Village house – Village Under Forest http://villageunderforest.com/ Just another WordPress site Tue, 21 Sep 2021 20:42:06 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://villageunderforest.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-2021-06-25T171231.357-150x150.png Village house – Village Under Forest http://villageunderforest.com/ 32 32 Grover Cleveland’s grandson visits Fayetteville – eagle news online https://villageunderforest.com/grover-clevelands-grandson-visits-fayetteville-eagle-news-online/ https://villageunderforest.com/grover-clevelands-grandson-visits-fayetteville-eagle-news-online/#respond Tue, 21 Sep 2021 20:42:06 +0000 https://villageunderforest.com/grover-clevelands-grandson-visits-fayetteville-eagle-news-online/ VILLAGE OF FAYETTEVILLE – George Cleveland made an early stopover in Fayetteville on September 18 to take a peek into the village once called home by his grandfather, who happens to be the only man to have been elected to two non-consecutive terms in the presidency of the United States. Since the lives of George […]]]>

VILLAGE OF FAYETTEVILLE – George Cleveland made an early stopover in Fayetteville on September 18 to take a peek into the village once called home by his grandfather, who happens to be the only man to have been elected to two non-consecutive terms in the presidency of the United States.

Since the lives of George and Grover Cleveland were decades away from each other on this earth, the equally mustached descendant did not spend his early years playing on the South Lawn of the White House as some might even think. if he still felt the connection when he visited his grandfather’s house. childhood residence at 109 Academy Street on Saturday, often finding himself running with his fingertips along the walls of the hallways and rooms Grover walked through.

“I believe in vibrational history a lot,” said George. “When you stand where something happened, if it concerns you personally or if it’s an event of great historical significance, it’s always fun. “

In the first year of his life, Fayetteville Mayor Mark Olson lived in the same house as one of eight children. It is now owned by Nancy Needham, who moved in as she searched for a place to retire in the mid-1990s.

Stephen Grover Cleveland was born in New Jersey in 1837, but lived in Fayetteville from 1841 to 1850 before his family moved to Clinton. Part of his later teenage years saw him return to the village to work as a clerk at the McViccar dry goods store, which was located in what is now Limestone Plaza.

He eventually went on to become Erie County Sheriff, Mayor of Buffalo, and Governor of New York before becoming 22nd and 24th All-in-One President, but even in preparation for this rise in politics, his grand- son said that many writings have named Fayetteville as the source of some of man’s fondest memories.

At 70, the current Tamworth, New Hampshire resident has grown accustomed to anyone’s surprise that there is only one family generation between him and Grover Cleveland, his succinct recorded response giving the explanation of coitus and mathematics.

In 1886, a year and a half after his first term as president, Grover married Frances Folsom, 21, who was 25 years his junior. In 1897 the two had Richard, whose second wife Jessie Maxwell Black gave birth to George in 1952.

During his visit, the guest of honor of the village benefited from a full tour of the Free Library of Fayetteville. Staff had their grandfather’s wooden bobsleigh in addition to a Grover Cleveland Day program, held on the 100th anniversary of his presidential visit to the village in 1887.

Later that day, George sat down for an open interview at the back of the library with Larry Cook, a locally born presidential historian who he met at the Missouri Cherry Blossom Festival.

Cook said the more he learned about Grover Cleveland, the more he realized that his personal side revealed a “treasure trove” of information.

“His life could be turned into a novel or a movie,” Cook said. “It contains all the politics and romance and a bit of scandal and medical drama.”

Throughout the 45-minute interview, Cook and the President’s living likeness discussed the covert operation on a malignant tumor in Grover’s mouth, his alleged irregularity involving an illegitimate child, and the fact that he was single by the time he entered the Oval Office.

It was agreed, however, that Grover was an avid fisherman and hunter who remained honest, grounded in his faith, and ultimately unwilling to take advantage of the post-presidential civil service.

The couple also alluded to Grover’s sister Rose, who served as interim first lady early in her first administration, as well as her daughter Ruth, who is believed to have inspired the candy bar name Baby Ruth. .

George said he has traveled all of New York City, especially its western part, but this past weekend marked his introductory trip to his grandfather’s first home in the state.

“I see why he loved his Fayetteville years so much,” said George. “No doubt about it. “

Known for his collection of 8,000 pieces of President-related memorabilia, Larry Cook is the author of the books Presidential coincidences, amazing facts and collectibles and Symbols of Patriotism: First Ladies and Daughters of the American Revolution.

Along with his work as a radio station’s news director and voice actor, George Cleveland engaged in large-scale reenactments of his grandfather’s wedding and second inauguration, experiences which he considers a form of time travel in the late 1800s. In the process, he uses a physical impression of Grover that involves dropping his voice and stuffing a pillow under his shirt to mimic a slight weight gain, all dressed from head to toe in appropriate clothing at the time.


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The Unique Benefits of Living in a Historic Scituate House https://villageunderforest.com/the-unique-benefits-of-living-in-a-historic-scituate-house/ https://villageunderforest.com/the-unique-benefits-of-living-in-a-historic-scituate-house/#respond Tue, 21 Sep 2021 09:30:23 +0000 https://villageunderforest.com/the-unique-benefits-of-living-in-a-historic-scituate-house/ Jill West first entered Bates House in October 2018 after being accepted as a tenant by the Scituate Historical Society, which oversees the historic property located at 6 Jericho Road. “From that moment, upon entering the house, I knew I was home,” West said. She moved into the house, which is owned by the city, […]]]>

Jill West first entered Bates House in October 2018 after being accepted as a tenant by the Scituate Historical Society, which oversees the historic property located at 6 Jericho Road.

“From that moment, upon entering the house, I knew I was home,” West said.

Jill West stands outside Bates House which dates from 1650 and where she now resides on Wednesday September 15, 2021.

She moved into the house, which is owned by the city, in February 2019. As the house keeper, she organizes guided tours and shares the illustrious history of the house with visitors.

A US Army of two

Rebecca and Abigail Bates were two of the nine children of Simeon and Rachel Bates.

In 1811, Simeon Bates, a veteran of the War of Independence, was appointed lighthouse keeper of the new Scituate lighthouse. One evening in September 1814, while their parents and siblings were away, Rebecca, 21, and Abigail, 17, noticed a British warship anchored in the harbor and British soldiers – in red tunics – rowing towards the shore.

During Heritage Days this year, Jill West's granddaughter, Gianna Fallon DeMasi, and great-niece Harmony Alexandra Sullivan, disguised as Rebecca and Abigail Bates, welcomed visitors to the Bates House.

It is said that Rebecca knew she could kill one or two of the soldiers with a musket, but knew that this would result in retaliation on the village. Instead, she told her sister to take the drum and that she would grab her fife.

As the story unfolded, the sisters hid in a dense stand of cedar trees where they continued to play their instruments louder and louder, hoping the British would believe an American militia was gathering to meet them.

Jill West is in the original part of the house which dates back to 1650 and shows the Beehive oven next to the Bates House fireplace on Wednesday, September 15, 2021.

Their plan worked and the British withdrew, and the sisters became known as the “American Army of Two”.

The fife played by Rebecca is on display in the Scituate Light Guardian’s House.

The circle is complete

West, who was born in Hawaii, has spent most of her life in Scituate. Its connection with the city goes back a long way. Her great-great-great-grandfather, Daniel Ward, brought the foam industry to Scituate in the mid-1800s, she said.

She also has a connection to the Bates House.

The Bates House dates back to 1650 and was the home of the Bates sisters who helped foil a British attack during the War of 1812.

“My grandmother and the mother of Yvonne Twomey, whose grandfather bought the Bates house in 1907, were cousins,” she says. “I had Yvonne as an English teacher in eighth grade. My dad taught with her in the early 1960s. She, my mom, and my aunts got together for their “Cousins ​​Lunch” every year for many years. I would have liked to know her better.

Twomey had lived in the Bates house for years and before her death in September 2018 at the age of 93, she had arranged for the city to purchase the house in order to protect the site from development.

After graduating from Scituate High School in 1976 and going to college, West enlisted in the United States Navy and lived a decade of active service during the Gulf War. She ended up in Marin County, California, where she raised her daughter, Kate.

She returned to Scituate in 2003.

The Beehive Oven can be found next to the fireplace in the original section of the Bates House on Wednesday, September 15, 2021.

After retiring as Business Director of the Scituate Harbourmaster, West began volunteering for the Scituate Historical Society.

“It was here that my knowledge and interest in the history of the town and of Bates House flourished.”

When she learned that Twomey had sold the Bates house to the town, the idea of ​​living in the house as a caretaker came into being.

Living in the shadow of history

While West has said that she loves everything about the house, there are some aspects that she cherishes more than others.

“I love the attic,” she says. “There are two rooms in the attic – a small one that was Yvonne’s bedroom when she visited her grandparents in the summer when she was little. We found her diary from 1932, she would have been eight, writing about seeing an eclipse at her grandmother’s house in Scituate.

A photo of Rebecca Bates is on display at the Bates House on Wednesday, September 15, 2021.

From the attic there is a clear view of the lighthouse.

“I think of all the people who must have had the same point of view over the centuries.”

A certain floorboard in one of the original rooms of the house is particularly poignant to West.

“I measured it at over 19 inches in width,” she said.

Sunflowers rest on a table in one of the oldest additions to the Bates House on Wednesday, September 15, 2021.

This matters because at the time of construction of the house the King of England would have trees over 12 inches in diameter stamped with the Royal Seal indicating that they would be cut down and returned to England.

Jill West stands on one of her favorite parts of the Bates House because the 19 inch plank was a silent protest against the British as the wood over 12 inches would have been considered King's Wood and sent back to England all showing the Bates House on Wednesday, September 15, 2021.

“It was illegal for ‘commoners’ to use lumber this width,” West said. “I like the idea of ​​the first owner of the house, William Tichnor, chopping down a tree belonging to the king to build his house in 1650, more than a hundred years before our revolution.”

West enjoys sharing the home on open house tours and telling the story of the Bates sisters, especially to children.

“Some people just like to walk around the rooms and see the beams, the fireplaces and the structure.”

When asked if she sees ghosts, and has always been asked, West replied that her answer was a resounding “yes”.

Jill West shows the staircase to the attic bedrooms of the Bates House on Wednesday, September 15, 2021.

“I don’t really see any ghosts walking around. I feel like young Rebecca and Abigail lived here before 1811 with their nine siblings, looking across the harbor while the lighthouse was being built. I feel their honor and responsibility to continue this story for them now. “

She sometimes sits in the attic, she said, looking at the lighthouse.

“I feel those ghosts who are here with me are watching too. I feel the weight of honoring their past by sharing it with visitors in this unique place that I have the privilege to call home.

The Scituate Lighthouse can be seen from the attic rooms of the Bates House on Wednesday, September 15, 2021.

For more information on the Scituate Historical Society, visit sciciuatehistoricalsociety.org

Follow Ruth Thompson on Twitter @scituateruth



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Canary Islands volcano streams slow, houses destroyed, thousands flee https://villageunderforest.com/canary-islands-volcano-streams-slow-houses-destroyed-thousands-flee/ https://villageunderforest.com/canary-islands-volcano-streams-slow-houses-destroyed-thousands-flee/#respond Mon, 20 Sep 2021 21:31:00 +0000 https://villageunderforest.com/canary-islands-volcano-streams-slow-houses-destroyed-thousands-flee/ 5,500 people evacuated as lava flows towards the coast A hundred houses destroyed, no dead The island still open to tourism, according to the minister LA PALMA, Spain, Sept. 20 (Reuters) – Lava flowing from the first volcanic eruption in the Spanish Canary Islands in 50 years forced the evacuation of 5,500 people and destroyed […]]]>
  • 5,500 people evacuated as lava flows towards the coast
  • A hundred houses destroyed, no dead
  • The island still open to tourism, according to the minister

LA PALMA, Spain, Sept. 20 (Reuters) – Lava flowing from the first volcanic eruption in the Spanish Canary Islands in 50 years forced the evacuation of 5,500 people and destroyed around 100 homes, but the streams were advancing more slowly than expected, authorities said on Monday. .

The flow of molten rock will not reach the Atlantic Ocean on Monday evening, as was estimated earlier, an official said. Experts say if and when this happens, it could trigger more explosions and clouds of toxic gases.

“The movement of the lava is much slower than it was initially (…) There has not been much progress during the day,” said local emergency coordinator Miguel Angel Morcuende during a press briefing Monday evening. He said the stream made its way halfway to the coast.

A new lava flow erupted from the volcano late Monday, prompting the evacuation of residents of the city of El Paso, the regional emergency agency wrote on Twitter.

The volcano erupted for the first time on Sunday, hurling lava hundreds of meters into the air, engulfing forests and sending molten rock toward the ocean above a sparsely populated area of ​​La Palma , the most north-western island of the Canary Islands archipelago.

No deaths or injuries were reported, but drone footage captured two tongues of black lava cutting a devastating swath across the landscape as they moved up the volcano’s western flank towards the sea.

A Reuters witness saw the stream of molten rock make its way through a house in the village of Los Campitos, igniting the interior and sending flames through the windows and onto the roof.

Around 100 homes have been affected by the volcano eruption, said regional emergency manager Jorge Parra, adding that residents should not fear for their safety if they follow authorities’ recommendations.

Six roads on the island have been closed, officials said.

Regional Chief Angel Victor Torres said the damage would be substantial. “He is still active and will continue to be so over the next few days,” he added.

A house burns down from lava from a volcano eruption in Cumbre Vieja National Park in Los Llanos de Aridane, on the Canary Island of La Palma, on September 20, 2021. REUTERS / Borja Suarez

“It was horrible,” said Eva, a 53-year-old tourist from Austria. “We felt the earthquake, it started in the morning … Then at three in the afternoon the lady from our house came and said we had to pack everything up and leave quickly.”

“We’re happy to be going home now,” she said at the airport, boarding a return flight after cutting her trip short.

Tourism Minister Reyes Maroto said the eruption was “a wonderful sight” that would attract more tourists to the tourism-dependent archipelago – comments which have been criticized by the opposition at a time when many locals lost their home.

Some of the tourists at the airport disagreed with Maroto. “We want to leave as quickly as possible,” said Wienard, a 55-year-old social worker from Salzburg.

But at least one visitor was happy.

“I felt like a little kid inside, very excited,” said Kabirly, 26, a Belgian market researcher. “It was also my birthday yesterday so it was kind of a candle on the island cake!”

About 360 tourists were evacuated from a resort town in La Palma in the aftermath of the eruption and taken by boat to the neighboring island of Tenerife early on Monday, a spokesperson for ferry operator Fred Olsen said. In total, more than 500 tourists had to leave their hotels.

Anticipating reduced visibility, the maritime authorities on Monday closed navigation to the west of the island.

La Palma was on high alert after thousands of tremors were reported in a week in Cumbre Vieja, which belongs to a chain of volcanoes that experienced a major eruption in 1971 and is one of the most volcanic regions. most active in the Canaries.

Prime Minister Pedro Sanchez visited some affected areas and met with officials on Monday, then took to Twitter to welcome the response of emergency personnel.

The airspace around the Canaries remained open with no visibility issues, Enaire Civil Air Authority said after a local airline canceled four flights between the islands.

Reporting by Borja Suarez and Marco Trujillo in La Palma and Inti Landauro, Emma Pinedo, Corina Pons, Nathan Allen and Joan Faus in Madrid; Written by Ingrid Melander, Nathan Allen and Joan Faus; Editing by Angus MacSwan, Janet Lawrence and Giles Elgood

Our Standards: Thomson Reuters Trust Principles.


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Carolina Beach Road apartment complex opposed by neighbors https://villageunderforest.com/carolina-beach-road-apartment-complex-opposed-by-neighbors/ https://villageunderforest.com/carolina-beach-road-apartment-complex-opposed-by-neighbors/#respond Mon, 20 Sep 2021 10:10:45 +0000 https://villageunderforest.com/carolina-beach-road-apartment-complex-opposed-by-neighbors/ If Mark Calnon had known about plans to build a four-story apartment complex near the village of Motts Landing in southern New Hanover County, he and his wife would not have bought much in the development. Or at least they would have chosen another place to build their house. The couple are a month away […]]]>

If Mark Calnon had known about plans to build a four-story apartment complex near the village of Motts Landing in southern New Hanover County, he and his wife would not have bought much in the development.

Or at least they would have chosen another place to build their house.

The couple are a month away from moving into the house, which borders the nearly 22-acre site where developers are looking to build a new apartment complex.

Calnon, along with dozens of other residents of the village of Motts Landing, the nearby neighborhood of Sycamore Grove and other adjacent landowners, came on Thursday for a meeting with the developer.

Residents attend a community meeting Thursday to discuss an apartment complex project at the intersection of Carolina Beach Road and Jacob Mott Drive.  Residents of surrounding communities have expressed concerns about the impact the complex could have on existing stormwater circulation and runoff issues.

For some, however, the meeting raised more questions than it answered. Because the project is still in its early stages, details of the development’s impact on things like traffic and stormwater are still unknown, representatives told participants.

Unknowns regarding the project were brought to light as residents wondered how an apartment building would impact traffic congestion, water runoff, privacy, property values ​​and even crime rates. .


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Lava escapes from a volcano in La Palma, in the Canary Islands of Spain https://villageunderforest.com/lava-escapes-from-a-volcano-in-la-palma-in-the-canary-islands-of-spain/ https://villageunderforest.com/lava-escapes-from-a-volcano-in-la-palma-in-the-canary-islands-of-spain/#respond Sun, 19 Sep 2021 22:03:00 +0000 https://villageunderforest.com/lava-escapes-from-a-volcano-in-la-palma-in-the-canary-islands-of-spain/ Authorities evacuate invalids and farm animals in the region Mandatory evacuation ordered for four villages Spain’s prime minister delays UN trip and visits islands The last major eruption of the Cumbre Vieja volcanic range dates back to 1971 LA PALMA, Spain, September 19 (Reuters) – A volcano erupted on the Spanish Canary Island of La […]]]>
  • Authorities evacuate invalids and farm animals in the region
  • Mandatory evacuation ordered for four villages
  • Spain’s prime minister delays UN trip and visits islands
  • The last major eruption of the Cumbre Vieja volcanic range dates back to 1971

LA PALMA, Spain, September 19 (Reuters) – A volcano erupted on the Spanish Canary Island of La Palma on Sunday, sending lava into the air and flowing in rivers towards homes in two villages in Cumbre National Park Vieja, in the south of the island.

Authorities had started to evacuate the infirm and some farm animals from neighboring villages before the eruption at 3:15 p.m. (2:15 p.m. GMT) on a wooded slope in the sparsely populated Cabeza de Vaca region, according to the island government.

Two hours later, as lava poured down the hill from five torn cracks in the hill, the municipality ordered the evacuation of four villages, including El Paso and Los Llanos de Aridane.

After dark, video footage showed lava fountains projecting hundreds of feet into the sky, and at least three glowing orange rivers of molten rock spilling over the hill, tearing gashes in the woods and tearing them apart. agricultural land, and spreading as it reached the lower lands.

A stream, several hundred meters long and tens of meters wide, crossed a road and began to engulf scattered houses in El Paso. Video footage shared on social media, which Reuters could not verify, showed lava entering a house.

“When the volcano erupted today, I was scared. For journalists, it’s something spectacular, for us it’s a tragedy. I think the lava reached the homes of some relatives “Isabel Fuentes, 55, told Spanish television TVE.

“I was 5 when the volcano last erupted (in 1971). You never recover from a volcanic eruption,” added Fuentes, who said she had moved to another house on Sunday to his safety.

‘STAY IN YOUR HOUSES’

Canary Islands President Angel Victor Torres told a press conference on Sunday evening that 5,000 people had been evacuated and that no injuries had been reported so far.

Lava pours from a volcano in Cumbre Vieja National Park in El Paso, on the Canary Island of La Palma, on September 19, 2021, in this screenshot from a video. FORTA / Document via REUTERS

“It is not foreseeable that someone else will have to be evacuated. The lava is moving towards the coast and the damage will be material. According to experts, there would be around 17 to 20 million cubic meters of lava,” did he declare.

Flights to and from the Canaries were continuing normally, the airport operator Aena said.

Spanish Prime Minister Pedro Sanchez arrived in La Palma, the most northwestern island of the archipelago, on Sunday evening for talks with the government of the islands on the management of the eruption.

“We have all the resources (to deal with the eruption) and all the troops, the citizens can sleep easy,” he said.

Stavros Meletlidis, a doctor of volcanology at the Spanish Geographical Institute, said the eruption tore five holes in the hill and he could not know how long it would last.

“We have to measure the lava every day and that will help us determine it.”

King Felipe spoke with Torres and was following developments, the royal household said.

La Palma was on high alert after more than 22,000 tremors were reported in the space of a week in Cumbre Vieja, a chain of volcanoes that last experienced a major eruption in 1971 and is one of the most active volcanic regions of the Canaries.

In 1971, a man was killed while taking pictures near the lava flows, but no property was damaged.

The first recorded eruption in La Palma dates back to 1430, according to the Spanish National Geographical Institute (ING).

Reporting by Graham Keeley and Borja Suarez; Writing by Toby Chopra and Kevin Liffey; Editing by Gareth Jones, David Clarke, Edmund Blair and Diane Craft

Our Standards: Thomson Reuters Trust Principles.


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Desolate villages facing famine in Madagascar https://villageunderforest.com/desolate-villages-facing-famine-in-madagascar-2/ https://villageunderforest.com/desolate-villages-facing-famine-in-madagascar-2/#respond Sun, 19 Sep 2021 05:38:00 +0000 https://villageunderforest.com/desolate-villages-facing-famine-in-madagascar-2/ A general view of the houses of the village of Fenoaivo, Commune Ifotaka, August 30, 2021. – For several decades, the South-East of Madagascar has been a victim of the “Kere” phenomenon, as the local population calls it. Kere is the food crisis due to a period of intense drought that causes the cultivation of […]]]>

A general view of the houses of the village of Fenoaivo, Commune Ifotaka, August 30, 2021. – For several decades, the South-East of Madagascar has been a victim of the “Kere” phenomenon, as the local population calls it. Kere is the food crisis due to a period of intense drought that causes the cultivation of crops to stop abruptly by farmers for several months every year. Farmers find themselves without money and in a situation of “severe malnutrition” or even starvation. AFP

AMBOASARY, Madagascar – Nothing to eat, nothing to plant. The last rain in Ifotaka fell in May for two hours.

Across the vast southern tip of Madagascar, drought has turned fields into bowls of dust. Over a million people are facing famine.

On tens of thousands of hectares, the countryside is desolate. The harvest season begins in October, leaving long lean weeks before the arrival of the meager harvests.

Some villages are abandoned. In others, people should be working in the fields, but instead they languish at home. There is nothing to harvest.

Hunger weighs on people, both in the mind and in the body. They move slowly and find it difficult to follow the conversation.

“I feel sick and worried. Every day I wonder what we’re going to eat, ”says Helmine Sija, 60 years old and a mother of six, in a village called Atoby.

Eat cacti and weeds

A little woman with gray hair and a hardened face, Sija tends to a pot of boiling cactus in front of her house. She cut the bites with a machete to prepare them for cooking.

You can’t really call it food. The concoction has little nutritional value, but it is a popular appetite suppressant, even if it causes an upset stomach.

Her three oldest have left home to look for work in other cities. She takes care of the youngest.

“I want to move to a more fertile place, where I can cultivate. But I don’t have enough money to leave, ”she said.

Arzel Jonarson, 47, a former cassava farm worker, now collects firewood for sale, earning around 25 US cents per week. Enough to buy a bowl of rice.

In Ankilidoga, an elderly couple and their daughter prepare a meal of wild herbs, which they season with salt to reduce the bitterness. In better times, these were thrown away like weed. But their crops of corn, cassava and sweet potato failed.

Their village has a reservoir to collect rainwater. No one remembers the last time it was full.

“I haven’t received any help for two months,” said Kazy Zorotane, a 30-year-old single mother with four children. “The last time, in June, the government gave me money.

Around $ 26 (22 euros).

Climate crisis

Malnutrition regularly afflicts southern Madagascar. But the current drought is the worst in 40 years, according to the United Nations, which attributes the crisis to climate change.

Around the town of Ifotaka, people said the government had brought rice, beans and oil. But it was in August. Of the 500 people nominated for financial assistance, approximately 90 received the $ 26.

Doctors Without Borders dispatched a mobile clinic to move from village to village. Children cling to packets of “plump,” a peanut butter-flavored paste designed to help severely malnourished people.

Through the waiting crowd, nurses and orderlies spot the most urgent cases, guiding them to the front line. Small children are weighed in a blue bucket.

Measuring tapes are wrapped around their little arms, to give an indication of the extreme severity of their malnutrition.

In Befeno, another village, nine-year-old Zapedisoa came with his grandmother. He is lazy, his eyes seem empty. At 20 kilograms (44 pounds), he has alarming symptoms and is receiving medication and dietary supplements.

Satinompeo, a five-year-old with short hair, weighs only 11 kilos. She suffers from severe malnutrition, but she is afraid of doctors. She clings to her father’s yellow shorts and cries.

Families are sent home with a two-week food supply, depending on the number of children in the home.

In Fenoaivo, two sisters and a brother, all retired, share a house.

“It had been a long time since we had cultivated anything. On a good day the three of us share a bowl of rice, ”said Tsafaharie, 69.

In another house in this town, a 45-year-old man watches over his father’s body.

While it is difficult to pinpoint an exact number of deaths from hunger, which is why he died in June, according to his family.

“We don’t have enough money to buy a (cow) to feed the bereaved, so we can’t have a funeral,” Tsihorogne Monja said.

The corpse is in a separate hut, partially covered with a cloth.

“My father was very hungry. He ate too much cactus bark and tubers. That’s what killed him. It is as if he had been poisoned.

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Lindfield: The village of West Sussex is so pretty that it is forbidden to compete in the “best kept village” https://villageunderforest.com/lindfield-the-village-of-west-sussex-is-so-pretty-that-it-is-forbidden-to-compete-in-the-best-kept-village/ https://villageunderforest.com/lindfield-the-village-of-west-sussex-is-so-pretty-that-it-is-forbidden-to-compete-in-the-best-kept-village/#respond Sat, 18 Sep 2021 14:16:29 +0000 https://villageunderforest.com/lindfield-the-village-of-west-sussex-is-so-pretty-that-it-is-forbidden-to-compete-in-the-best-kept-village/ If you are looking for some of the most beautiful villages in the country, look no further than Sussex. The fairytale villages have historic stone cottages, cobbled streets and ancient castles, and are surrounded by some of the most uniquely British scenery. In fact, some are so beautiful that you have to act to make […]]]>

If you are looking for some of the most beautiful villages in the country, look no further than Sussex.

The fairytale villages have historic stone cottages, cobbled streets and ancient castles, and are surrounded by some of the most uniquely British scenery.

In fact, some are so beautiful that you have to act to make others shine.

Read more:9 magical walks in Sussex that seem straight out of a fairy tale

This is exactly what happened when the idyllic village of Lindfield in West Sussex was banned from participating in a competition called “Sussex’s Best Kept Village”.



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The decision was made in order to give other places in Sussex a chance to win, MyLondon reports.

After all, Lindfield is certainly not the only remarkable village that deserves to be recognized.

Lindfield, on the edge of Haywards Heath, is perfect for those who admire the wonders of nature.



The village pond at Lindfield
The village pond at Lindfield

High above the River Ouse, Lindfield is listed as an Area of ​​Outstanding Natural Beauty, so there is a lot of natural beauty to admire.

The village is undoubtedly a magnificent site of beauty and has a lot to explore on a day trip with family or friends.

The village has a rich history, with High Street following an ancient north-south trail that has been around for thousands of years, long before the Romans even existed.



The village has a rich history
The village has a rich history

It also has royal ties – King Edward III recognized the importance of medieval Lindfield and, in 1343, granted the village a royal charter to hold a market every Thursday, as well as two annual eight-day fairs.

The 14th century church, All Saints, is located at the top of the High Street overlooking the picturesque village.

Nearby is Church House, also known as The Tiger, which is the oldest building in the village and was once a hostel for travelers in need of food and accommodation.

What to do



Wakehurst Botanical Garden
Wakehurst Botanical Garden

The village is full of shops and services, including a supermarket, fashion boutiques, cafes and tea rooms, hairdressers, interior design and kitchen shops and even a traditional toy store.

Just three miles away is Borde Hill, a Grade II listed historic garden set in a park of over 200 acres.

On the edge of the village is the Eastern Road Nature Preserve, a nine-acre reserve with wetland habitat for birds, insects and butterflies.

A few miles away is Wakehurst, a National Trust property with 500 acres of ornamental gardens, woodlands and a nature reserve.

Where to eat

The village also has an array of pubs and restaurants for visitors.

The Stand Up Inn is a unique pub that offers authentic Thai cuisine, while the Witch Inn has a weekly changing menu and a selection of local alcoholic drinks.

Limes Thai Kitchen is an independent Thai restaurant that offers authentic cuisine, while Italian restaurant That’s Amore is a reliable option for those looking for alternative cuisine.

From the natural beauty and historic heritage of Lindfield to its High Street and variety of restaurants and pubs, it’s no wonder it’s known to be one of Sussex’s best villages.


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The crime-ravaged lost village full of highwaymen which is now one of London’s wealthiest areas https://villageunderforest.com/the-crime-ravaged-lost-village-full-of-highwaymen-which-is-now-one-of-londons-wealthiest-areas/ https://villageunderforest.com/the-crime-ravaged-lost-village-full-of-highwaymen-which-is-now-one-of-londons-wealthiest-areas/#respond Sat, 18 Sep 2021 03:00:00 +0000 https://villageunderforest.com/the-crime-ravaged-lost-village-full-of-highwaymen-which-is-now-one-of-londons-wealthiest-areas/ If you were to walk around Belgravia today, you would be greeted by beautiful buildings, grand architecture, and houses reserved for the wealthy. It’s no surprise that it’s located in London’s most expensive postcode. Seeing Belgravia now and knowing it’s in the most expensive postcode is nowhere near what it used to be. READ MORE: […]]]>

If you were to walk around Belgravia today, you would be greeted by beautiful buildings, grand architecture, and houses reserved for the wealthy.

It’s no surprise that it’s located in London’s most expensive postcode.

Seeing Belgravia now and knowing it’s in the most expensive postcode is nowhere near what it used to be.

READ MORE: Beautiful temple 5 minutes from a metro station which is a little bubble of peace



Much of Belgravia was built by a builder called Thomas Cubitt

It was called “Cinq Champs” during Tudor Times because it was a particularly dangerous area for people and highwaymen at night.

It was a swampy wasteland.

A place known to harbor criminals and thieves, it was an area people would actively avoid at night.

However, the “Five Fields” change came when King George III moved to Buckingham House and ordered that a row of houses be built on Grosvernor Place.

If you walk down Grosvernor Place now you will see these remarkable buildings as well as new developments.

Much of Belgravia was built by a builder called Thomas Cubitt.



Belgravia is full of upscale boutiques – far from its dark past

He was commissioned to build Belgravia by Richard Grosvernor in the 1820s and most of what you will see in Belgravia would have been designed by Cubitt.

It was given the name Belgravia because it was named after the village of Belgrave, which was close to the Grosvernor family’s main seat of Eaton Hall.

Cubitt had an influence over the next 30 years making Belgravia what we know it is now.

If you are ever around, you can visit the Thomas Cubitt Pub for a drink or a meal, and treat yourself to a magnificent view as you watch the world go by.



Tudor Times highwaymen would scratch their heads seeing how the area is now

Even though Belgravia may be one of the most expensive places in London, the opportunity to admire great designs and architecture is worth the trip.

Long, grand, white buildings are what you will see as you walk through a lot of Belgravia, whether it is someone’s residence or a country’s embassy.

From Belgrave Square to Eaton Square via Chester Square, walk statues of notable individuals who are important figures in history.

They are also the residences of former prime ministers, famous actors and many more.

The history of Belgravia goes back a long way and has hosted many stars.

Elizabeth Street is home to several cafes and quite simply picturesque settings to visit. Many stores will put floral decorations on their stores to brighten up the street and also, it makes a pleasing sight for the eyes of the visitors.

Peggy porschen is a bright pink cafe that sits on Ebury Street and is on its own worth a visit just to see its design. Add in the delicious cupcakes and tea, this is a place you have to try.

Within Belgravia you have independent and well known brands selling their products, cafes and restaurants to taste food and also, Buckingham Palace and St Paul’s Church are just a few steps away, right next to Knightsbridge.



The awesome new newsletter from MyLondon The 12 is packed with news, views, features and opinions from all over the city.

Each day we will send you a free email around noon with 12 stories to keep you entertained, informed and uplifted. It’s the perfect read for lunch.

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The highwaymen at the Tudor Times would scratch their heads when they saw how the area is now.

The imposing buildings, the multitude of things to do in this part of London make it such an interesting place to visit. Even though it was the plan of King George III and Cubitt when developing the region, Belgravia has become one of the most desirable areas in London.

Located in central London, getting to Belgravia is relatively stress-free and has several train stations nearby.

The ordinary person might not be able to live here, but you can certainly walk around the area and enjoy all the history it has to offer and experience the impressive architecture.

Want more MyLondon? Sign up for our daily newsletters for all the latest and greatest from London here.


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Niemeyer retires as village director https://villageunderforest.com/niemeyer-retires-as-village-director/ https://villageunderforest.com/niemeyer-retires-as-village-director/#respond Fri, 17 Sep 2021 19:08:40 +0000 https://villageunderforest.com/niemeyer-retires-as-village-director/ SHARE THIS STORY After seven very productive years with the Village of Tinley Park, Village Manager Dave Niemeyer has announced his retirement as Illinois City Manager. His last day as village chief will be Friday October 8. “I have had an enjoyable and rewarding 38-year career in local government in Illinois, and have been fortunate […]]]>

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After seven very productive years with the Village of Tinley Park, Village Manager Dave Niemeyer has announced his retirement as Illinois City Manager. His last day as village chief will be Friday October 8.

“I have had an enjoyable and rewarding 38-year career in local government in Illinois, and have been fortunate to work with many great people over the years,” said Niemeyer. “Tinley Park is a wonderful, close-knit and passionate community, and I will always cherish the lasting relationships and friendships I have developed here.”

Niemeyer started with the Village in June 2014. During his tenure he oversaw the development of three new Increased Tax Funding (TIF) neighborhoods, one of which was instrumental in bringing the Boulevard project to fruition. at Central Station. He also oversaw the financing of new infrastructure to serve other downtown Tinley developments and was instrumental in the revitalization of two shopping centers, Pete’s and Brixmor, at 159eStreet and Harlem Avenue.

“Dave’s great leadership skills were brought to the fore during the COVID-19 pandemic, when he oversaw budget cuts that allowed us to cut our expenses while continuing to provide quality services to residents.” , said Mayor Michael Glotz. “He has also worked closely with businesses to help them overcome the economic hardships caused by the pandemic. “



Niemeyer’s accomplishments also include bringing the Tinley Park Convention Center under new management, as well as managing an expiring TIF district and Cook County legal challenges to bring the EVEN Hotel brand to Tinley Park. He also oversaw a new music-focused branding plan, with the goal of attracting more development and revenue for Downtown Tinley.

Tinley Park Village manager Dave Niemeyer.  Photo courtesy of Tinley Park
Tinley Park Village manager Dave Niemeyer. Photo courtesy of Tinley Park

“Dave also oversaw the development of not one but two comprehensive strategic plans and was instrumental in reorganizing the community development department and engineering services so that we can better serve the public,” said Glotz said. “Providing in-house engineering services has saved the Village several thousand dollars a year.

Citizen awareness has also improved under Niemeyer’s leadership, with the addition of televised board meetings, a plethora of new social media accounts such as Facebook, Instagram and Twitter, the publication of surveys to citizens every three years and the creation of Tinley Park’s comprehensive annual report. . During Niemeyer’s tenure, the village also built the new 47 fire station, purchased new smart water meters for $ 6 million, and negotiated a deal with Will County for $ 80.e Widening of the avenue and other necessary improvements.

Prior to coming to the Village, Niemeyer was Village Director of Oak Brook, Illinois from 2007 to 2014. Prior to that, he was City Manager of Des Plaines from 2003 to 2007, Director of the Village of Homewood from 1998 to 2003, Director of Richton Park Village 1993-1998, Orland Hills Village Administrator 1988-1993, and City Administrator and Deputy Mayor of Harvard, Illinois, 1986-1988.

Niemeyer received a Bachelor of Science in Political Science in 1983 and a Master of Public Administration in 1985, both from Northern Illinois University at DeKalb.

Niemeyer will start working as an executive recruiter for the local government.

“We’re sorry to see Dave go, but we wish him all the best in his future endeavors,” said Glotz. “Dave is a hard worker, a great listener and a fantastic leader. He and his 38 years of experience will be missed.

The Tinley Park Village Board of Directors is expected to appoint Deputy Village Director Pat Carr to replace Niemeyer.



Ray hanania
Ray Hanania is an award-winning columnist, author and former Chicago City Hall reporter (1977-1992). A veteran who served in the Vietnam War and recipient of four SPJ Peter Lisagor Columnist Awards, Hanania writes weekly opinion columns on major US and Chicagoland topics for the Southwest News-Herald, Des Plaines Valley News, the Regional News, The Reporter Newspapers and Chicagoland suburbs.

Hanania also writes on Middle East issues for Arab News and The Arab Daily News criticizing government policies in the Israeli-Palestinian conflict.

Hanania was named “Best American Ethnic Columnist” by New America Media in November 2007, and is the 2009 recipient of the SPJ National Sigma Delta Chi Award for Columnist.

Email Ray Hanania at rghanania@gmail.com.

Ray hanania
Latest articles by Ray Hanania (see everything)

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Desolate villages facing famine in Madagascar https://villageunderforest.com/desolate-villages-facing-famine-in-madagascar/ https://villageunderforest.com/desolate-villages-facing-famine-in-madagascar/#respond Fri, 17 Sep 2021 06:32:18 +0000 https://villageunderforest.com/desolate-villages-facing-famine-in-madagascar/ Amboasary (Madagascar) (AFP) Nothing to eat, nothing to plant. The last rain in Ifotaka fell in May for two hours. Across the vast southern tip of Madagascar, drought has turned fields into bowls of dust. Over a million people are facing famine. On tens of thousands of hectares, the countryside is desolate. The harvest season […]]]>

Amboasary (Madagascar) (AFP)

Nothing to eat, nothing to plant. The last rain in Ifotaka fell in May for two hours.

Across the vast southern tip of Madagascar, drought has turned fields into bowls of dust. Over a million people are facing famine.

On tens of thousands of hectares, the countryside is desolate. The harvest season begins in October, leaving long lean weeks before the arrival of the meager harvests.

Some villages are abandoned. In others, people should be working in the fields, but instead they languish at home. There is nothing to harvest.

Hunger weighs on people, both in the mind and in the body. They move slowly and find it difficult to follow the conversation.

“I feel sick and worried. Every day I wonder what we are going to eat,” said Helmine Sija, 60 years old and a mother of six, in a village called Atoby.

– Eat cacti and weeds –

A little woman with gray hair and a hardened face, Sija tends to a pot of boiling cactus in front of her house. She cut the bites with a machete to prepare them for cooking.

You can’t really call it food. The concoction has little nutritional value, but it is a popular appetite suppressant, even if it causes an upset stomach.

Her three oldest have left home to look for work in other cities. She takes care of the youngest.

“I want to move to a more fertile place, where I can cultivate. But I don’t have enough money to leave, ”she said.

Médecins Sans Frontières dispatched a mobile clinic to move from village to village RIJASOLO AFP

Arzel Jonarson, 47, a former cassava farm worker, now collects firewood for sale, earning around 25 US cents per week. Enough to buy a bowl of rice.

In Ankilidoga, an elderly couple and their daughter prepare a meal of wild herbs, which they season with salt to reduce the bitterness. In better times, these were thrown away like weed. But their crops of corn, cassava and sweet potato failed.

Their village has a reservoir to collect rainwater. No one remembers the last time it was full.

“I haven’t received any help for two months,” said Kazy Zorotane, a 30-year-old single mother with four children. “The last time, in June, the government gave me money.

Around $ 26 (22 euros).

– Climate crisis –

Malnutrition regularly afflicts southern Madagascar. But the current drought is the worst in 40 years, according to the United Nations, which attributes the crisis to climate change.

Around the town of Ifotaka, people said the government had brought rice, beans and oil. But it was in August. Of the 500 people nominated for financial assistance, approximately 90 received the $ 26.

Doctors Without Borders dispatched a mobile clinic to move from village to village. Children cling to packets of “Pumpy”, a peanut butter paste designed to help severely malnourished people.

Through the waiting crowd, nurses and orderlies spot the most urgent cases, guiding them to the front line. Small children are weighed in a blue bucket.

Measuring tapes are wrapped around their little arms, to give an indication of the extreme severity of their malnutrition.

In Befeno, another village, nine-year-old Zapedisoa came with his grandmother. He is lazy, his eyes seem empty. At 20 kilograms (44 pounds), he has alarming symptoms and is receiving medication and dietary supplements.

Satinompeo, a five-year-old with short hair, weighs only 11 kilos. She suffers from severe malnutrition, but she is afraid of doctors. She clings to her father’s yellow shorts and cries.

Families are sent home with a two-week food supply, depending on the number of children in the home.

Current drought is worst in 40 years, UN says
Current drought is worst in 40 years, UN says RIJASOLO AFP

In Fenoaivo, two sisters and a brother, all retired, share a house.

“It’s been a long time since we’ve grown anything. On a good day the three of us share a bowl of rice,” said Tsafaharie, 69.

In another house in this town, a 45-year-old man watches over his father’s body.

While it is difficult to pinpoint an exact number of deaths from hunger, which is why he died in June, according to his family.

“We don’t have enough money to buy a (cow) to feed the bereaved, so we can’t have a funeral,” Tsihorogne Monja said.

The corpse is in a separate hut, partially covered with a cloth.

On tens of thousands of hectares, the countryside is desolate
On tens of thousands of hectares, the countryside is desolate RIJASOLO AFP

“My father was very hungry. He ate too much cactus bark and tubers. That’s what killed him. It was like he had been poisoned.”


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