Village house – Village Under Forest http://villageunderforest.com/ Tue, 22 Nov 2022 14:31:06 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://villageunderforest.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-2021-06-25T171231.357-150x150.png Village house – Village Under Forest http://villageunderforest.com/ 32 32 Big Sale at the Grand Village – Mississippi’s Best Community Newspaper https://villageunderforest.com/big-sale-at-the-grand-village-mississippis-best-community-newspaper/ Tue, 22 Nov 2022 14:31:06 +0000 https://villageunderforest.com/big-sale-at-the-grand-village-mississippis-best-community-newspaper/ Big Sale at the Grand Village Posted at 8:28 a.m. on Tuesday, November 22, 2022 Kendall Wallace of Pearl River, a member of the Choctaw Tribe, dances during an inter-tribal dance during the 30th Annual Natchez Powwow at the Grand Natchez Indian Village. (File Photo | Democrat Natchez) NATCHEZ – On Saturday, December 3, the […]]]>

Big Sale at the Grand Village

Posted at 8:28 a.m. on Tuesday, November 22, 2022

NATCHEZ – On Saturday, December 3, the Natchez Indian Grand Village Museum Shop will host an open house and sale from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. All baskets will receive a 25% discount and all other merchandise will receive a 15% discount. . The sale will continue until Saturday, December 24.

“We are thrilled to host the Grand Sale at the Grand Village,” said Lance Harris, Manager of the Natchez Indian Grand Village. “This will create an opportunity for visitors to learn about Native American art at the site that has shaped so much of Mississippi history.”

Scarlett and John Darden will demonstrate Chitimacha river cane basket weaving techniques, and Tina Benevente will demonstrate pine needle basket weaving techniques. Demonstrations will take place from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Other activities include a kids’ take-out area focused on Native American-style arts and crafts. Refreshments will be served.

The Grand Village of the Natchez Indians was the primary ceremonial mound center of the Natchez people from 1682 to 1730. The 128-acre National Historic Site includes three mounds, a plaza, a nature trail, a museum, and a store. Administered by the Mississippi Department of Archives and History, the Grand Village is located at 400 Jefferson Davis Boulevard and is open free to the public from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday through Saturday and Sunday from 1:30 p.m. to 5 p.m. h.
For more information, email info@natchezgrandvillage.com or call 601-446-6502

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From Foxall to Foxhall: Exploring a Tudor Village in Northwest DC https://villageunderforest.com/from-foxall-to-foxhall-exploring-a-tudor-village-in-northwest-dc/ Sat, 19 Nov 2022 18:00:00 +0000 https://villageunderforest.com/from-foxall-to-foxhall-exploring-a-tudor-village-in-northwest-dc/ Comment this story Comment Answer Man admits there was a time when any mention of Foxhall Road reminded him of a colonial mansion he assumed must have once stood in the area. The road north of Georgetown surely takes its name from Fox Hall, which in turn must have taken its name from the animals […]]]>

Comment

Answer Man admits there was a time when any mention of Foxhall Road reminded him of a colonial mansion he assumed must have once stood in the area. The road north of Georgetown surely takes its name from Fox Hall, which in turn must have taken its name from the animals that lived in the nearby woods.

Well, it turns out that Foxhall Road NW is named after a person. And his name wasn’t even Foxhall. It was foxall: Henry FoxallAmerica’s first major defense contractor.

Foxall (1758-1823) was an Englishman who immigrated to Pennsylvania and began making farm implements at his foundry in Philadelphia. After Thomas Jefferson asked him to open a foundry in Washington to manufacture weapons, one could say that Foxall went from plowshares to swords. In 1800 he moved to Washington, founding the Columbia Foundry. He was soon making around 100 guns a year.

The foundry was on the banks of the Potomac across from the Three Sisters Islands, an easy drive from Foxall’s Georgetown home and even easier from his summer home, Spring Hill Farm. This estate stood on land bounded today by P Street, 44th Street and Foxhall Road NW.

Foxall sold the foundry in 1815, the same year he financed the construction of a Methodist church at 14th and G Streets NW. He had become rich building tools to kill men, now he would endow a tool to save their souls. (The descendant of this church, Foundry United Methodist, is on 16th Street NW.)

Last week in this space, Answer Man explored Foxhall Crescents, an upscale 1980s housing estate designed by Arthur Cotton Moore who aped the Royal Crescent in Bath, England. Not far away is an older housing estate that is even more reminiscent of Blighty: Foxhall Village.

Visiting Foxhall Village is like stumbling across a quaint English town that magically materialized between Reservoir Road, Foxhall Road, Glover-Archbold Park and P Street NW. The only way it could be more English is if a series of murder mystery had caught the attention of an amateur sleuth who uses his disarming skills to reveal the culprit.

The first advertisement in The Washington Post for Foxhall Village appeared on October 4, 1925. Even allowing for the hyperbole of the time, it came across quite strongly: “Never before in the history of the nation’s capital have houses like this one was offered to the people of Washington! It’s a literal fact!

Developers Harry K. Boss and H. Glenn Phelps had purchased land that was part of Spring Hill Farm from Foxall. Boss had apparently fallen in love with English townhouse design while on a trip to England, a trip that included a visit to the aforementioned Royal Crescent in Bath.

The company has hired the district architect James Cooper to design 190 townhouses in the Tudor Revival style. It’s a look instantly recognizable by its half-timbering: dark wooden beams set against a pale stucco background. Cooper’s designs also included slate roofs, decorative herringbone brickwork, double-hung wooden sash windows, and chimneys topped with decorative clay pots. (As with other exclusive developments in Ward 3 at the time, race pacts prohibited the sale of homes to African Americans and Jews.)

Foxhall Road was once known as Ridge Road, for its position along the heights overlooking the Potomac. It was also sometimes rendered on maps as “Foxall” Road. Boss and Phelps chose the spelling “Foxhall” for their village. When another developer, William Waverly Taylor, built 106 townhouses on land south of the Boss and Phelps neighborhood in 1928, he dubbed the development Foxall Village. It also featured Tudor Revival style houses.

Six more houses were built five years later by a third developer, Cooper Lightbown and Son. These too were of Olde English-y design. In 2007, the entire neighborhood – some 310 buildings – was designated a Foxhall Village Historic District.

When The Post wrote about Foxhall Village, it complimented the way the dwellings were laid out, with some houses further away, others further back – stepped backs, in the parlance of architects. This created “pleasant individuality” while “preserving the harmony of each group”.

Thus, within a mile of each other, we can see two architects choosing two different approaches: at Foxhall Crescent, Moore attempted to make separate houses appear joined, while at Foxhall Village , Cooper attempted to make connected homes seem separate.

Paul and Charlotte Don Vito moved to Foxhall Village in 2002. Charlotte is English. Does the neighborhood remind her of where she grew up?

“Yes,” Paul said. “But, if anything, this is a more perfect England than where she came from. It’s definitely an idealized version of Britain.

It’s the season of thanks. (As Boss and Phelps might have said: It’s a literal fact!) It’s also the season for giving to those less fortunate.

The Washington Post Helping Hand raises money for three district charities working to end homelessness and hunger: Miriam’s kitchen, bread for the city and place of friendship. You can donate to any of them – or all of them! – by visiting posthelpinghand.com.

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History of the name of New Bedford; the first was Old Bedford Village https://villageunderforest.com/history-of-the-name-of-new-bedford-the-first-was-old-bedford-village/ Tue, 15 Nov 2022 18:35:18 +0000 https://villageunderforest.com/history-of-the-name-of-new-bedford-the-first-was-old-bedford-village/ NEW BEDFORD – This is New Bedford, not to be confused with Bedford, but it was Bedford, or rather Bedford Village. “Our place has long been known as the Village of Bedford,” wrote Daniel Ricketson in “The History of New Bedford, Mass.”, published by the author in 1858, “and to many even at the present […]]]>
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Veteran’s Village helps the homeless through the community https://villageunderforest.com/veterans-village-helps-the-homeless-through-the-community/ Fri, 11 Nov 2022 05:50:00 +0000 https://villageunderforest.com/veterans-village-helps-the-homeless-through-the-community/ BEND, Oregon — Washington Examiner visited the veterans village, where 15 small houses have been built to help homeless veterans get their lives back. The organizers were keen to lead with a sense of community. We spoke with a resident, John Steel, who said he had been homeless and isolated for 12 years. “Even before […]]]>

BEND, OregonWashington Examiner visited the veterans village, where 15 small houses have been built to help homeless veterans get their lives back. The organizers were keen to lead with a sense of community.

We spoke with a resident, John Steel, who said he had been homeless and isolated for 12 years. “Even before I became homeless, I was a recluse.” Now Steel cracks jokes with reporters and is more than confident speaking on camera. He attributes this to his seven months at the Veterans’ Village. “My interactions with people just sucked. So it forces me to develop my social skills.

The community of Bend, Oregon came together to help complete the construction of these cabins to house the homeless in the Veterans Village.

Amy DeLaura / Washington Examiner

Veterans Village coordinator David Nieradka, who is a retired veteran himself, said they had a community hall with an industrial kitchen, refrigerator, stoves and dishwashers, as well as showers and washing machines. It is also the only place where residents can access television and the Internet. They don’t allow TVs or WiFi in the cabins, specifically to encourage residents to come into the community room and socialize.

“We want them to socialize, to reintegrate with others because a lot of our guys have been isolated for years,” Nieradka said. “That socialization and integration, with all of our veterans here, fosters that sense of community, of camaraderie that we once had in the military. It works really well for us.

Veterans Village Community Hall.png

The Veterans Village in Bend, Oregon has a community hall to help residents socialize.

Amy DeLaura / Washington Examiner

HOW CRIME AND HOMELESSNESS ALMOST TURNED OREGON RED FOR THE FIRST TIME IN DECADES

Cheri Helt helped advance the construction of this 15-house neighborhood through legislation. This whole project started before COVID when Helt was in the state legislature. She passed bills to relax building codes to ensure the project could go ahead.

His department worked with the city council to allocate funds to departments and the county. The county ended up donating the land to the Veterans’ Village.

“This project was really about working together as a community and putting our energy into solutions to solving homelessness,” Helt said.

HOW A THIRD-PARTY CANDIDATE IS BLURRING THE RACE FOR NEXT OREGON GOVERNOR

When COVID hit, the project almost came to a halt. “When we were building these houses, the problem we faced was the shortage of labour. We didn’t have skilled carpenters we could hire to build them,” Helt said. “We reached out to the community and asked for all kinds of volunteers to come and help us. Everyone learned how to use power tools, paint and side, and it was a really amazing project.

Helt was inspired by all the young people who came to volunteer with school programs and organizations. She even got the whole family involved, as her father and husband learned how to siding these houses. All of the inspirational wall art and furnishings were donated by Oregon businesses and community members.

“We did it as a community. No one could have done it alone,” Helt said.

Veterans Village.png

The Veterans Village in Bend, Oregon has 15 homes to try to help homeless veterans reintegrate into a community.

Amy DeLaura / Washington Examiner

Steel sat in the kitchen of the community hall and told us how he was chosen to be accepted into this program. “The services they provide are excellent. Now in my case, because of my age and retirement, my standards are totally different. I am here to have all my medical issues taken care of, which has been a plus so far.

Steel revealed that he had to have a few toes amputated and his hands were stuck in a curled up position. He is able to get proper medical attention with the help of the Veterans Village. He used to make knives and can now get back to doing something he loves that might even help him make some money. Steel told us that saving money is a plus on the program, and he dreams of taking a road trip on his motorcycle once he’s finished his time at Veterans Village.

WATCH: PORTLAND VOTERS RING UP ON HOMELESSNESS

“Right now we have 12 residents on site,” Nieradka said. “We had a total of seven residents who either moved into their own accommodation or decided it might not be right for them at this point in their life. There’s no bad blood with people leaving. Five of the seven were successes in employment, housing, really got them back on their feet.

For more information, visit the Veterans Village website here.

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Welsh-speaking village ‘doesn’t want to be another Abersoch’ as ​​half a million book houses are thrown out https://villageunderforest.com/welsh-speaking-village-doesnt-want-to-be-another-abersoch-as-half-a-million-book-houses-are-thrown-out/ Tue, 08 Nov 2022 22:18:50 +0000 https://villageunderforest.com/welsh-speaking-village-doesnt-want-to-be-another-abersoch-as-half-a-million-book-houses-are-thrown-out/ //= do_shortcode(‘[in-content-square]’) ?> The Proposed Morfa Nefyn Housing Site (Cyngor Gwynedd – Planning Application Images) Dale Spridgeon, local democracy journalist Plans to build ‘half a million pound houses’ in a seaside village in Llŷn have again been rejected amid calls to stop it ‘becoming another Abersoch’. The Cyngor Gwynedd planning committee has rejected a request […]]]>
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The Proposed Morfa Nefyn Housing Site (Cyngor Gwynedd – Planning Application Images)

Dale Spridgeon, local democracy journalist

Plans to build ‘half a million pound houses’ in a seaside village in Llŷn have again been rejected amid calls to stop it ‘becoming another Abersoch’.

The Cyngor Gwynedd planning committee has rejected a request to ‘erect seven dwellings and associated works’ in the former Eglwys Santes Mair in Morfa Nefyn.

The plans have been submitted by Commercial Development Projects Ltd through agent Sioned Edwards of Cadnant Planning. The scheme, at the Lôn yr Eglwys site, would see two three-bedroom houses awarded as ‘affordable’ and five free market dwellings, mostly three-bedroom and one four-bedroom.

The plans were an updated version of a previous proposal turned down last year.

In 2021, town planning inspectors upheld Cyngor Gwynedd’s decision to refuse plans for six free market houses on the site – citing the development’s possible impact on the Welsh language.

The plans had followed Gwynedd’s 2019 approval of the demolition of the Church of the Resurrection of Our Savior in Morfa Nefyn, after it fell victim to a sweeping closure program announced by the Bishop of Wrexham three years earlier.

Concerns were raised that the houses were “out of reach of local people“, there was tight access, traffic problems and a potential impact on residents and users of Lôn yr Eglwys and Ysgol Morfa Nefyn .

The amended plans were again reviewed by the Cyngor Gwynedd planning committee yesterday (Monday 7 November).

Planning officer Aneurin Rhys Roberts described the application as saying it was on a brownfield site within the boundaries of the development.

Access was offered from an existing private road leading from Lôn Yr Eglwys, past the primary school.

The main considerations were whether the new plans met local housing needs and would support and promote the Welsh language.

However, Mr Rhys Roberts said the five free market units would add to an ‘oversupply of housing in the village’.

Although the Strategic Housing Unit confirmed that there was a local need for houses of the proposed scale.

But, Mr Rhys Roberts said: ‘There is no certainty that it will be local families who will occupy the houses.

Homes ‘were likely’ to sell for higher than local prices, based on average neighborhood income

‘The Welsh language unit also thought they would be out of reach for most locals to buy,’ he said.

It concluded that the accommodation did not meet the requirements of local housing policy and would “likely have a detrimental impact” on the Welsh language, and recommended rejection.

Plans of some of the houses planned for the Morfa Nefyn site (Cygor Gwynedd town planning documents.)

Constable Sioned Edwards spoke for three minutes saying it was ‘not viable’ for the claimant to provide 100 per cent affordable housing but they had provided 30 per cent more.

The applicant was also “committed” to a local marketing strategy and the units would not be marketed nationally until the local population received the first refusal.

She said there was strong local demand for this size and type of home from families in the area.

The local member, Councilor Gareth Tudor Jones, then spoke for ten minutes.

He described the site as “a small parcel of land, less than an acre, not suitable as a location for seven large houses, with driveways and parking.

“There is no suitable access, no way to widen access, it is impossible for two cars to pass, let alone an ambulance or a fire truck.”

He also pointed to the busy road, close to Lôn Eglwys – Church Road, where cars are parked on either side, adding that there was a “real risk to the safety of parents and pupils”, if the site was developed and had concerns on two trails in the area.

He added there was an “amenity impact” for locals, as the proposed homes would overlook gardens and rear lounges.

“If there ever was excessive development, this is it, there is no demand for five of the houses,” he said.

“The agent said there was ‘high local demand’ but not for the prices quoted, at maybe half a million at a time. I speak on behalf of the people of Morfa Nefyn, no one can relate. pay them.

‘It was also ‘against’ policy as only affordable housing was allowed. Many villagers are against the plans, no one wants to see Morfa Nefyn turn into another Abersoch – a place where houses are empty for half the year.

“People are struggling financially, there are at least 15 houses for sale in the village beyond the reach of anyone local. This would certainly cause significant harm to the local community and to the Welsh language.

“The initial request was refused – and it was refused on appeal. This one is more or less the same, just an extra house has been turned into affordable housing.

‘Inappropriate’

Councilor Gruff Williams offered to follow the officer’s recommendation to deny the request, and Councilor Huw Wyn Jones was “more than happy” to second,

Cllr Wyn Jones added “I remember this was submitted to us a few years ago.” he said. “I remember thinking how completely unsuitable the roads were. What are people going to do to drag their trash cans down the road? »

Cllr Gareth Coj Parry added that the scheme makes no sense, “if garbage vehicles and fire trucks can’t get through”.

A brief discussion ensued on the adopted road statute and policy aspects. A vote to accept the officers’ recommendation to deny the request was then passed unanimously.


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Chief Janasena Pawan Kalyan Visits Ippatam Village | Pawan Fire on the government | About the demolition of houses (video) https://villageunderforest.com/chief-janasena-pawan-kalyan-visits-ippatam-village-pawan-fire-on-the-government-about-the-demolition-of-houses-video/ Sat, 05 Nov 2022 06:59:50 +0000 https://villageunderforest.com/chief-janasena-pawan-kalyan-visits-ippatam-village-pawan-fire-on-the-government-about-the-demolition-of-houses-video/ House ” Policy ” Chief Janasena Pawan Kalyan Visits Ippatam Village | Pawan Fire on the government | About the demolition of houses (video) Posted By: XYZ Social News November 5, 2022 ... . . ... . ... . ... . ... . ... . . #etvandhrapradesh#recent news#newsoftheday #etvnews Download the ETV Win app to […]]]>

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Chief Janasena Pawan Kalyan Visits Ippatam Village |  Pawan Fire on the government |  About the demolition of houses (video)

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5 events in Oakland this week https://villageunderforest.com/5-events-in-oakland-this-week/ Tue, 01 Nov 2022 21:46:34 +0000 https://villageunderforest.com/5-events-in-oakland-this-week/ Sign up for The Oaklandside’s free daily newsletter. Your support feeds our press room! Thank you for supporting The Oaklandside and being part of our community. A donation to The Oaklandside goes beyond the newsroom. We amplify community voices, share the power of real information, and study systems, not just symptoms. Fall officially arrived about […]]]>

Fall officially arrived about a month ago, but it wasn’t really until Tuesday’s downpour. This weekend the forecast calls for more rain starting on Saturday and continuing through next week. If you’re planning on attending any of the outdoor events we’re offering this week, be sure to check for any postponements or cancellations first.

If you have an event you’d like me to consider for this roundup, email me at azucena@oaklandside.org. If there is an event you would like to promote on our calendar, you can use the self-submission form at any time by clicking on the “Events” tab on our homepage.

Que Vivan los Muertos: Community Procession and EastSide Arts Festival

A scene from the Day of the Dead festival on Fruitvale. Credit: Emma Garcia

EatSide Arts Alliance and Cultural Center in the San Antonio Park neighborhood is hosting a series of events to commemorate Day of the Dead. The first will take place on Wednesday, November 2, with a community procession in honor of the ancestors, followed by a meal and live music. Wednesday’s event will also kick off a series of community art festivals with live music from different artists, taking place over the next two weekends. The events are all presented by EastSide Arts Alliance and NAKA Dance Theatre.

Wednesday, November 2, 4-8 p.m., free, EastSide parking lot, 2310 E. 12th St.

“Drinking and Dragons” at The New Parkway

The New Parkway Theater offers free socials every night on its mezzanine, including bingo, art, karaoke, and trivia. The latest addition is “Drinking and Dragons, which takes place on Wednesdays. Visitors can enjoy a beer while playing Dungeons and Dragons, a fantasy tabletop role-playing game in which players develop characters and are led on a quest or series of adventures by another player known as Dungeon Master.

Every Wednesday, at 7:30 p.m., free admission, The New Parkway Theatre, 474 24th St.

Book launch: It takes a village: small houses, big voices

Some 1,400 volunteers have worked on the small village of houses over the past few years, according to Youth Spirit Artworks. Credit: Pete Rosos

In August 2020, Youth Spirit Artworks, a Berkeley-based arts and career training program for homeless and low-income youth, created the Tiny House Empowerment Village, a transitional housing program for older homeless young adults. 18 to 25 years old located near the Oakland Coliseum. The accommodation opened in February 2021, and that summer local artist Zoe Mosko began hosting a writing group with residents, believing that everyone has a story to tell and that sharing them could still forge a sense of community. Now the group’s writings are published in a volume titled, It takes a village: small houses, big voices. This Friday, the group will celebrate with a book launch party. Attendees will have the chance to purchase the book and have it signed by the authors, listen to music, enjoy food, and participate in community giveaways.

Friday, Nov. 4, 5 p.m. to 8 p.m., free to attend633 Hegenberger Road

Whiplash interactive exhibit at OSA

Each fall, students in the Production Design program at the Oakland School for the Arts create an interactive public exhibit. This year, the exhibit is inspired by the creations of Meow Wolf, a Santa Fe, NM-based arts and entertainment company specializing in immersive and interactive storytelling installations. Whiplash is a thought-provoking exhibit that invites viewers to explore human emotion in an interactive environment. The exhibition consists of eight rooms that the students built in the school’s Black Box Theater.

Thursday, Nov. 3 through Saturday, Nov. 5, 5-8 p.m., tickets available at the door, under 18s $5, adults $8, Oakland School for the Arts Black Box Theatre, 530 19th St.

Park name changed in honor of Wilma Chan

Vigil for victims of the Atlanta spa shootings hosted by Oakland Rising at Madison Park in Chinatown. Credit: Amir Aziz

Community members will commemorate the one-year anniversary of the death of Alameda County Supervisor Wilma Chan by renaming Madison Park in downtown Oakland in her honor. The site’s renaming to Wilma Chan Park also coincides with the start of major park improvements such as new signage, lighting, and playground upgrades. The name change ceremony will honor Chan’s legacy and contributions to Oakland and the AAPI communities of East Bay.

Friday, Nov. 4, 12 p.m. to 1:30 p.m., free to attendWilma Chan Park, formerly Madison Park, 810 Jackson St.

]]> Many villagers are unaware of the new law that includes Medicare benefits https://villageunderforest.com/many-villagers-are-unaware-of-the-new-law-that-includes-medicare-benefits/ Sat, 29 Oct 2022 21:30:31 +0000 https://villageunderforest.com/many-villagers-are-unaware-of-the-new-law-that-includes-medicare-benefits/ According to Jim Bodenner, president of the Villages chapter of the National Retiree Legislative Network (NRLN), many residents of The Villages are unaware that a new law includes Medicare and other health care benefits. The NRLN Villages Chapter was established in September 2016. The NRLN is based in Washington, DC and is a national, nonpartisan, […]]]>

According to Jim Bodenner, president of the Villages chapter of the National Retiree Legislative Network (NRLN), many residents of The Villages are unaware that a new law includes Medicare and other health care benefits.

The NRLN Villages Chapter was established in September 2016. The NRLN is based in Washington, DC and is a national, nonpartisan, nonprofit organization dedicated to representing the interests of retirees and future retirees.

Bodenner said he was recently invited by a law firm in The Villages to talk to their clients about Medicare and other health insurance coverage. “There were people in the audience who were surprised to learn from me that starting in 2023, Medicare will cap the cost of insulin at $35 per month. Everyone was thrilled to learn that starting in 2025, the amount of out-of-pocket expenses Medicare Part D beneficiaries will have to pay annually for their prescriptions will be capped at $2,000.

He said the U.S. Senate and House cut short their usual month-long hiatus in August to pass legislation providing improvements to Medicare and other health care benefits. The Senate passed the bill on August 7 and the House passed it on August 12. President Biden signed the law into law during a ceremony at the White House on August 16.

Bodenner noted the additional benefits provided by law as well as $35 per month for insulin and the $2,000 annual cap for prescription drugs:

  • As of January 1, 2023, people enrolled in Medicare will have no out-of-pocket costs for vaccines recommended by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices for adults.
  • In 2024, the year before the out-of-pocket cap takes effect, Medicare beneficiaries will no longer have any out-of-pocket payments if they reach Medicare catastrophic coverage. The way catastrophic coverage works in 2022 is that once an enrollee’s out-of-pocket expenses reach $7,050, they pay 5% of their prescription drug costs, with no limit. In 2024, the 5% coinsurance requirement will be gone and enrollees will not have to pay anything for their prescription drugs for the rest of the year. Also from 2024 until 2029, Part D premiums cannot increase by more than 6% per year.
  • Starting in 2025, Medicare Part D plans will offer the “smoothed cost sharing” option. This means that Part D participants can choose to spread their disbursements over the year. This is designed to avoid being hit with a large drug bill at some point, which could discourage filling prescriptions.
  • In 2026, Medicare will begin to negotiate drug prices.

“Although the NRLN would have preferred legislation to require Medicare to use the (commercial) bidding model it proposed to members of Congress, it is historic that the new law will allow Medicare to eventually negotiate the price of some expensive prescription drugs. “, Bodenner said. “However, the NRLN and the Villages Chapter will continue to press for more drugs to be included in price negotiations.

Bodenner said he was available to speak to clubs in The Villages about Medicare. His email address [email protected]

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Artist Brandon Hardy created Sanderson Sisters puppets for the village Halloween parade https://villageunderforest.com/artist-brandon-hardy-created-sanderson-sisters-puppets-for-the-village-halloween-parade/ Wed, 26 Oct 2022 22:29:31 +0000 https://villageunderforest.com/artist-brandon-hardy-created-sanderson-sisters-puppets-for-the-village-halloween-parade/ Just a week before the Village Halloween Parade, New York artist, puppeteer and prop guy Brandon Hardy walked into our photo studio, obscured by a 20-pound puppet made of fabric, worbla thermoplastic and foam that looks like all the way to Sarah Jessica Parker in Hocus Pocus. The puppet was an almost life-size version of […]]]>

Just a week before the Village Halloween Parade, New York artist, puppeteer and prop guy Brandon Hardy walked into our photo studio, obscured by a 20-pound puppet made of fabric, worbla thermoplastic and foam that looks like all the way to Sarah Jessica Parker in Hocus Pocus. The puppet was an almost life-size version of Sarah Sanderson from the cult Disney film – she is one of four Hardy will bring to Monday’s parade.

Her hair contains the tiny braids she has in the film and her face, while completely nightmarish up close (those are the fake eyeballs for us), so closely resembles SJP it’s uncanny. She will join Winifred (Bette Midler’s character) and Mary (Kathy Najimy’s) as well as Billy Butcherson, Winifred’s presumed undead lover, whom Hardy will carry on his shoulders all night. The witches will have their own puppeteers to carry them through the horde of paraders.

RECOMMENDED: Behind the Screams: A Glimpse of the Village Halloween Parade

If that sounds like a (literally) heavy lift from Hardy, it is. The artist assembles his puppets like a mad scientist in his garage over the months, before the parade, so that other New Yorkers can “oo” and “ahh” in front of his gargantuan creations. It’s about creating its own magic to inspire and create memories for those who see its work and its creators like Hardy who make the Halloween Parade Village what it is and has been for almost 50 years.

“It’s both a cultural institution and an air vent for the spirit,” Hardy says of the parade. “Each type of person shows up and brings their own gorgeous mess to share with everyone. The parade takes so many of our most basic human instincts and gives them space to breathe – to come together, to do things, to celebrate, to share, to transform, to play, to witness… it’s music, dance , art, sculpture, theater, processions, rituals and it is also rebellion, claim, protest, all these things at the same time. And it is accessible to everyone to see or be, according to our preference, in one of the main arteries of New York.

Hardy has been creating puppets for the parade for 13 years now (the macabre number is not lost on him) and really got into it when he saw he could lean into his love of puppets for one of her favorite vacation. The fact that it was a parade for the people is what sealed it for him.

Photography: Courtesy of Brandon Hardy

“When I got there, I realized what a real community building event it was,” he recalls. “It’s an annual opportunity to come together and do something huge as a collective, which is so important in a city like New York. To affirm community with everyone and revel in it.”

When he’s not working on puppets, paintings, sculptures, props and sets for other projects, often for television, Broadway and the stage, he works hard to create his own passion projects for the parade. More recently, he recorded TikToks and video tutorials. In fact, he just launched a chilling web series called “Out of the Ether with Brandon Hardy.”

It’s safe to say that the video series is the next step or extension of his passion, which started at a very young age.

“I grew up looking at things like The Muppets, Pinocchio and The Nightmare Before Christmas, which kind of turned my gaze to the puppets,” he says. “From there, I looked at things that took the art form even further and in weirder directions. I was the kid who turned the garage into a haunted house every Halloween, and I never got out of it. I’m still doing stuff in the garage, but things have extended way beyond that as well.

One of his favorite early costumes was a puppet that looked like he was riding on the back of a giant penguin. Its feet were actually the penguin’s feet, and false legs straddled the bird. “That was the year my parents decided I was old enough to be given a hot glue gun, so I swung hard. I got some weird looks on Halloween, but I think that this encouraged me more than it discouraged me.

You may remember his A Nightmare Before Christmas puppets from a previous village Halloween parade. He often turned to spooky properties for inspiration…Hocus Pocus and The haunted mansion to Disneyland in particular – and, of course, to other artists.

“Seeing what other artists create makes me want to push to reach their level, but also to accompany them in the realization of their own works”, he explains. “It leads to this big recursive effect where everyone grows from everyone’s growth.”

That’s part of why the Village Halloween Parade is so important to Hardy and other entertainers like him. It’s an excuse to show off their own work but also revel in the incredible talent of others.

“No one represents the village Halloween parade, it’s a cumulative effort,” he says. “It comes from people working both together and apart to weave a grand, perfectly imperfect tapestry.”

Before heading out for an evening of treats and tips, meet the artists behind the parade for yourself here.

The Nightmare Before Christmas by Brandon Hardy at the Village Halloween Parade
Photography: Courtesy of Brandon Hardy

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This former estate house in a popular village offers opportunities https://villageunderforest.com/this-former-estate-house-in-a-popular-village-offers-opportunities/ Tue, 18 Oct 2022 14:32:59 +0000 https://villageunderforest.com/this-former-estate-house-in-a-popular-village-offers-opportunities/ Formerly part of the Womersley Hall estate, this large detached property with two driveways has a south-facing courtyard and lawned garden, with a barn and converted stable. It also has a double garage and plenty of private parking spaces. The Old Estate House is the former home of a Yorkshire architect and his artist wife, […]]]>

Formerly part of the Womersley Hall estate, this large detached property with two driveways has a south-facing courtyard and lawned garden, with a barn and converted stable.

It also has a double garage and plenty of private parking spaces.

The Old Estate House is the former home of a Yorkshire architect and his artist wife, and offers its new owner the opportunity to renovate its many rooms and put their own stamp on them.

The garage and the old stable are attached to the south wing of the house and could possibly be transformed into independent accommodation.

Inside, the house is spacious with four reception rooms, two offices – ideal for anyone working from home, five bedrooms and three bathrooms, plus an attic room.

Its space is versatile and could be used to include rooms such as a playroom, game room or home gym if desired.

There is a large, well-lit kitchen with a range of fitted units, and fireplaces are the focal points in the beamed reception rooms. Some rooms also have exposed beams on the ceiling. Womersley has a Grade I listed church and Park Lane, where The Estate House is located, is widely regarded as the best street in the village.

It is convenient for the northern motorway network and therefore a good choice for anyone wishing to travel to York, Leeds or Doncaster.

The Old Estate House, Park Lane, Womersley, is for sale from estate agents Blenkin and Co., asking price £550,000.

Call the agents on 01904 671672 to request further information.

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