Middle Village honors and remembers lives lost on 20th anniversary of September 11 – QNS.com

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Hundreds of people gathered at Juniper Valley Park in Middle Village on the 20th anniversary of the September 11 terrorist attacks for a solemn memorial program, in memory of the nearly 3,000 people who lost their lives that day in New York, the Pentagon and Shanksville, Pennsylvania.

The emotional program included reading the names of the 9/11 victims in the surrounding area, a video montage of the attacks and aftermath accompanied by Alan Jackson’s song “Where Were You When The World Ceased to Turn”, as well as the celebration of the Homage in the Light, shining against the late summer evening sky.

Community members attend the 9/11 Memorial and Candlelight Vigil in Juniper Valley Park. (Photo by Gabriele Holtermann)
Community members attend the 9/11 Memorial and Candlelight Vigil in Juniper Valley Park. (Photo by Gabriele Holtermann)
Community members attend the 9/11 Memorial and Candlelight Vigil in Juniper Valley Park. (Photo by Gabriele Holtermann)

The Middle Village 9/11 Watch Committee has held a candlelight vigil and memorial service at Juniper Valley Park for 20 years. The first vigil took place a few days after the worst terrorist attack on American soil and drew 6,000 people.

Organizers and elected officials had an important message: never forget that fateful day, which has become synonymous with sacrifice, sorrow, heroism and unity.

Frank DeBiase, chairman of the 9/11 Vigil Committee, noted that the committee, which includes a group of volunteers from Middle Village and Maspeth, invited 13 local schools to participate in a 9/11 essay contest.

“Only one school submitted entries,” said DeBiase, a retired corrections captain and Ground Zero first responder.

He then introduced Melissa Rojas, senior of Christ the King High School, who won first place with her essay “A Tragedy Without End”.

Community members attend the 9/11 Memorial and Candlelight Vigil in Juniper Valley Park. (Photo by Gabriele Holtermann)
A group of Boy Scouts attend the 9/11 Memorial and Candlelight Vigil. (Photo by Gabriele Holtermann)
A commemorative display shows crosses representing the victims and their families. (Photo by Gabriele Holtermann)

Queens Borough Vice President Rhonda Binda said the legacy of the victims lives on in their families and it is the duty of New Yorkers to honor them.

“And another way to honor them is to celebrate our freedom as Americans and to keep this city and this borough open and embracing diversity,” Binda said.

MP Grace Meng expressed her gratitude to the volunteers who organized the memorial and to the families who brought to the vigil young people who were either too young to remember 9/11 or who were not even born at the time. has occurred.

“I say this more as a mom than an elected official,” Meng said, urging schools across the country to teach on the darkest day in US history. “So that we can make sure our future generations of young people know and understand what happened that day, this should not be a single school in our district submitting essays to talk about and remember 9/11 . “

Elected officials and NYPD officials attend the 9/11 Memorial and Candlelight Vigil in Juniper Valley Park. (Photo by Gabriele Holtermann)
Elected officials and NYPD officials attend the 9/11 Memorial and Candlelight Vigil in Juniper Valley Park. (Photo by Gabriele Holtermann)

Assembly member Brian Barnwell, who lost his cousin FDNY firefighter Edward White on September 11, pointed out that some, unfortunately, did not pay much attention to the anniversary of the terrorist attacks.

“It’s our job to make sure the next generation of Americans know what happened and why it happened,” Barnwell said.

Assembly member Andrew Hevesi told the story of a neighborhood kid who was “the best athlete” he has ever seen play in any sport and “the nicest guy”.

Hevesi’s childhood friend worked for Cantor Fitzgerald, who occupied floors 101 through 105 of the North Tower. He perished with more than 650 of his colleagues.

“I keep coming back to this day because the feeling is sadness. But that feeling is also combined with anger, still angry that Americans have been attacked, ”Hevesi said. “I am grateful to live in the greatest country in the history of the world and to celebrate and come back here every year to remember what happened 20 years ago.”

Large banner with the American flag, the Statue of Liberty representing unity is suspended from the rail. (Photo by Gabriele Holtermann)
Community members attend the 9/11 Memorial and Candlelight Vigil in Juniper Valley Park. (Photo by Gabriele Holtermann)
Community members attend the 9/11 Memorial and Candlelight Vigil in Juniper Valley Park. (Photo by Gabriele Holtermann)

City Councilor Robert Holden recalled the first vigil on September 16, 2001 and how proud he was of the 6,000 community members who united in Juniper Valley Park. He said some marched to FDNY Squad 288 / Hazmat 1 fire station in Maspeth, which lost 19 firefighters on September 11.

In 2013, community members asked the Landmarks Preservation Commission to mark the fire station, but were turned down due to policies, Holden said.

“I said ‘Bologna’… we are going to fight,” Holden said, sharing that he would present legislation to city council to mark the fire station dedicated to the 19 firefighters.

Holden said it was the duty of those who lived through the tragedy to tell the next generation about the lives lost on September 11 and the number of devastated families.

“So even if I have to introduce a law to make it mandatory in New York public schools, I will. It has to be taught, ”Holden said. “That’s what you should do.”

The Tribute in Light shines against the clear late summer sky on the 20th anniversary of the September 11 terrorist attacks. (Photo by Gabriele Holtermann)
NYPD members attend the 9/11 Memorial and Candlelight Vigil in Juniper Valley Park. (Photo by Gabriele Holtermann)
A Boy Scout attends the 9/11 Memorial and Candlelight Vigil. (Photo by Gabriele Holtermann)

State Senator Joseph Addabbo said it was important to remember those who perished on September 11, those who die of September 11-related illnesses and the heroic efforts of those who saved thousands of lives That day.

He recalled that more than 10,000 construction workers in the greater New York area have joined the FDNY and NYPD to help search for victims and survivors.

“I like to think of 9/12 the next day because we started to rebuild. We weren’t afraid. We haven’t backed down, ”Addabbo said. “We got together with those who lost others and helped them rebuild their lives. “

A commemorative exhibit features members of the NYPD and FDNY, the Twin Towers and crosses representing the victims. (Photo by Gabriele Holtermann)

He urged everyone to rediscover the spirit of unity that everyone felt after the terrorist attacks.

“We started with the flag and patriotism, and therefore in honor of those we have lost, in honor of those who have been saved and in honor of first responders and veterans, may we work together as a community, ”Addabbo said.


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