak by Everts Air. The Tanana Chiefs Conference will distribute the salmon from Fairbanks, and Kwik’Pak Fisheries will distribute the salmon from Emmonak.

Donated salmon are loaded onto the Everts Air Cargo DC-6 at Ted Stevens Anchorage International Airport. (Click here for more pictures)

Thanks to Donlin Gold, Doyon, Limited, Calista Corporation and Nova Minerals who generously donated $ 10,000 each, an additional 8,000 pounds of salmon were shipped this week to communities in the Yukon region. Three thousand pounds from Doyon, Limited and Nova Minerals were trucked to Fairbanks yesterday, and 5,000 pounds from Calista Corporation, Donlin Gold and Nova Minerals were flown to Emmonak today.

“Participation in this fish donation program in the Lower Yukon Delta region aligns with Calista’s vision for cultural stewardship and corporate responsibility. Taking care of our neighbors is also a fundamental value of our culture and our company. “- Andrew Guy, Calista Corp. President / CEO

“I am proud to represent Nova Minerals, especially today with this initiative to donate fish to remote villages. When the governor called us, we were quick to step forward with our other industry partners in this effort. As a natural resource company, Nova focuses on community support and sustainability as key pillars of our operations and our social license. On a personal level, I am Alaskan, so when other Alaskans are in need, we lend a helping hand, it is that simple. I told the governor to put Nova Minerals on speed dial, for this or any future initiative like this that requires reliable partners. Nova Minerals has a long term commitment to Alaska with jobs and helping to support and build stronger communities. ” – Christopher Gerteisen, CEO / Director of Nova Minerals

“It is an honor to support this partnership alongside Calista Corporation, to bring fish to Yukon communities. In addition to food security, it is about Alaska’s native values ​​of sharing and cultural identity related to fish. Donlin is committed to responsible development and meeting the needs of YK communities today and into the future. Kristina Woolston, Director of External Affairs at Donlin Gold.

Today’s announcement by Governor Dunleavy to purchase 12,000 pounds of salmon builds on the state’s previous purchase of $ 75,000. To date, the state has purchased $ 135,000 worth of salmon, totaling 37,000 pounds, to donate to Yukon River communities hit hard by poor salmon runs. In addition to state purchases, Governor Dunleavy’s administration facilitated and led efforts to secure donations of 33,000 pounds of salmon for residents of the Yukon region. With all efforts totaling over 70,000 pounds of salmon.

###


Source link

]]>
https://villageunderforest.com/dunleavy-administration-and-businesses-send-more-fish-to-yukon-river-communities-mike-dunleavy/feed/ 0
Memorial celebrates the women of Holly, past and present • Oakland County Times https://villageunderforest.com/memorial-celebrates-the-women-of-holly-past-and-present-oakland-county-times/ https://villageunderforest.com/memorial-celebrates-the-women-of-holly-past-and-present-oakland-county-times/#respond Mon, 20 Sep 2021 01:04:56 +0000 https://villageunderforest.com/memorial-celebrates-the-women-of-holly-past-and-present-oakland-county-times/ Memorial celebrates Holly’s women, past and present Memorial celebrates Holly’s women, past and present (Crystal A. Proxmire, September 19, 2021) Holly, MI – A new memorial at the Village of Holly’s Waterworks Park honors 100 women – from today’s hardworking heroines to community history. The effort arose out of a research project by local historian […]]]>

Memorial celebrates Holly’s women, past and present

Memorial celebrates Holly’s women, past and present

(Crystal A. Proxmire, September 19, 2021)

Holly, MI – A new memorial at the Village of Holly’s Waterworks Park honors 100 women – from today’s hardworking heroines to community history. The effort arose out of a research project by local historian Joe Mishler and the organizational efforts of Holly ACTS (Action, Community Transformation, Solidarity), working with the village and other groups to gather information, create plaque and clean up the park so that visitors can see and enjoy the Shiawassee River.

Included are the women who shaped local government, the library, Holly Area Youth Assistance, suffragists, women business leaders, philanthropists, and those who served in the military or as first responders. A recent unveiling ceremony saw dozens of visitors braving the hot and humid morning to celebrate and reflect.

“As the research began, it became clear that the list was going to be long,” said organizer Kristin Koppa-Watt, founder of Holly ACTS and owner of the recently opened Thoughtful Threads store. “At some point throughout During the trip, a comment was made that we might have TOO MANY women on the list, but I’m saying… over the course of 183 years, 80-100 women won’t be enough and won’t even surface.

“Then it became evident that we still have so many women alive who have and continue to do so much in all kinds of specters. Why on earth would we wait until someone is gone to congratulate them, validate their service, and let them know how wonderful they are?

“So this event became part of this plan. We sincerely thank each of you for being here today to celebrate each other and our community. “

The discussion began between Mishler talking to Watt about his research project on Holly’s historical women, including Elizabeth “Ma” Parry who ran the Lakeview maternity home out of her home in the 1950s. “Her story and the selfless work she’s dedicated her life to here at Holly touched me so much that I walked away from there with this need to know more, “said Watt.

“Some examples of women who transformed Holly are Martha Alger, Phoebe Divine who started the George Washington Club, Elizabeth Ma Parry whom I mentioned earlier, Winifred Mott A suffragist and activist of the Women’s Christian Temperance Movement, Joyce Slaughter who was treasurer of Rose Township for decades and helped start Headwater Trails with Sue Julian and Sherlyn Everly, Elizabeth Hamilton who performed interpretive and educational plays for festivals, Maxine Howe who was justice of the peace and served on Holly’s village council in the 1950s and 1960s, Martha Alexander who was a life member of the Holly chapter of the Order of the Eastern Star, Dorothy Alice Garant who worked for Holly Volunteer Ambulance and a longtime school bus driver. She was one of the women known to help bake birthday cakes for children in the community, and a longtime Girl Scout leader. “

Watt also spoke about Rosemary Kelly, founder of the Rose Hill Center.

“Rosemary and her husband Dan are not from Holly, but they helped us market ourselves and develop the Rose Hill Center in the township behind the National Cemetery 30 years ago. Their son John was diagnosed with schizophrenia many years ago when therapies were not widely available. When they finally found a unique treatment center in Boston that helped their son, they decided to create a place for their son and hundreds of others over the past 30 years to receive cutting edge treatment and stabilization therapies for people with severe mental illness. . It is one of only 6 in the country and people come from all over the country looking for hope and healing. Rosemary didn’t have a road for her son, so she created one for him and changed thousands of lives thanks to those she touched. They chose Holly as their place to do it and it is thriving today, ”she said.

Mishler’s portion of the presentation included stories from local women in the military. This included Amber Kier Ogg who graduated from Holly High School 2001. “In an effort to pay for her education, she joined the US military – the Michigan National Guard. She served with the military police unit from 1775. She was deployed to Iraq in May 2003. Her unit was protecting convoys that were the target of terrorists, ”he said.

“One day, while she was leading a convoy, her vehicle was struck by an IED. The explosion went through the side windows and missed Amber. The main explosion missed Amber, but not pieces. the team leader was injured and the gunman was killed. The vehicle stopped and Amber got out and engaged the enemy. At one point, she couldn’t see and thought it was dust and dirt. It was his blood.

“Wounded in combat, Amber would be released with a disability. She lost good friends in the action. She joined the long list of Holly’s who served and were wounded in combat. The scars and memories are permanent and Amber has paid a heavy price for serving her country.

He also spoke of Sarah Emma Edmunds who had left her home in Canada rather than being pressured into an unwanted marriage. She became a traveling bookseller and settled in Rose Twp, but felt drawn to becoming a soldier. She introduced herself as a man named Frank and successfully joined the 2sd Michigan Infantry to fight in the Civil War as a Union Soldier. She deserted when she caught malaria rather than being discovered, but when she recovered she returned to the war effort as a nurse.

“After the war, her war wounds bothered her. She went to a 2nd Michigan reunion in Flint and all was forgiven. Frank was well loved and respected. Desertion was wiped off the books and she received a pension of $ 12 per month and is the only woman buried in a national cemetery as a Civil War soldier, ”Mishler said.

Nicole Edwards Rankin shared a certain story, including the story of a time when women were not allowed to vote. She spoke about the successful women in her family and the milestones women have taken throughout history – such as her great-grandmother who was the only woman to serve on the Flint Grocers board in years. 1950, and his grandmother who was the first woman to hold a position as a man. to the AC spark plug.

“Despite all the progress we have made, there is still a long way to go. Gender norms are perpetuated by the division of labor inside and outside the home. Women always earn less money for the same jobs as a man. Highly qualified women are always overlooked for a position and a less qualified club member is hired instead, ”she said.

“Women are under-represented in politics. In Oakland County, there are only two villages with women council chairs, and there is only one village council made up of all women …

“I hope you leave today feeling inspired by the women listed on this memorial, by those who are here today, and by the women in your own life who have inspired you to do more.”

Speakers also included Police Chief Jerry Narsh, Fire Chief Steve Mcgee, Ina Golden of Hometown Heroes, Library Board Chair April Brandon, Dance Teacher Angie Broegman, City Councilor Ryan Delaney, Jennifer Shannon and Congresswoman Elissa Slotkin.


Source link

]]>
https://villageunderforest.com/memorial-celebrates-the-women-of-holly-past-and-present-oakland-county-times/feed/ 0
Swansea Police hire first black officers, reflecting changing demographics https://villageunderforest.com/swansea-police-hire-first-black-officers-reflecting-changing-demographics/ https://villageunderforest.com/swansea-police-hire-first-black-officers-reflecting-changing-demographics/#respond Sun, 19 Sep 2021 13:40:00 +0000 https://villageunderforest.com/swansea-police-hire-first-black-officers-reflecting-changing-demographics/ SWANSEA – Swansea Police Department recently sworn in to its first black officers – Darrell Dunn and Jonathan Williams – which officials say is an important reflection of the increased diversity in the village. Non-white residents now make up 35% of the village of 14,400, according to the 2020 census. Between 2010 and 2020, the […]]]>

SWANSEA – Swansea Police Department recently sworn in to its first black officers Darrell Dunn and Jonathan Williams – which officials say is an important reflection of the increased diversity in the village.

Non-white residents now make up 35% of the village of 14,400, according to the 2020 census. Between 2010 and 2020, the black population increased by 6 percentage points, reaching 23% of the population.

“We are now working very hard to diversify,” Swansea Mayor Mike Leopold said. “It’s something, frankly, we should have done years ago, but we’re doing it now.”

Police Chief Steve Johnson has similar feelings.

“It always turned out that we had great qualified candidates on our roster and then another community would hire them first before bringing them in,” he said.

Johnson said this time Swansea was the one attracting qualified officers from other towns. Williams and Dunn worked for other departments, including those of St. Louis, Chesterfield and Ferguson.

“We like to bring experienced people here who can see what the community of Swansea is like,” Johnson said, citing the new officers’ past experiences as social workers, substitute teachers, paramedics and firefighters.

For Williams, the move of the Metropolitan Police Department from St. Louis to Swansea was natural. He said he had strong ties to the community of Swansea, having worked at a local college and nursing home before going to law enforcement.

“Most of us start this job because we love helping people and meeting citizens,” he said. The citizens are the most important part, and it is a department that is committed to working with them.

Swansea’s hires come at a time when other local departments are struggling to recruit new staff.

“These days, it’s not easy to hire new police officers because not many people want to be them,” said Leopold. “We struggled to find good quality candidates.”

Belleville recently dropped residency requirements for city employees in part to facilitate the internal promotion of the police service. St. Clair County Sheriff made a similar request regarding residency, citing recruitment difficulties.

For Johnson, Swansea’s ability to recruit new officers reflects the quality of the force’s existing officers and how visible the department is beyond arrests, such as at community events and academies. He added that he was excited to see how the expertise his new agents bring fits into the larger department.

“There is so much more to law enforcement than just arresting bad guys, especially in 2021,” he said. “Their mindset is about building relationships. “

Eric Schmid covers Metro East for St. Louis Public Radio as part of the Journalism Fellowship Program: Report for America, an initiative of the GroundTruth project.


Source link

]]>
https://villageunderforest.com/swansea-police-hire-first-black-officers-reflecting-changing-demographics/feed/ 0
Business Intel: Cardinal Bicycle opens store in Grandin Village | Local company https://villageunderforest.com/business-intel-cardinal-bicycle-opens-store-in-grandin-village-local-company/ https://villageunderforest.com/business-intel-cardinal-bicycle-opens-store-in-grandin-village-local-company/#respond Sun, 19 Sep 2021 02:00:00 +0000 https://villageunderforest.com/business-intel-cardinal-bicycle-opens-store-in-grandin-village-local-company/ Cardinal Bicycle opened its new Grandin Village location, located in the former Mick-or-Mack, earlier this month. Cardinal Bicycle has a dedicated service department at the back of its Grandin Village store. The Cardinal Bicycle Shop in Grandin Village has a cafe serving breakfast and lunch, as well as coffee, beer and wine. Cardinal Bicycle has […]]]>

Cardinal bike opened its Grandin Village location, which also has a cafe.

The bicycle shop is located in the old Mick or Mack building. Owner Whit Ellerman said it offered a central location, the ability for customers to safely get to the store via the bike paths and greenway, and parking for testing. Additionally, he said, businesses located in Grandin Village tend to have strong neighborhood support.

The 11,000 square foot space includes not only retail space and warehouses, but also a bar where customers can order and enjoy food and drinks, a service department, a large studio for services fitting and a community room, according to Ellerman, which could eventually be used for things like product demonstrations and lectures.

Ellerman said the store looks similar to the Orange Avenue location, with the exception of the cafe, which is a new addition to Cardinal Bicycle’s offerings. At the start of the pandemic, when the Orange Avenue store moved its retail operations outside, the interior was refreshed to reflect what was planned for Grandin Village.

Support local journalism

Your subscription makes our report possible.

{{featured_button_text}}

“The key has always been, both from a business standpoint and from a customer experience standpoint, that it’s still a bike shop with two locations,” he said. .

Ellerman and his wife are co-owners of The river and the rail and Crystal Spring Grocery Co. He said they liked the idea of ​​incorporating catering and hospitality elements into the cycling industry.


Source link

]]>
https://villageunderforest.com/business-intel-cardinal-bicycle-opens-store-in-grandin-village-local-company/feed/ 0
315 Military Moms Honor Veterans in Sandy Creek, Lacona – Oswego County Today https://villageunderforest.com/315-military-moms-honor-veterans-in-sandy-creek-lacona-oswego-county-today/ https://villageunderforest.com/315-military-moms-honor-veterans-in-sandy-creek-lacona-oswego-county-today/#respond Sat, 18 Sep 2021 11:02:42 +0000 https://villageunderforest.com/315-military-moms-honor-veterans-in-sandy-creek-lacona-oswego-county-today/ From left to right: Shylo LaRue, Renee DeLosh, Jessica Kimball, Heidi Metott, Jessica Balcom. Missing from the photo: Jennifer Pappa and Cheryl Blount. Photo by Michael Johnson. OSWEGO COUNTY – A determined group of patriotic mothers have managed to place colorful banners honoring the veterans of Sandy Creek and Lacona along the quiet streets of […]]]>
From left to right: Shylo LaRue, Renee DeLosh, Jessica Kimball, Heidi Metott, Jessica Balcom. Missing from the photo: Jennifer Pappa and Cheryl Blount. Photo by Michael Johnson.

OSWEGO COUNTY – A determined group of patriotic mothers have managed to place colorful banners honoring the veterans of Sandy Creek and Lacona along the quiet streets of these northern villages.

The region has benefited from the sacrifices made by generations of young men and women who have served their country in all branches of the military. Now, many of these hometown heroes are honored and remembered with their names and faces displayed on banners lining the Twin Villages.

The proud families of these soldiers now have the opportunity to remember their loved ones and share their pride with the entire community.

“A lot of people in this area serve in the military, and a lot of people don’t know how many of their neighbors are veterans,” said Renee DeLosh, 315 Military Moms member, resident of Sandy Creek. “We have decided that we have to honor our local heroes by creating the banner program.”

Sandy Creek resident and 315 Military Moms member Heidi Metott said she feels she has a lot in common with other military parents.

“It all started as a conversation between Renee and myself,” said Metott. “We started this project together and along the way we made great friendships and beautified the community as well. “

The moms got the ball rolling with presentations to the Sandy Creek and Lacona Village boards of directors.

“Both boards have been overwhelmingly supportive,” DeLosh said. “And then we had to calculate the costs and find a printer for the banners. “

The group then created an application for family members to fill out, listing the information to accompany the veteran’s photo on the banner.

“We then started fundraising, with several events including a chicken barbecue and a can and bottle drive, and we found tremendous support within the community,” said Metott.

Hanging up the banners required the assistance of professionals and specialized equipment. Fortunately, CAM Tree Service offered to help the moms and moved quickly and efficiently through the villages and got the job done. Chad and Mason LaRue hung the banners for free, making a huge contribution to the project.

Family members of veterans who wish to honor a military member can contact the 315 Military Moms through the group’s Facebook page, 315 military moms, or pick up a claim at Sandy Creek Town Hall, Nate Barber Shop, or Cable Trail VFW in Lacona.

“My two children are both active in the military and I see them every day as I drive down the road,” DeLosh said. “I’m very proud to have been a part of this, and we just want it to continue and grow.”

When the banners first appeared, hundreds of community members responded positively to Mom’s efforts.

“The relationships that I have built by doing this have brought me through the past two years,” said Metott, “The images of my two kids and my dad are hanging now, and I’m so proud.”

Residents of northern Oswego County have served in the military since the American Revolutionary War. The well-known story of The Great Rope is an important reminder of the region’s involvement in the War of 1812, and many men volunteered to fight slavery during the Civil War and in all the wars that followed.

The families of these hometown heroes are now able to keep their veterans at the forefront of the community spirit, hanging their likenesses on the tree-lined streets of Sandy Creek and Lacona.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.


Source link

]]>
https://villageunderforest.com/315-military-moms-honor-veterans-in-sandy-creek-lacona-oswego-county-today/feed/ 0
Campbell County group innovates community center to help veterans heal https://villageunderforest.com/campbell-county-group-innovates-community-center-to-help-veterans-heal/ https://villageunderforest.com/campbell-county-group-innovates-community-center-to-help-veterans-heal/#respond Fri, 17 Sep 2021 22:20:56 +0000 https://villageunderforest.com/campbell-county-group-innovates-community-center-to-help-veterans-heal/ CAMPBELL COUNTY, Virginia. – The National Center for Healthy Veterans inaugurated a community center at Valor Farm in Altavista on Friday. The complex includes a living room, kitchen, meeting space, laundry room and weight rooms. It is a multi-purpose building whose purpose is to help recovering veterans. “The idea is that everything takes place in […]]]>

CAMPBELL COUNTY, Virginia. – The National Center for Healthy Veterans inaugurated a community center at Valor Farm in Altavista on Friday.

The complex includes a living room, kitchen, meeting space, laundry room and weight rooms.

It is a multi-purpose building whose purpose is to help recovering veterans.

“The idea is that everything takes place in the community center. It’s to really discourage isolation, ”said Ben King, COO of Quarry View Building Group.

A community center is planned for the five villages. Each village will be made up of 20 mini-houses for veterans.

Retired Army General Jeff Horne heads day-to-day operations and says the centers are vital.

“The houses are designed for [veterans] be able to enjoy their time here on the farm, but as individuals [the community center] is a place where they come together to celebrate as a team, ”said Horne.

A d

They are still building the first four houses, funded largely by a group from Lancaster County, Pennsylvania.

The organization names the first village after the group, where veterans will spend time healing.

“Healing means more than just physical healing. Healing means psychological counseling, but also spiritual counseling. Reconnecting with what is important and understanding that they are valuable and that they are going to be able to thrive again is a really important part of what we do here, ”said veteran Daniel Gade, who is on the board. board of directors for the National Center for Healthy Veterans.

The first community center is expected to be completed in early 2022.

Copyright 2021 by WSLS 10 – All rights reserved.


Source link

]]>
https://villageunderforest.com/campbell-county-group-innovates-community-center-to-help-veterans-heal/feed/ 0
Building a Better Block: accelerating park planning for the Forest Audelia Village demonstration https://villageunderforest.com/building-a-better-block-accelerating-park-planning-for-the-forest-audelia-village-demonstration/ https://villageunderforest.com/building-a-better-block-accelerating-park-planning-for-the-forest-audelia-village-demonstration/#respond Fri, 17 Sep 2021 13:40:37 +0000 https://villageunderforest.com/building-a-better-block-accelerating-park-planning-for-the-forest-audelia-village-demonstration/ A render shows what the play area should look like during the completed park demonstration at Forest Audelia Village. Images courtesy of Better Block. Plan to hear flamenco music fluttering through the Forest Audelia Village car park this month of October. This is one of the many activities planned for the month-long demonstration for the […]]]>

A render shows what the play area should look like during the completed park demonstration at Forest Audelia Village. Images courtesy of Better Block.

Plan to hear flamenco music fluttering through the Forest Audelia Village car park this month of October.

This is one of the many activities planned for the month-long demonstration for the Better Block park being built in the parking lot. Daily programming, including homework help, fitness programs, free meals, yoga, and drama and creative writing workshops, is scheduled from October 15 to November 15. 14.

The ideas don’t stop there. About 40 other pop-up food vendors, bands and other arts and culture activities are making their way onto the list, said Kristin Leiber, senior project manager.

Each of these activities will fit within approximately 50 feet by 70 feet temporary park space under construction until opening. In this area there is a basketball court; open green space with shade, lights and seating; and a children’s play area with play blocks and rubber play tiles. A pedestrian path borders the perimeter, and a pedestrian crossing connects the event to the surrounding shopping center.

The design was modeled around feedback from residents and community leaders over the past few months.

“I think some people are still wondering how to use a space like this. And that’s kind of what this month-long demonstration is for, it’s testing a lot of different things, ”says Leiber.

The goal of Better Block is to help brainstorm and execute temporary constructions across Dallas and to encourage the community to rethink how a space can be defined. This, in turn, aims to empower neighbors to make changes and build their own in the future. For Forest Audelia Village, this demonstration is supposed to give some ideas of what a park might look like on this street corner.

The duration of this project is different from some of Better Block’s earlier work, where activation and construction takes less than two weeks.

“I think we’re seeing the benefits of longer, more measured approaches where we’re able to collect more meaningful stats, work with longer-term partnerships, and then really turn things around after we’re gone so that they can kind of keep up the good work.

This turned out to be true with the MLK Food Park on Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard in southeast Dallas, which has remained an active food park since its temporary installation this spring.

Placing a temporary protest in Forest Audelia Village is a step towards more positive energy in the region, said Denita Jones, bloc captain and local activist. Jones has lived in the area for four years and is delighted to see concrete steps being taken there.

“We are often excluded from the conversation and we are also excluded from economic development,” says Jones. “It’s important that people feel included in things… to bring the community here and to let the community have something to be proud of.

In Jones’ eyes, it’s also about bringing Lake Highlands together and making it clear that both sides of 635 are part of the neighborhood. The Lake Highland Moms Against Racism, a group that Jones leads and helped create, plans to hold their weekly meetings at Forest Audelia Village while the protest is underway.

“It’s totally appropriate to be involved in that, and bring the… play dates that usually take place in White Rock Lake… and bring them here to this side of 635,” Jones said.

Neighbors can view and schedule events on Best Block’s page dedicated to the Park at Forest-Audelia.

Creating a gathering and learning space for the community helps fill those who participate, says Rosanne Messineo Mills, neighborhood captain and new urban planning expert. As a neighborhood leader, she determines what neighbors need – activities like self-defense classes, health clinics, and library programs.

“What’s so amazing about organizations like Better Block is that out of thin air, there is something created that meets the needs and wants of the community,” says Mills.

Construction will begin in the coming weeks and neighbors are invited to join the community from October 11.

“It all started with the relocation of a bus stop,” City Councilor Adam McGough said at the project kickoff event. “Little by little, things are improving… We are planting a stake in the ground. And we will do whatever we can to improve this area.

Information tours like this are planned for the next Forest Audelia Village demonstration.


Source link

]]>
https://villageunderforest.com/building-a-better-block-accelerating-park-planning-for-the-forest-audelia-village-demonstration/feed/ 0
Raleigh family hope new children’s community center will reduce crime https://villageunderforest.com/raleigh-family-hope-new-childrens-community-center-will-reduce-crime/ https://villageunderforest.com/raleigh-family-hope-new-childrens-community-center-will-reduce-crime/#respond Fri, 17 Sep 2021 01:57:17 +0000 https://villageunderforest.com/raleigh-family-hope-new-childrens-community-center-will-reduce-crime/ MEMPHIS, Tenn. – A family in Raleigh is trying to fight crime by opening a new community center in the community. The center near Yale and Ramill Road is designed to keep kids out of trouble by providing fun and positive activities. Rachel Nolen runs the establishment. “[Children] want this, ”she said. “They need this, […]]]>

MEMPHIS, Tenn. – A family in Raleigh is trying to fight crime by opening a new community center in the community.

The center near Yale and Ramill Road is designed to keep kids out of trouble by providing fun and positive activities. Rachel Nolen runs the establishment.

“[Children] want this, ”she said. “They need this, but it takes a village. “

The center will offer karaoke nights, arts, crafts and vocational training classes focused on business and entrepreneurship, which Nolen’s teenage daughters Moni and Tsumarri are familiar with. They run the “Hermosa Sisters” candle store next door in addition to tackling their schoolwork.

“It’s always good to learn something new,” said Moni.

She and her sister plan to teach the children at the center. Moni will offer classes in candle making and Tsumarri will teach cooking.

“Kids really need this stuff, especially mentors,” Moni said.

It seems they need it more than ever. The past few days have been particularly violent in Memphis, with several teenagers arrested for serious crimes including a fatal shooting at a Ridgeway shopping center. Police said two teenagers shot and killed another teenager as he took out the trash from his fast food job.

“I heard a mother cry when her child didn’t come home,” Nolen said. “It’s a scream you don’t want to hear.”

She hopes that the new youth center will make these cries less frequent. The grand opening at 3511 chemin Ramill is Saturday from 2 p.m. to 6 p.m.


Source link

]]>
https://villageunderforest.com/raleigh-family-hope-new-childrens-community-center-will-reduce-crime/feed/ 0