Village people – Village Under Forest http://villageunderforest.com/ Thu, 24 Nov 2022 13:57:00 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://villageunderforest.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-2021-06-25T171231.357-150x150.png Village people – Village Under Forest http://villageunderforest.com/ 32 32 On Screen – Global Times https://villageunderforest.com/on-screen-global-times/ Thu, 24 Nov 2022 13:57:00 +0000 https://villageunderforest.com/on-screen-global-times/ Promotional materials for Jinxiu heshan Photo: Courtesy of Douban “Shanhe Jinxiu”: A TV series hailed for its realistic portrayal of poverty alleviation efforts A TV series focusing on China’s successful poverty alleviation efforts debuted in November, earning good reviews thanks to its realistic background and down-to-earth characters. The Shanhe Jinxiu (literally: Splendid Mountains […]]]>

Promotional materials for Jinxiu heshan Photo: Courtesy of Douban

“Shanhe Jinxiu”: A TV series hailed for its realistic portrayal of poverty alleviation efforts

A TV series focusing on China’s successful poverty alleviation efforts debuted in November, earning good reviews thanks to its realistic background and down-to-earth characters.

The Shanhe Jinxiu (literally: Splendid Mountains and Rivers) TV series is set in the Qinling Mountains of Shaanxi Province in northwest China.

In the 1990s, two villages were forced to merge into one village due to a natural disaster.

However, the village struggled with extreme poverty after the merger due to constant natural disasters and a long feud between the two formerly separated villages.

The village leader, main character Zhao Shuhe, decides to change the situation and help lift the village out of poverty.

Another main character is Guo Wen, who has lived in the village for a long time with his father. He develops a deep relationship with Zhao and the other inhabitants of this village.

Guo also pays more attention to the impoverished village after starting to work in the government and eventually his longtime wish is also to help lift the place out of poverty.

In order to create a better life for the village, people of two generations, under the leadership of Guo and Zhao, work to fight the poverty that the village has suffered for nearly three decades, and ultimately succeed.

The series has been praised for its realistic depiction of poverty in a mountain village.

For example, at the start of the show, Zhao Laifu’s death reveals the harm caused by the village’s ancestral motto “to starve rather than beg for food”.

Additionally, other details such as the village school’s struggle to pay teachers, children’s resistance to school, poor villagers who cannot afford to see a doctor or fix their house make the term “poverty” a living fact rather than an abstract concept for audiences.

world times

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How to get your community more involved in schools https://villageunderforest.com/how-to-get-your-community-more-involved-in-schools/ Thu, 17 Nov 2022 05:06:56 +0000 https://villageunderforest.com/how-to-get-your-community-more-involved-in-schools/ The phrase it takes a village to raise a child implies that to form an adult, a child must learn many different lessons from many different people in his or her environment. In other words, personalities are formed not only under the influence of the immediate family but of the whole community. A similar principle […]]]>

The phrase it takes a village to raise a child implies that to form an adult, a child must learn many different lessons from many different people in his or her environment. In other words, personalities are formed not only under the influence of the immediate family but of the whole community.

A similar principle can be applied to the education of children and young adults, but this principle is often not seen that way. Instead, education is once again interpreted as a matter of the parents in question. It is the parents’ job to choose and fund a child’s education, while the community takes a passive role, if any, in this whole ordeal.

While clearly this is a sub-optimal scenario, what can the community do to get started? How can a community get involved? Well, here are some suggestions that might be a great starting point.

How to involve the community more?

The first thing to consider is how to involve the community more. The question is that you have to start at the bottom. Here are some ideas for you to consider.

Involve student families more

The term community can be interpreted many different ways. Each student’s immediate community is their family and primary caregivers. So how can they get more involved? Well, first, through regular communication between them and the teaching staff.

They should call to request grades and inquire about student attendance. Then, since education is an ongoing process with many stages, they might want to show more interest in the next educational institution the student is going to enroll in. For example, questions about applying to university should be taken very seriously.

It’s a two-way street. Schools can also do a lot to involve these parents. For example, they could be more transparent and accessible. They could also learn about the family situation even before a child becomes a problem. One way to establish this collaboration early on is to create parent and family advocacy groups.

Use the fact that the school is an educational institution

While an impromptu workshop or class can be incredibly effective, you need to take advantage of the fact that the school is already a learning institution. There is so much equipment out there, and an open day at a school can make so much difference in their lives.

In a school, you can start a program by project quite naturally. You can also establish cross-disciplinary collaborations to show students that the things they learn aren’t usually applied on their own. This alone can help them understand that the things they are learning have real applications, which is already contributing to their intrinsic motivation.

Other than that, you can turn everything into a skill-based learning experience. Just like with regular programs, they must complete one course to unlock the next. You can do tests to serve as checkpoints.

Involve local businesses

Local businesses can help improve the quality of the program in different ways. First, companies employ experts, which means they can contribute by sending professionals as guest speakers. Then they can sponsor events, donate to schools, or even start open houses and internship programs.

The truth is, you can even contact a company that specializes in K-12 Education programs. With Educational Programming as a Service, you can make the most meaningful difference in the community by delivering premium educational content on demand. Not to mention that managing the marketing behind this is, in itself, quite difficult.

Try to increase engagement

Keep in mind that while some of this increased engagement may happen spontaneously, you will often need to nudge the bigger picture. Here are some ideas worth trying.

Workshops organized by professionals

Workshops are a unique didactic method for several reasons. They provide you with hands-on training on the current topic. Most often they are used to reach non-traditional audiences and explore unusual didactic techniques.

The key to a workshop is to provide an educational environment in which participants can express their creativity. In other words, they are guided by professionals and helped to discover ideas on their own. They are then trained on how to use this idea to their advantage.

Most importantly, workshops provide a safe environment where various ideas and experiences can be tested without dangerous repercussions. Having a key person leading the workshop can help generate more interest in the community.

Student volunteering at local charities or nonprofits

So far, you may have concluded that the burden of effort is on the organization. In fact, students may be encouraged to make an effort to volunteer for local charities and nonprofits.

First of all, it’s an ethical thing and it helps build character. were already make an effort to build a better world, so why not apply some of these goals to our youth as well? Second, it helps give these students a sample of what it’s like to have real-life responsibility, which is an invaluable experience.

Keep in mind that it is also a way to make a difference, which is of great interest to millennials and younger generations. Besides that, they can also socialize and meet people with similar values/inclinations.

Not to mention that each task requires you to master a specific skill. For students engaging in something like this for the first time, it will undoubtedly involve a learning experience.

Wrap

Better education only makes better people if it is shaped by a healthy community. To ensure that all of these factors hold, you must ensure that the community is actively involved in this educational process. It is also essential that this takes place at all levels of the community. For example, you can’t expect the whole local community to care about education if parents don’t. As we said, it takes a village and a lot of effort, but the result is worth it.

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The village of Laois recognizing more than 1.4 million euros to realize its dream https://villageunderforest.com/the-village-of-laois-recognizing-more-than-1-4-million-euros-to-realize-its-dream/ Sat, 12 Nov 2022 18:00:49 +0000 https://villageunderforest.com/the-village-of-laois-recognizing-more-than-1-4-million-euros-to-realize-its-dream/ The Durrow Development Forum has thanked everyone who helped secure a huge injection of funds which is expected to provide a vital new center which could play a major role in the future of the village. The Durrow Development Forum says it is delighted that its government grant application has raised €1,456,983.00 for the Durrow […]]]>

The Durrow Development Forum has thanked everyone who helped secure a huge injection of funds which is expected to provide a vital new center which could play a major role in the future of the village.

The Durrow Development Forum says it is delighted that its government grant application has raised €1,456,983.00 for the Durrow Community Enterprise Centre. The funding came following an application to the Regeneration and Rural Development Fund.

The Forum released a statement explaining some of the background.

“The need for the center was raised as part of the consultation process for the 2019-2023 Community Plan, which identified community space, arts space and remote work/coworking space as a priority to serve the city and the wider hinterland,” they said.

The Forum also outlined its goals for the new building to be constructed next to the former Methodist Hall.

“The Center will primarily be a hub for coworking and remote workers and a hub to promote arts, heritage and cultural activities. It will also support existing and new organizations by providing accessible and accessible meeting and event space. will also host training and education programs targeting young people,” they said.

The community also thanked the people they believe played an important role in securing the funding.

“We would like to take this opportunity to thank Chief Executive John Mulholland, Ken Morley SEE, Tom O’Leary and the entire Laois County Council team for their assistance with this grant application, as well as our local councilors and politicians for their support in the context and for following up on the request over the past few months with Minister Heather Humphreys.

“Durrow Development Forum would also like to express their thanks to our hard working committee and volunteers, and to all businesses, residents, clubs and organizations, and the Laois Partnership Company for their continued support of all of our projects. over the years,” they said.

Although the grant represents a big step forward, the Forum explained that the application requires matching funding. Although the Forum has been working on fundraising for the past few years with the Durrow Scarecrow Festival, they expect to continue to do so over the next few years to facilitate this build for the community.

Figures released by the Department of Rural and Community Development put the total cost of the project at €1.82 million. Work on the project began before the pandemic when the Durrow Community Forum secured the hall and the adjacent former Civil Defense building which would be demolished.

The ambitious project will see the construction of a large two-storey extension built over the hall.

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Why Influencer Marketing Takes a Whole Village https://villageunderforest.com/why-influencer-marketing-takes-a-whole-village/ Wed, 09 Nov 2022 18:00:00 +0000 https://villageunderforest.com/why-influencer-marketing-takes-a-whole-village/ In 2013, Vickie Segar was about to enter a new stage in her life: motherhood. For nearly a decade, she worked as a creative, both on the agency side for Crispin Porter and Bogusky and Wieden + Kennedy, and on the client side for fitness brand Equinox and a direct-to-consumer (DTC) startup. called Aloha. . […]]]>

In 2013, Vickie Segar was about to enter a new stage in her life: motherhood. For nearly a decade, she worked as a creative, both on the agency side for Crispin Porter and Bogusky and Wieden + Kennedy, and on the client side for fitness brand Equinox and a direct-to-consumer (DTC) startup. called Aloha. . Starting humbly from her kitchen table in Brooklyn, she took a leap of faith that would give her the flexibility to adapt to her life as a mother, as well as the opportunity to prove those who doubted influencer marketing wrong. .

The result was Village Marketing, a social media agency that merges brand and performance marketing – leveraging bloggers and creators in a full funnel capacity to build brands. Initially working with former colleagues from her previous jobs, Vickie describes how the early years were particularly challenging as the company progressed into the emerging – but virtually non-existent – ​​industry of influencer marketing.

“Everyone said influencer marketing wasn’t real and wouldn’t last,” she says. “The influencer industry didn’t exist in the form it has today, nor did social. But I had started doing influencer marketing in one form or another (leveraging personal brands to build the consumer brands I worked for) three to four years before I started Village. It was really the merging of my creative agency experience with my acquisition marketing experience that led me to create an agency that had a comprehensive marketing approach.

Building brands through people” is the philosophy behind Village Marketing – an idea born out of Vickie’s observations of the public’s growing mistrust of brands. “Consumers, who are incredibly smart, seek the truth,” she says, explaining how people‘s insights and anecdotes seem more reliable and less biased than traditional messaging straight from a brand. Although they are paid to market products, Vickie says influencers can act as “critical curators” and are often selective about the brand partnerships they offer to their audience – allowing brands to reach a group more targeted and applicable demographic, and allowing the influencer to speak more honestly about a product they really use or believe in.

“At Village, we view influencers as both talent and media,” she says. “It allows us to think about how a brand can best penetrate the social space where its consumer spends 3.5 to 4.5 hours a day. It’s our job to make sure the right people are talking about the brand at scale and making things happen for our clients’ businesses.

Vickie acknowledges that the influencer marketing space is still in its infancy, but also has matured a lot over the past decade. Brands now have 10 years of experience using influencers as representatives and are now allocating larger shares of their advertising spend to this sector. Soon, she says, “influencers are going to be commerce” – predicting that they will simply be an extension of the retail ecosystem, alongside traditional marketing.

The reason for influencer marketing’s success over other forms of social and digital marketing seems obvious when explained by Vickie, who believes it’s the best method of reaching consumers online. According to her, the main alternatives – paid social ads and proprietary channels – are not sought after by consumers and are, “mostly noise”. She continues, “Influencer marketing places brands in the content that people are on social media for. The content is less scripted, it’s personalized, it portrays brands in consumers’ lives rather than consumers’ minds, and it’s proven to be much more impactful and memorable. »

Now 200 strong, Village has emerged from the pandemic with momentum, growing alongside the growing industries of which its customers are a part. In addition to a host of loyal clients from day one, the agency has created work for a variety of “brands that are built by good people who want to do good work,” and even two U.S. presidents, presidents Biden and Obama.

“I will always be incredibly proud to run a presidential campaign on TikTok, YouTube and Instagram,” Vickie says. “Not only did we have to invent what influencer marketing for a political race should look like, but we had to take risks on a massive scale and under heavy press scrutiny. In the end, the job worked, and of all the campaigns we needed to succeed, this was the one.

Unlike DTC brands, tracking ROI can be more challenging for larger brands that invest in influencer marketing. Therefore, educating big brands on upper and mid-funnel models, and how to use data and tracking, is part of Vickie’s job. With more and more time spent by consumers on social media, she says it makes “very good sense” for big brands to increase their influencer marketing budget proportionally – recommending up to 15-20% for a Fortune 500 company, and 50-70% for a DTC brand.

As with all emerging fields, however, there are skeptics and opponents to the sector. Vickie sheds light on the three common influencer marketing myths she’s noticed most often: that if an influencer is doing something wrong, they’re representative of the entire industry; that influencers are dishonest because they get paid, and that influencers shouldn’t be paid at all.

Refuting these ideas, she says, “Influencers say ‘no’ more than they say ‘yes’ to brand partnerships. The good ones only accept brands they really like. And influencers get paid because they are the creative director, producer, talent, scout, editor, project manager, and media channel. Along with running what is a full-service creative agency, they also sit in their DMs to build relationships with the audiences you want to meet. I don’t understand why anyone would debate whether creators should be paid. »

Continuing, she adds that relationships are everything in the influencer space. “If you don’t respect the creation (the influencer), their craft, their relationship with their audience, then you shouldn’t work in the space.”

After joining the Wunderman Thompson Network earlier this year, Vickie looks forward to expanding the agency’s work into a more integrated marketing approach. Now, with the backing of one of the largest agency networks in the world, Village’s influencer work can combine with the broader verticals of commerce, data and social media in which Wunderman Thompson has expertise. experts and infrastructure. “It was wonderful,” says Vickie. “Having smarter, more creative minds in your business is never a bad thing.”

This team of talented and experienced leaders has enabled Village to continue to leverage creators for influencer work and all other forms of paid media. But finding the right person is not as easy as hiring someone from the network. When adding to this dream team, Vickie has ambitious criteria to ensure the Village team is made up of smart, positive people who are ready to bring a new vision or perspective. “I hire people who are excited about the unknown – about the possibility of being the first to something,” she says. “I want people who have an entrepreneurial spirit and the ability to make things happen, even if the path is different. We hire as many non-influencer marketers as influencer marketers. We need people who can build a communications strategy or a data dashboard – a tough mix – and so we do a ton of training to develop the talent that’s right for us.

With innovations constantly developing in the influencer marketing space, there’s never a dull moment (and rarely a second to stop) for Vickie and her “villagers”. So, as she looks to the end of the year and into 2023, there’s plenty of excitement on the horizon and plenty of opportunities to continue the trajectory that started from Vickie’s kitchen table. “Platforms are constantly changing, and each change is an opportunity for us to do something different. We’re supporting exciting new brands and continuing to develop how we use influencers to build brands.

In closing, she adds that she is quite sure of one thing: “There has certainly never been a more exciting time to be in our industry.”

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‘It’s much scarier to face winter here’: Britain’s coldest village braces for freezing weather | UK cost of living crisis https://villageunderforest.com/its-much-scarier-to-face-winter-here-britains-coldest-village-braces-for-freezing-weather-uk-cost-of-living-crisis/ Sun, 06 Nov 2022 10:00:00 +0000 https://villageunderforest.com/its-much-scarier-to-face-winter-here-britains-coldest-village-braces-for-freezing-weather-uk-cost-of-living-crisis/ On the first day of November in Braemar, Aberdeenshire, there is a bitter chill in the air and the temperature hovers around 6°C. It’s balmy autumn weather for the village, nestled at the foot of the Cairngorm Mountains and holder of the unenviable title of Britain’s coldest place, having Record low temperatures recorded -27.2°C twice […]]]>

On the first day of November in Braemar, Aberdeenshire, there is a bitter chill in the air and the temperature hovers around 6°C. It’s balmy autumn weather for the village, nestled at the foot of the Cairngorm Mountains and holder of the unenviable title of Britain’s coldest place, having Record low temperatures recorded -27.2°C twice in the past 40 years. Last year the village experienced Britain’s coldest night since 1995, when temperatures dropped to -23C in February.

Braemar’s temperatures are believed to reach such extremes due to its geography, with the surrounding mountains essentially transform the village into a “bowl” in which cold air descends from mountain tops and becomes trapped. Over the next few months, residents can expect temperatures in the -20s accompanied by heavy snowfall, freezing rain and storms. But while the people of Braemar are well prepared for the weather, little can protect them from energy price outbreak here as in the whole country.

Hazel Williams, director of the Braemar Highland Games Centre, says people are worried. Photograph: Katherine Anne Rose/The Observer

“When I was little you ate your tea with the Calor gas stove on and no lights on to try and save energy – I can’t believe we’re actually going to go back to that,” says Hazel Williams.

“Not having your heating here in the winter would be very dangerous, so you don’t have much choice,” adds Williams, manager of Braemar’s Highland Games Centre.

“I think people feel a little stuck and a little stuck. They are certainly worried about heating their house this winter.

The cold can be so extreme in Braemar that the buildings are designed accordingly. The Highland Games Centre, completed in 2018 and home to the Braemar Gatheringhas heated pipes and drains to prevent heavy snowfall from weighing down the roof and to prevent icicles from pulling the gutters down.

Newer homes are also built with metal grates in their roofs to ensure snow collection cannot fall and damage cars. But the village is also home to a number of historic buildings and houses, many of which are listed and therefore single glazed and uninsulated.

Braemar, Cairngorms

“Here you wake up in the morning and there’s ice inside your windows, and there’s only light between 9 a.m. and 3 p.m.,” Williams says. “You have to have the lights on; you need to heat your house. It’s much scarier to face winter in Braemar at the foot of the hills than in London, for example.

While Braemar, nearly 100 miles north of Edinburgh, is a relatively affluent town with a reliable turnover of tourists, it is also home to a number of council tenants who have found themselves at center of a line this year when Aberdeen Council announced now-suspended plans to replace coal fires with central heating to meet environmental targets.

Coal fires remain the cheapest way to heat a home and are standard in many older Braemar homes, but the price of logs and coal has also risen. Last month, a new “log bank” was announced in which surplus wood donated by local landowners will be distributed through a food bank.

“I think a lot of people are very nervous about what they’re going to do,” says butcher Gareth Johnston. “I’m worried – we’ve already left about a month later than usual to start putting the heating on and I don’t dare put it on at peak times.

“But I don’t know what else people are supposed to do other than swallow and see what happens when the bill comes. You can’t just freeze to death.

Severe weather has become less predictable in recent years, Johnston says, with reliable snowfall giving way to short, fierce storms that often arrive without warning.

“It’s almost like stepping back in time,” he says. “When I was a kid my mum always had candles, torches…basically a storm pack set up for the winter. We never needed it until last year. Everything is supposed to be better, the technology is supposed to be better, but it’s like we’re going back to the 50s or 60s.”

Butcher Gareth Johnston in his shop in Braemar
Butcher Gareth Johnston says people are cooking up storms before frost. Photograph: Katherine Anne Rose/The Observer

Dave Evans, owner of the Braemar Brewing Company, in a building shared with his wife’s patisserie and, upstairs, their family home, is also feeling the effect of rising energy prices on his small business .

“My energy bills have increased fivefold from around £450 to over £2,000,” he says. “I had to raise my prices because prices went up in all areas – not just energy but deliveries, products, everything.”

Evans’ wife’s patisserie is now closed for the winter, with declining tourist numbers making it impossible to keep the space’s heating and lighting at the same level during quiet months. But there’s no option to just shut down some buildings and heat others instead, Evans says. “When it drops to -20 and below the pipes start to freeze and then you have much bigger issues to deal with so you have to keep pushing things forward.

“There will be people in difficulty this winter. There are already,” he said. But, hopes Evans, the community will take care of those in need. During last November’s storm Arwenthe Fife Arms Hotel in the center of the village has used its emergency generator to provide hot meals and a warm place to those who have been without electricity for days.

Dave Evans of the Braemar Brewing Company
Dave Evans of the Braemar Brewing Company says his energy bills have increased fivefold. Photograph: Katherine Anne Rose/The Observer

“People here are very resilient and everyone pitches in, whether it’s food, shelter or shoveling snow,” says Evans.

“People will take care of each other – it’s just small village life.”

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Spend a quiet fall day in the quaint village of Cold Spring https://villageunderforest.com/spend-a-quiet-fall-day-in-the-quaint-village-of-cold-spring/ Thu, 03 Nov 2022 10:15:31 +0000 https://villageunderforest.com/spend-a-quiet-fall-day-in-the-quaint-village-of-cold-spring/ November 03, 2022, 10:14 a.m.Updated 27 mins ago By: News 12 Staff If you’re looking for a nice place to spend a quiet fall day, the beautiful, quaint village of Cold Spring might be the perfect place for your next road trip: close to home! In a place full of scenery and culture, our first […]]]>

If you’re looking for a nice place to spend a quiet fall day, the beautiful, quaint village of Cold Spring might be the perfect place for your next road trip: close to home!

In a place full of scenery and culture, our first stop is a unique concept store – Paulette Cold Spring. “It’s a place where you can just relax. Something for people to sit down and take a break and shop or not, but have a coffee,” says Jacqueline Azria, owner of Paulette Cold Spring.

That’s right – you can stock up and browse an eclectic range of designs for all clothing and jewelry.

You’ll also find plenty of locally made gifts to take home a piece of Cold Spring.

Between the pastries and the coffee – much of it is locally sourced.

Next stop is Judie’s Bungalow, where you’ll find a mix of all kinds of artwork and furniture from Judie Gordon herself! “Everything is original, they won’t find it anywhere else unless it’s mine. What’s good for me is that it’s my studio,” says Gordon.

In fact, Judie handcrafts everything you see, from hats to decorations and more. She even restores antique furniture with her own vintage touch!

And speaking of artwork, you have to check out Mother Nature’s exhibit on Cold Spring’s iconic waterfront. From West Point and beyond, the views are so vast and spectacular.

Before heading home, treat yourself to Moo Moos Creamery, an ice cream staple. Every day you’ll find 16 rotating house flavors, all made from a family recipe from the early 90s.

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The village hopes the actions will help preserve Samoa’s national bird https://villageunderforest.com/the-village-hopes-the-actions-will-help-preserve-samoas-national-bird/ Sun, 30 Oct 2022 22:26:09 +0000 https://villageunderforest.com/the-village-hopes-the-actions-will-help-preserve-samoas-national-bird/ Samoa national manumea bird mural on the east wall of the New Zealand High Commission office in Apia Photo: Autagavaia Teepee Autagavaia In Samoa, a village is banning the shooting of the country’s national bird, the manumea, as part of an effort to save it from extinction. The Samoa Observer reports Falealupo Mayor Taofinu’u Lamositele, […]]]>

Samoa national manumea bird mural on the east wall of the New Zealand High Commission office in Apia
Photo: Autagavaia Teepee Autagavaia

In Samoa, a village is banning the shooting of the country’s national bird, the manumea, as part of an effort to save it from extinction.

The Samoa Observer reports Falealupo Mayor Taofinu’u Lamositele, saying he is happy that the village’s efforts have been recognized, and that it is now classified as “manumea friendly”.

“The whole village has been informed that no one is allowed to shoot it but they must take pictures or register the bird when it is seen,” Taofinu’u said.

The bird is called manumea because it is a shy bird. It has a colorful body with a distinct yellow beak.

Explaining what he thinks are the reasons why the birds are difficult to spot, the mayor said the manumea is selective in the types of other birds it mixes with or the insects it eats.

“The manumea doesn’t like many birds and insects. The only birds it likes are the fiaui or the white-throated pigeon,” he said.

“I have to remind people that our ancestors always preserved the forests, and that’s why Falealupo has a lot of forests, so we know these birds.”

He said they are now working with the Department of Environment and the Samoa Conservation Society to help search for the manumea.

The manumea, also known as the tooth-billed pigeon or the Samoan dodo, is found only in Samoa.

Several surveys have confirmed that its number is extremely low.

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Sae village gets double lane bridge after 55 years: Tony – Jammu Kashmir Latest News | Tourism https://villageunderforest.com/sae-village-gets-double-lane-bridge-after-55-years-tony-jammu-kashmir-latest-news-tourism/ Thu, 27 Oct 2022 21:46:30 +0000 https://villageunderforest.com/sae-village-gets-double-lane-bridge-after-55-years-tony-jammu-kashmir-latest-news-tourism/ AAP leader and DDC member Suchetgarh Taranjit Singh Tony during the inauguration of the double lane bridge. Excelsior Correspondent JAMMU, Oct 27: Taranjit Singh Tony, chairman of the Aam Aadmi J&K Party for Administrative Engagement and Minority Affairs and member of DDC Suchetgarh today called the BJP a ‘Jumla’ party and blasted it for to […]]]>
AAP leader and DDC member Suchetgarh Taranjit Singh Tony during the inauguration of the double lane bridge.

Excelsior Correspondent

JAMMU, Oct 27: Taranjit Singh Tony, chairman of the Aam Aadmi J&K Party for Administrative Engagement and Minority Affairs and member of DDC Suchetgarh today called the BJP a ‘Jumla’ party and blasted it for to be the best in rhetoric but useless on the ground to do nothing to help the people.
The senior PAA leader was speaking after the inauguration of a double-lane bridge between Hara Peer and Sae villages. He said that this bridge was 55 years old pending the request of local people, especially those belonging to Sae village.
In a veiled attack on local BJP leaders, Tony said the former cabinet minister never paid heed to the long-standing demand for the construction of this double-lane bridge.
The head of the AAP clarified that the style of operation of the AAP is different from other political parties because for the AAP, the top priority is the realization of the aspirations of the people and everything comes after the satisfaction of the people.
Tony said he promised the people during the SDC election race that he would see to it that the bridge was built and today its work is underway. He said it was a Diwali and Bhai Dooj gift from him to the people of the constituency and also promised to start the bridge project between Nikowal and Zona Farm at a cost of Rs 22 crore soon after the announcement. government approval. “The estimated cost of the bridge between Hara Peer and Sae is Rs 11 crore and the concerned man-Anil Sharma, who is building the bridge has assured that the same will be made operational in record time,” Tony said adding that the The bridge’s strategic location will also help the army transport logistics in the shortest possible time.
Locals demanded that the bridge be named after Sobha Singh, the region’s top leader who led the fight for the bridge throughout his life.
Others present at the occasion include Sarpanch Sae, Sarbajit Singh, Sarpanch Sham Lal Bhagat, Tilak Raj Bhagat, Sarpanch Shashi Bhagat, BDC Chairman Tarsem Singh, Ex Sarpanch Lucky Choudhary, APP Chief Executive Mandeep Choudhary and Avinash Choudhary.

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Halloween in Edgemont Village, one year before the riot https://villageunderforest.com/halloween-in-edgemont-village-one-year-before-the-riot/ Sun, 23 Oct 2022 15:55:00 +0000 https://villageunderforest.com/halloween-in-edgemont-village-one-year-before-the-riot/ Police and firefighters were called in to disperse a large crowd of unruly youths on Halloween night in Edgemont Village in 1966 It’s 1966, it’s Halloween and the kids are looking for something to do. Edgemont Village had become a Halloween gathering spot in previous years, and this year was no different. Local radio stations […]]]>

Police and firefighters were called in to disperse a large crowd of unruly youths on Halloween night in Edgemont Village in 1966

It’s 1966, it’s Halloween and the kids are looking for something to do. Edgemont Village had become a Halloween gathering spot in previous years, and this year was no different.

Local radio stations began reporting on the growing crowd, which only enticed more young people from nearby areas to come and check out the scene. It wasn’t long before the rowdy crowd started throwing eggs and bottles, causing damage to many storefronts and prompting the arrival of police cars and fire trucks. Fire hoses were aimed at the crowd and several people were eventually charged with unlawful assembly.

This photo shows an intersection in Edgemont Village, ca. 1965, which a year later would be filled with teenagers. Can you spot the skeleton?

Visit the MONOVA website for more information on North Shore history and to plan your visit to MONOVA: Museum of North Vancouver, now open at 115 West Esplanade in The Shipyards.

Currently, MONOVA: Archives of North Vancouver, at 3203 Institute Road in Lynn Valley, is open by appointment only. Contact: archives@monova.ca

Navigate the culture of the Côte-Nord using the Cultural compass of the Côte-Nord.

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Former Waterbury Village voters to weigh in on town center housing project https://villageunderforest.com/former-waterbury-village-voters-to-weigh-in-on-town-center-housing-project/ Wed, 19 Oct 2022 22:02:00 +0000 https://villageunderforest.com/former-waterbury-village-voters-to-weigh-in-on-town-center-housing-project/ WATERBURY, Vermont (WCAX) – A major affordable housing project in the heart of Waterbury is on the line in a special election next week. Only about 1,500 voters in the Village’s Public Services District will vote on the project, which could have implications for the entire city. Ask anyone in Vermont and they’ll tell you […]]]>

WATERBURY, Vermont (WCAX) – A major affordable housing project in the heart of Waterbury is on the line in a special election next week. Only about 1,500 voters in the Village’s Public Services District will vote on the project, which could have implications for the entire city.

Ask anyone in Vermont and they’ll tell you how hard it is to find affordable housing.

“The rent is so expensive. Even with a two-income family, it’s tough,” said Melodie Campbell, a former Waterbury resident who says she faced housing insecurity. She now lives in Barre but is keeping a close eye on Monday’s voter in Waterbury. “Everyone knew everyone and everyone helps everyone.”

The site at 51 South Main is where the old City Hall and municipal offices once stood before they suffered heavy damage during Tropical Storm Irene. They were demolished in 2019 to make way for parking as the massive Main Street development project was underway. Monday’s vote will determine the future of the site. Affordable housing developer Downstreet Housing wants to buy the land for $138,000 to build 24 new affordable one- and two-bedroom apartments.

Waterbury is not immune to Vermont’s housing crisis. Local employers have raised the red flag on the need for more units. City officials say some local jobs are vacant due to a lack of housing for workers. “A project like this definitely starts to help bring that needle and bring in the supply to meet the demand,” said Mark Pomilio, Waterbury’s director of economic development.

But the housing proposal does not appeal to everyone. Some residents say they are worried there will be too many units for the space and others say it could lead to safety issues downtown. One resident even offered to buy and develop the property himself.

City officials say they held several public hearings to answer questions about the project and who would qualify to live there. “Many people working in normal jobs here in Waterbury would qualify here,” said Skip Flanders of the Public Services District.

The special meeting is Monday at 6:30 p.m. at the Main Street Fire Hall for eligible voters.

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